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  1. Neil Delaney (1996). Romantic Love and Loving Commitment: Articulating a Modern Ideal. American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (4):339 - 356.
    This essay presents an ideal for modern Western romantic love.The basic ideas are the following: people want to form a distinctive sort of plural subject with another, what Nozick has called a "We", they want to be loved for properties of certain kinds, and they want this love to establish and sustain a special sort of commitment to them over time.
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  2. Paul Gilbert (1991). Human Relationships: A Philosophical Introduction. B. Blackwell.
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  3. Steven D. Hales (1995). The Impossibility of Unconditional Love. Public Affairs Quarterly 9 (4):317-320.
    There are two main ways to understand unconditional love. I argue that one is impossible (i.e., no one could love that way) and the other is probably irrational. This has important consequences in a variety of domains. Social policies have been derided on the grounds that they undermine unconditional love, and it has been called "possibly the most valuable aspect of the Christian tradition". The works of Robert Nozick, Elizabeth Anderson, and Richard Taylor on this topic are examined and criticized.
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  4. Diane Jeske (2011). Comments on Andrew I. Cohen's "Examining the Bonds and Bounds of Friendship". In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love: 1993-2003. Rodopi.
  5. Tanya Loughead (2008). Shall I Love You as My Brother? Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 82:189-201.
    This essay begins with a perceived problem found in Maurice Blanchot’s work, namely that, while on the one hand, love as we find it in friendship is based upon the separation of two people, a distance which can never be erased; on the other hand, Blanchot makes a comment in a letter to the effect that ‘the Jews are our brothers,’ indicating a love based upon the familial bond, or closeness. This would seem (to some readers, such as Jacques Derrida) (...)
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  6. David Mertz (2011). Whither Romantic Love. In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love: 1993-2003. Rodopi.
  7. Kathy Rudy (2012). Lgbtq…Z? Hypatia 27 (3):601-615.
    In this essay, I draw the discourses around bestiality/zoophilia into the realm of queer theory in order to point to a new form of animal advocacy, something that might be called, in shorthand, loving animals. My argument is quite simple: if all interdicts against bestiality depend on a firm notion of exactly what sex is (and they do), and if queer theory disrupts that firm foundation by arguing that sexuality is impossible to define beforehand and pervades many different kinds of (...)
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  8. Peter M. Schuller (1996). Sexual Love and Western Morality. Teaching Philosophy 19 (2):173-178.
  9. Alan Soble (2000). The Coherence of Love. Philosophy and Theology 12 (2):293-315.
    I examine three common beliefs about love: constancy, exclusivity, and the claim that love is a response to the properties of the beloved. Following a discussion of their relative consistency, I argue that neither the constancy nor the exclusivity of love are saved by the contrary belief, that love is not (entirely) a response to the properties of the beloved.
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  10. William O. Stephens (2011). Can a Stoic Love? In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love: 1993-2003. Rodopi.