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Classical Music
  1. Daniel Albright (2000). Untwisting the Serpent: Modernism in Music, Literature, and Other Arts. University of Chicago Press.
    From its dissonant musics to its surrealist spectacles (the urinal is a violin!), Modernist art often seems to give more frustration than pleasure to its audience. In Untwisting the Serpent, Daniel Albright shows that this perception arises partly because we usually consider each art form in isolation, even though many of the most important artistic experiments of the Modernists were collaborations involving several media--Igor Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring is a ballet, Gertrude Stein's Four Saints in Three Acts is an (...)
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  2. Nora M. Alter & Lutz P. Koepnick (eds.) (2004). Sound Matters: Essays on the Acoustics of Modern German Culture. Berghahn Books.
    ... composed by Herms Niel as a Durchhaltefanfare, a fanfare of perseverance, for the German troops that had been surrounded on the Crimea peninsula by ...
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  3. Violaine Anger & Jan Willem Noldus (eds.) (2005). Le Sens de la Musique: 1750-1900: Vivaldi, Beethoven, Berlioz, Liszt, Debussy, Stravinski. Rue D'Ulm.
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  4. F. G. Asenjo (1966). Polarity and Atonalism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 25 (1):47-52.
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  5. Daniel Barenboim (2009). Music Quickens Time. Verso.
    In this eloquent book, Daniel Barenboim draws on his profound and uniquely influential engagement with music to argue for its central importance in our everyday lives.
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  6. Daniel Barenboim (2008). Everything is Connected: The Power of Music. Weidenfeld & Nicolson.
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  7. John H. Baron (1973). A. W. Schlegel's Mystic Principle and the Music of Beethoven. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 31 (4):531-537.
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  8. Carolyn Beckingham (2009). Moribund Music: Can Classical Music Be Saved? Sussex Academic Press.
    What's wrong with music? -- A century of cultural earthquakes -- Crossover music : help or hindrance? -- Opera : a special case? -- Are schools the solution? -- Where do we go from here?
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  9. Mark Berry (2002). Music, Postmodernism, and George Rochberg's Third String Quartet. In Judith Irene Lochhead & Joseph Henry Auner (eds.), Postmodern Music/Postmodern Thought. Routledge. 235--248.
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  10. Tom Cochrane (2010). Using the Persona to Express Complex Emotions in Music. Music Analysis 29 (1-3):264-275.
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  11. Stephen Davies (1999). Rock Versus Classical Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (2):193-204.
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  12. Eduardo de La Fuente (2010). Paradoxes of Communication: The Case of Modern Classical Music. Empedocles 1 (2):237-250.
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  13. A. Edgar (2012). Who Needs Classical Music? Cultural Choice and Musical Value. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (2):209-211.
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  14. Joshua Fineberg (2006). Classical Music Why Bother?: Hearing the World of Contemporary Culture Through a Composer's Ears. Routledge.
    The famous quip "I don't know much about art, but I know what I like" sums up many people's ideas about how to judge a work of art; but there are inherent limitations if we rely on immediate impressions in judging what should be enduring products of our culture. While some might criticize this as a return to "elitism," Joshua Fineberg argues that without some way of determining intrinsic value, there can be no movement forward for creators or their audience. (...)
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  15. Andy Hamilton & Roger Scruton (1999). The Aesthetics of Western Art Music. Philosophical Books 40 (3):145-159.
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  16. Julian Johnson (2002). Who Needs Classical Music?: Cultural Choice and Musical Value. Oxford University Press.
    During the last few decades, most cultural critics have come to agree that the division between "high" and "low" art is an artificial one, that Beethoven's Ninth and "Blue Suede Shoes" are equally valuable as cultural texts. In Who Needs Classical Music?, Julian Johnson challenges these assumptions about the relativism of cultural judgements. The author maintains that music is more than just "a matter of taste": while some music provides entertainment, or serves as background noise, other music claims to function (...)
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  17. Estelle Ruth Jorgensen (2003). Western Classical Music and General Education. Philosophy of Music Education Review 11 (2):130-140.
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  18. Jennifer Judkins (2008). Why Classical Music Still Mattersby Kramer, Lawrence. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):418-419.
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  19. Andrew Kania (2010). Silent Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (4):343-353.
    In this essay, I investigate musical silence. I first discuss how to integrate the concept of silence into a general theory or definition of music. I then consider the possibility of an entirely silent musical piece. I begin with John Cage’s 4′33″, since it is the most notorious candidate for a silent piece of music, even though it is not, in fact, silent. I conclude that it is not music either, but I argue that it is a piece of non-musical (...)
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  20. Andrew Kania (2009). Musical Recordings. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):22-38.
    In this article, I first consider the metaphysics of musical recordings: their variety, repeatability, and transparency. I then turn to evaluative or aesthetic issues, such as the relative virtues of recordings and live performances, in light of the metaphysical discussion.
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  21. Peter Kivy (2009). Fictional Form and Symphonic Structure: An Essay in Comparative Aesthetics. Ratio 22 (4):421-438.
    It is agreed on all hands that both fictional narratives and the familiar genres of classical music possess an inner structure that both can be perceived and be appreciated aesthetically. It is my argument here that this inner structure plays a crucially different role in fictional narrative than it does in classical music, confining myself here to 'absolute music' (which is to say, pure instrumental music without text, programme, dramatic setting, or other 'extra-musical' content). The argument, basically, is that whereas (...)
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  22. Michael Leslie Klein (2005). Intertextuality in Western Art Music. Indiana University Press.
    Eco, Chopin, and the limits of intertextuality -- The appeal to structure -- On codes, topics, and leaps of interpretation -- Bloom, Freud, and Riffaterre : influence and intertext as signs of the uncanny -- Narrative and intertext : the logic of suffering in Lutosawski's Symphony no. 4.
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  23. Jonathan A. Neufeld (2012). Critical Performances. Teorema (3):89-104.
    Philosophers of music commonly distinguish performative from critical interpretations. I would like to suggest that the distinction between critical and performative interpretations is well captured by an analogy to legal critics and judges. This parallel draws attention to several features of performative interpretation that are typically overlooked, and deemphasizes epistemic problems with performative interpretations that I believe are typically blown out of proportion and ultimately fail to capture interesting features of performative interpretation. There is an important distinction to be made (...)
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  24. Jonathan A. Neufeld (2011). Living the Work: Meditations on a Lark. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (1):89-106.
    Imagine that a performer is confronted with the following decision. After working on a piece for several weeks—practicing, analyzing, listening to various recordings, perhaps reading a bit about it—a performer comes to a crossroads. It seems to him that changing a few crucial interrelated passages can generate two very different performative interpretations. One makes the piece sound animated, lively, and interesting; the other makes the piece sound repetitive, flat, and perhaps even boring. While the performer can understand why one would (...)
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  25. Alexander Rehding (2009). Music and Monumentality: Commemoration and Wonderment in Nineteenth Century Germany. OUP USA.
    A few weeks after the reunification of Germany, Leonard Bernstein raised his baton above the ruins of the Berlin Wall and conducted a special arrangement of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. The central statement of the work, that "all men will be brothers," captured the sentiment of those who saw a brighter future for the newly reunited nation. This now-iconic performance is a palpable example of "musical monumentality" - a significant concept which underlies our cultural and ideological understanding of Western art music (...)
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  26. Michael Spitzer (2004). Metaphor and Musical Thought. University of Chicago Press.
    "The scholarship of Michael Spitzer's new book is impressive and thorough. The writing is impeccable and the coverage extensive. The book treats the history of the use of metaphor in the field of classical music. It also covers a substantial part of the philosophical literature. The book treats the topic of metaphor in a new and extremely convincing manner."-Lydia Goehr, Columbia University The experience of music is an abstract and elusive one, enough so that we're often forced to describe it (...)
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Folk Music
  1. Philip Alperson, B. E. N. Chí & To Ngoc Thanh (2007). The Sounding of the World: Aesthetic Reflections on Traditional Gong Music of Vietnam. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (1):11–20.
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  2. Godfrey Baldacchino (ed.) (2011). Island Songs: A Global Repertoire. Scarecrow Press.
    "Through the close analysis of musical performance and tradition, the scholarly contributiors to Island Songs provide a global review of how island songs, their lyrics, and their singers engage with the challenges of modernity, migration , ...
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Jazz
  1. Philip Alperson (1984). On Musical Improvisation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (1):17-29.
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  2. Bruce Ellis Benson (2008). Stealing Licks : Recording and Identity in Jazz. In Mine Doğantan (ed.), Recorded Music: Philosophical and Critical Reflections. Middlesex University Press.
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  3. Bruce Ellis Benson (2003). The Improvisation of Musical Dialogue: A Phenomenology of Music. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is an important contribution to the philosophy of music. Whereas most books in this field focus on the creation and reproduction of music, Bruce Benson's concern is the phenomenology of music making as an activity. He offers the radical thesis that it is improvisation that is primary in the moment of music making. Succinct and lucid, the book brings together a wide range of musical examples from classical music, jazz, early music and other genres. It offers a rich (...)
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  4. Lee B. Brown (2008). Art From Start to Finish: Jazz, Painting, Writing, and Other Improvisations Edited by Becker, Howard S., Robert R. Faulkner, and Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (2):205–208.
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  5. Lee B. Brown (2002). Jazz: America's Classical Music? Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):157-172.
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  6. Lee B. Brown (2000). "Feeling My Way": Jazz Improvisation and its Vicissitudes-a Plea for Imperfection. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):113-123.
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  7. Lee B. Brown (1999). Postmodernist Jazz Theory: Afrocentrism, Old and New. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (2):235-246.
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  8. Lee B. Brown (1991). The Theory of Jazz Music "It Don't Mean a Thing...". Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (2):115-127.
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  9. James Buhler (2006). Frankfurt School Blues : Rethinking Adorno's Critique of Jazz. In Berthold Hoeckner (ed.), Apparitions: New Perspectives on Adorno and Twentieth Century Music. Routledge.
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  10. John M. Carvalho (2010). Repetition and Self-Realization in Jazz Improvisation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):285-290.
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  11. Ann Chinnery (2003). Aesthetics of Surrender: Levinas and the Disruption of Agency in Moral Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (1):5-17.
    Education has long been charged with the taskof forming and shaping subjectivity andidentity. However, the prevailing view ofeducation as a project of producing rationalautonomous subjects has been challenged bypostmodern and poststructuralist critiques ofsubstantial subjectivity. In a similar vein,Emmanuel Levinas inverts the traditionalconception of subjectivity, claiming that weare constituted as subjects only in respondingto the other. In other words, subjectivity isderivative of an existentially priorresponsibility to and for the other. Hisconception of ethical responsibility is thusalso a radical departure from the prevailingview (...)
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  12. Gregory Clark (2010). Rhetorical Experience and the National Jazz Museum in Harlem. In Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.), Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press.
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  13. Tom Cochrane (2008). Expression and Extended Cognition. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):59-73.
    I argue for the possibility of an extremely intimate connection between the emotional content of the music and the emotional state of the person who produces that music. Under certain specified conditions, the music may not just influence, but also partially constitute the musician’s emotional state.
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  14. William Day (2000). Knowing as Instancing: Jazz Improvisation and Moral Perfectionism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):99-111.
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  15. Gerard Delanty (ed.) (2004). Theodor W. Adorno. Sage.
    Theodor W.Adorno was one of the towering intellectuals of the twentieth century. His contributions cover such a myriad of fields, including the sociology of culture, social theory, the philosophy of music, ethics, art and aesthetics, film, ideology, the critique of modernity and musical composition, that it is difficult to assimilate the sheer range and profundity of his achievement. His celebrated friendship with Walter Benjamin has produced some of the most moving and insightful correspondence on the origins and objects of the (...)
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  16. Theodore Gracyk (2002). Jazz After Jazz : Ken Burns and the Construction of Jazz History. Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):173-187.
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  17. Garry Hagberg (2002). On Representing Jazz: An Art Form in Need of Understanding. Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):188-198.
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  18. Garry L. Hagberg (2008). Jazz Improvisation and Ethical Interaction : A Sketch of the Connections. In Garry Hagberg (ed.), Art and Ethical Criticism. Blackwell Pub..
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  19. Berthold Hoeckner (ed.) (2006). Apparitions: New Perspectives on Adorno and Twentieth Century Music. Routledge.
    Apparitions takes a new look at the critical legacy of one of the 20th century's most important and influential thinkers about music, Theodor W. Adorno. Bringing together an international group of scholars, the book offers new historical and critical insights into Adorno's theories of music and how these theories, in turn, have affected the study of contemporary art music, popular music, and jazz. The essays review the impact of Philosophy of New Music a fter World War II, examine Adorno's struggle (...)
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  20. Neil P. Hurley (1969). Toward a Sociology of Jazz. Thought 44 (2):219-246.
    A lively and scholarly analysis of the history of jazz in its long voyage from a New Orleans barrel-house type of enterprise to global acceptance.
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  21. Gary Iseminger (2010). Sonicism and Jazz Improvisation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):297-299.
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  22. Andrew Kania (2011). All Play and No Work: An Ontology of Jazz. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4):391-403.
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