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  1. Philip Alperson (1998). Improvisation: An Overview. In Michael Kelly (ed.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press. 2--478.
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  2. Frank J. Barrett (2000). Cultivating an Aesthetic of Unfolding: Jazz Improvisation as a Self-Organizing System. In Stephen Linstead & Heather Höpfl (eds.), The Aesthetics of Organization. Sage Publications. 228--45.
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  3. Bruce Ellis Benson (2006). The Fundamental Heteronomy of Jazz Improvisation. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 4:453-467.
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  4. Bruce Ellis Benson (2005). Jazz: l'Autre exotique. Horizons Philosophiques 16 (1):86-100.
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  5. Chairperson Zdravko Blažekovíc & Mel van Elteren (2008). Dutch Youth and Rock Music in the Fin de Siècle Era. The European Legacy 2 (1):133-142.
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  6. Zdravko Blažekovíc & Mel van Elteren (1997). Dutch Youth and Rock Music in the Fin de Siècle Era. The European Legacy 2 (1):133-142.
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  7. L. B. Brown (2011). Improvisation. In Theodore Gracyk & Andrew Kania (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Music. Routledge. 59--69.
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  8. Franklin Bruno (2013). A Case for Song: Against an (Exclusively) Recording-Centered Ontology of Rock. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (1):65-74.
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  9. Yves Citton (2004). L'utopie Jazz entre gratuité et liberté. Multitudes 2 (2):131-144.
    This article explores the intersection between freedom-liberty and freedom-gratuity in the practices filed under the heading «free jazz ». In light of the exemplary trajectory of Ken Vandermark, it analyses the space of freedom opened up by US college radios for the dissemination of improvised music. It then sketches the socio-political model implicitly projected by this unique form of interactive invention taking place within the collective of a jazz band, an interactive invention which dissolves the very notion of authorship. Rejecting (...)
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  10. Vincent Colapietro (2012). Jazz as Metaphor, Philosophy as Jazz. In Cornelis De Waal & Krzysztof Piotr Skowroński (eds.), The Normative Thought of Charles S. Peirce. Fordham University Press. 1.
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  11. Francisco Sasseti da Mota (2012). "Is the Moral Criticism of Popular Songs Appropriate at All?": Remarks on Popular Music, Aristotle and MacIntyre. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 68 (1):295-312.
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  12. Misa Djurkovic (2004). Ideological and Political Conflicts About Popular Music in Serbia. Filozofija I Društvo 25:271-284.
    The paper is focused on ideological and political conflicts about popular music in Serbia, as a good example of wrong and confused searching for identity. Basic conflict that author is analyzing is about oriental elements and the question if they are legitimate parts of Serbian musical heritage or not. Author is making an analysis of three periods in twentieth century, in which absolutely the same arguments were used, and he's paying special attention to contemporary conflicts, trying to explain why all (...)
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  13. Julian Dodd (2014). Upholding Standards: A Realist Ontology of Standard Form Jazz. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (3):277-290.
    In “All Play and No Work,” Andrew Kania claims that standard form jazz involves no works, only performances. This article responds to Kania by defending one of the alternative ontological proposals that he rejects, namely, that jazz works are ontologically continuous with works of classical music. I call this alternative “the standard view,” and I argue that it is the default position in the ontology of standard form jazz. Kania has three objections to the standard view. The bulk of the (...)
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  14. Alexis Dubourdieu & Jane Ward (2012). Developing Awareness of Cultural Music and its Role in Society with Sound Infusion. Ethos 20 (2):8.
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  15. Simon Frith (1998). Performing Rites: Evaluating Popular Music. Oup Oxford.
    Who's better? Billie Holiday or P. J. Harvey? Blur or Oasis? Dylan or Keats? And how many friendships have ridden on the answer? Such questions aren't merely the stuff of fanzines and idle talk; they inform our most passionate arguments, distil our most deeply held values, make meaning of our ever-changing culture. In Performing Rites, one of the most influential writers on popular music asks what we talk about when we talk about music. What's good, what's bad? What's high, what's (...)
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  16. Waldo Garrido & Philip Hayward (2011). Chiloé : An Offshore Song Culture. In Godfrey Baldacchino (ed.), Island Songs: A Global Repertoire. Scarecrow Press.
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  17. John C. Gilmour (2000). Improvisation in Cézanne's Late Landscapes. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):191-204.
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  18. Theodore Gracyk (2013). On Music. Routledge.
    Opinionated and example-filled, this extremely concise and accessible book provides a survey of some fundamental and longstanding debates about the nature of music. The central arguments and ideas of historical and contemporary philosophers are presented with the goal of making them as accessible as possible to general readers who have no background in philosophy. The emphasis is on instrumental music, but examples are drawn from many cultures as well as from Western classical, jazz, folk, and popular music.
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  19. Theodore Gracyk (1999). Valuing and Evaluating Popular Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (2):205-220.
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  20. Garry Hagberg (2006). Jazz Improvisation : A Mimetic Art ? Revue Internationale de Philosophie 4:469-485.
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  21. Garry Hagberg (2000). Foreword: Improvisation in the Arts. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):95-97.
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  22. Garry Hagberg (1998). Improvisation: Jazz Improvisation. In Michael Kelly (ed.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press. 1--479.
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  23. William J. Harris (1985). The Poetry and Poetics of Amiri Baraka the Jazz Aesthetic. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  24. Frank Howes (1962). A Critique of Folk, Popular and ‘Art’ Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 2 (3):239-248.
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  25. David E. Isaacs (2010). We Have No Trouble Here' : Considering Nazi Motifs in The Sound of Music and Cabaret. In Nancy Billias (ed.), Promoting and Producing Evil. Rodopi. 63--179.
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  26. Werner Jauk (2009). Pop/Music + Medien/Kunst: Der Musikalisierte Alltag der Digital Culture. Electronic Publishing.
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  27. R. Kaur & P. Banerjea (2000). Jazzgeist: Racial Signs of Twisted Times. Theory, Culture and Society 17 (3):159-180.
    This article investigates the changing currency of racial politics in jazz music formations, with a comparative focus on Nazi and contemporary Germany. While it is noted that music articulates politics in an oblique or metonymic way, in highly-charged contexts music is lent further propositional capacity. This is highlighted in Nazi Germany where jazz music was seen as barbaric, `dark' and uncivilized, and classical music represented order and cultural supremacy. These dynamics continue but, often, in a slightly askew form for contemporary (...)
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  28. Thomas Kocherhans (2012). Improvisation as Liberation: Endeavours of Resistance in Free Jazz. Cuadernos de Filosofía Latinoamericana 33 (106):39-52.
    This investigation seeks to explore connection points between music and societal processes, by linking improvised music to cultural networks and social practices. Exceeding musicological and action-theoretical reflections, the improvisation is regarded from a cultural sociological perspective, which asks how improvisational practices can be integrated into cultural, historical and discursive contexts. Taking free jazz as the scope of the investigation, it is argued that there is a necessity to discuss its characteristic improvisation, in connection to the critical, radical and aesthetical practices (...)
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  29. Angela M. Leonard (1997). Exploratory Notes on the 'Wonders' of Jazz. Semiotics:181-191.
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  30. Angela M. Leonard (1997). Exploratory Notes on the 'Wonders' of Jazz. Semiotics:181-191.
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  31. Jerrold Levinson (2013). Jazz Vocal Interpretation: A Philosophical Analysis. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (1):35-43.
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  32. John Mizzoni (2006). Teaching Moral Philosophy with Popular Music. Teaching Ethics 6 (2):15-28.
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  33. Perloff Nancy (2002). The Right to Be Myself, as Long as I Live! As If I Were a Sound.": Postmodernism and the Music of John Cage”. In Johannes Willem Bertens & Joseph P. Natoli (eds.), Postmodernism: The Key Figures. Blackwell Publishers.
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  34. Karl Popper & Divine Radiance (2005). ADORNO, THEODOR W.(Trans. By Anne G. Mitchell and Wesley V. Blomster). Philosophy of Modern Music. Continuum. 2003. Pp. 220.£ 14.99. BERUBE, MICHAEL (Ed.). The Aesthetics of Cultural Studies. Blackwell Publishing. 2004. Pp. 208. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (1).
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  35. Jesse Prinz (2014). The Aesthetics of Punk Rock. Philosophy Compass 9 (9):583-593.
    Philosophers should listen to punk rock. Though largely ignored in analytic aesthetics, punk can shed light on the nature, limits, and value of art. Here, I will begin with an overview of punk aesthetics and then extrapolate two lessons. First, punk intentionally violates widely held aesthetic norms, thus raising questions about the plasticity of taste. Second, punk music is associated with accompanying visual styles, fashion, and attitudes; this points to a relationship between art and identity. Together, these lessons suggest that (...)
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  36. Michael Rings (2013). Doing It Their Way: Rock Covers, Genre, and Appreciation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (1):55-63.
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  37. Gilbert Ryle (1976). Improvisation. Mind 85 (337):69-83.
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  38. Pierre Sauvanet (2011). Le pouvoir paradoxal du batteur de jazz. Multitudes 3:207-210.
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  39. Laura Schroeter & François Schroeter (2014). Jazz Redux: A Reply to Möller. Philosophical Studies 170 (2):303-316.
    This paper is a response to Niklas Möller’s (Philosophical Studies, 2013) recent criticism of our relational (Jazz) model of meaning of thin evaluative terms. Möller’s criticism rests on a confusion about the role of coordinating intentions in Jazz. This paper clarifies what’s distinctive and controversial about the Jazz proposal and explains why Jazz, unlike traditional accounts of meaning, is not committed to analycities.
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  40. K. Snell (2009). Democracy and Popular Music in Music Education. In June Countryman & Elizabeth Gould (eds.), Exploring Social Justice: How Music Education Might Matter. Canadian Music Educators' Association = Association Canadienne des Musiciens Éducateurs. 166--183.
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  41. J. Stratton (1989). Beyond Art: Postmodernism and the Case of Popular Music. Theory, Culture and Society 6 (1):31-57.
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  42. Scott Streiner (2001). Shooting and Crying: The Emergence of Protest in Israeli Popular Music. The European Legacy 6 (6):771-792.
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  43. David Sudnow & Hubert L. Dreyfus (2001). Ways of the Hand: A Rewritten Account. The Mit Press.
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  44. Ken Vandermark (2004). Echos d'un jazz libre d'Amérique. Multitudes 2 (2):157-166.
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  45. Clinton J. Walker, Trevor Hogan & Peter Beilharz (2012). Rock 'N' Labels: Tracking the Australian Recording Industry in 'The Vinyl Age' Part Two: 1970–1995, and After. Thesis Eleven 110 (1):112-131.
    Over the past 50 years, rock music has been the prime mover of an emergent national recording industry in Australia. This is a story in turn of increasing size, complexity, diversity, and sophistication, before its ultimate decline into the 21st century. This story has not been told in full previously and this article is a first step to make good this gap in the historical and cultural sociology of popular music. In this study, which has two parts, we survey record (...)
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  46. William Weber (2005). Who Needs Classical Music? Cultural Choice and Musical Value. Common Knowledge 11 (3):499-500.
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  47. Oli Wilson (2011). Papua New Guinea : Popular Music and the Continuity of Tradition : An Ethnographic Study of Songs by the Band Paramana Strangers. In Godfrey Baldacchino (ed.), Island Songs: A Global Repertoire. Scarecrow Press. 119.
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Classical Music
  1. Daniel Albright (2000). Untwisting the Serpent: Modernism in Music, Literature, and Other Arts. University of Chicago Press.
    From its dissonant musics to its surrealist spectacles (the urinal is a violin!), Modernist art often seems to give more frustration than pleasure to its audience. In Untwisting the Serpent, Daniel Albright shows that this perception arises partly because we usually consider each art form in isolation, even though many of the most important artistic experiments of the Modernists were collaborations involving several media--Igor Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring is a ballet, Gertrude Stein's Four Saints in Three Acts is an (...)
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  2. Nora M. Alter & Lutz P. Koepnick (eds.) (2004). Sound Matters: Essays on the Acoustics of Modern German Culture. Berghahn Books.
    ... composed by Herms Niel as a Durchhaltefanfare, a fanfare of perseverance, for the German troops that had been surrounded on the Crimea peninsula by ...
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  3. Violaine Anger & Jan Willem Noldus (eds.) (2005). Le Sens de la Musique: 1750-1900: Vivaldi, Beethoven, Berlioz, Liszt, Debussy, Stravinski. Rue D'Ulm.
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