Bookmark and Share

Virtue Ethics

Edited by Jason Kawall (Colgate University)
About this topic
Key works The essential work inspiring much of the virtue ethics tradition is Aristotle 2006.  Many consider David Hume 1751 and Adam Smith 1759) to provide important, sentimentalist virtue ethics in the early modern period.  Contemporary interest in virtue ethics is often traced to Elizabeth Anscombe's [Anscombe 1958: Modern Moral Philosophy 1958.  In the following decades key contemporary works appeared including Foot 1978, Pincoffs 1971, w#, Hursthouse, Slote, Swanton
  Show all references
Related categories
Subcategories:History/traditions: Virtue Ethics
954 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 954
Material to categorize
  1. Aristóteles (2009). Virtues and Vices. Discusiones Filosóficas 10 (14):133-145.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Donald C. Abel (1993). Pagan Virtue. Review of Metaphysics 46 (4):840-841.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Harold Alderman (1982). By Virtue of a Virtue. Review of Metaphysics 36 (1):127 - 153.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. John Anderson (1934). Virtue. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):224 – 228.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Nomy Arpaly (2014). Duty, Desire and the Good Person: Towards a Non‐Aristotelian Account of Virtue. Philosophical Perspectives 28 (1):59-74.
    This paper presents an account of the virtuous person, which I take to be the same as the good person. I argue that goodness in a person is based on her desires. Contra Aristotelians, I argue that one does not need wisdom to be good. There can be a perfectly good person with mental retardation or autism. Contra Kantians, I argue that the sense of duty - which does exist! - is compatible with a desire-based moral psychology.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Celso Martins Azar Filho (2007). The Cannibal Virtue. In Corinne Noirot-Maguire & Valérie M. Dionne (eds.), Revelations of Character: Ethos, Rhetoric, and Moral Philosophy in Montaigne. Cambridge Scholars Pub.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Richard Bourne (2014). Communication, Punishment, and Virtue. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (1):78-107.
    This essay suggests that while Antony Duff's model of criminal punishment as secular penance is pregnant with possibilities for theological reception and reflection, it proceeds by way of a number of separations that are brought into question by the penitential traditions of Christianity. The first three of these—between justice and mercy, censure and invitation, and state and victim, constrain the true communicative character of his account of punishment. The second set of oppositions, between sacrament and virtue, interior character and external (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Michael S. Brady (2010). Virtue, Emotion, and Attention. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):115-131.
    The perceptual model of emotions maintains that emotions involve, or are at least analogous to, perceptions of value. On this account, emotions purport to tell us about the evaluative realm, in much the same way that sensory perceptions inform us about the sensible world. An important development of this position, prominent in recent work by Peter Goldie amongst others, concerns the essential role that virtuous habits of attention play in enabling us to gain perceptual and evaluative knowledge. I think that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Geoffrey Brennan & Alan Hamlin, Economizing on Virtue.
    Our central aim is to explore the ideas involved in the claim that certain institutional structures economize on virtue and, in particular, to explore the widely held idea that reliance on institutions that economize on virtue may undermine virtue itself. We explore these ideas both by discussing alternative conceptions of virtue and economizing, and by constructing a simple model of the relationship between a specific institutional structure that may be said to economize on virtue and the emergence of virtue. "There (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Scott Breuninger (2010). Recovering Bishop Berkeley: Virtue and Society in the Anglo-Irish Context. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Berkeley's sermons on passive obedience in the Irish context -- Science and sociability: Berkeley's "bond of society" -- Piety, perception, and the free-thinkers -- Luxury, moderation, and the south sea bubble -- Planting religion in the New World, 1722 - 1732 -- Improving Ireland: luxury, virtue, and economic development -- Bishop of Cloyne: protestantism, patriotism, and a national panacea.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. David S. Bright, Bradley A. Winn & Jason Kanov (2013). Reconsidering Virtue: Differences of Perspective in Virtue Ethics and the Positive Social Sciences. Journal of Business Ethics 119 (4):1-16.
    This paper describes differences in two perspectives on the idea of virtue as a theoretical foundation for positive organizational ethics (POE). The virtue ethics perspective is grounded in the philosophical tradition, has classical roots, and focuses attention on virtue as a property of character. The positive social science perspective is a recent movement (e.g., positive psychology and positive organizational scholarship) that has implications for POE. The positive social science movement operationalizes virtue through an empirical lens that emphasizes virtuous behaviors. From (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Towards a Eudaimonistic Virtue Epistemology. In Abrol Fairweather (ed.), Naturalizing Virtue Epistemology. Synthese Library
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. F. F. Centore (2002). Hursthouse, Rosalind. On Virtue Ethics. Review of Metaphysics 56 (1):178-179.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Julián Carvajal Cordón (2007). La Virtud En El Contexto Del Formalismo Ético. Convivium 20:113-144.
    The author analyses the sense of virtue at the very heart of Kantian ethical formalism. First, he verifies the difficulty of placing Kantian ethics in one of the three models developed in the history of Western ethics – prescriptive, intentional and virtue ethics –, insofar as Kant places in the centre of moral analysis the notion of “imperative” (a precept), whose function is to show the purity of the “intention” as the only moral value, which deploys in a doctrine of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Hugh Curtler (1994). Can Virtue Be Taught? Humanitas 7 (1):43-50.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Ricardo Da Costa (2003). Um Espelho de Príncipes Artístico E Profano: A Representação Das Virtudes Do Bom Governo E Os Vícios Do Mau Governo Nos Afrescos de Ambrogio Lorenzetti (C. 1290-1348?). [REVIEW] Utopía y Praxis Latinoamericana 8 (23):55-72.
    This article analyses some frescoes painted by Ambrogio Lorenzetti entitled the Allegory of Good and Bad Government under the hypothesis that they are the artistic and profane Princes Mirrors. The virtues of Good Government and the vices of tiranny are represented as they appear in the frescoes of..
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Charles Daubeny (1815). In Philosophia, Quæmoralis Dicitur, Tractanda, Quæam Sit Præipue Aristotelicædisciplinævirtus? Dissertatio Latina Cancellari Præio Dignata Et in Theatro Oxoniensi Habita, Die Jun. Viimo. 1815. [Printed by S. Collingwood].
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Phillip Deen (forthcoming). What Moral Virtues Are Required to Recognize Irony? Journal of Value Inquiry:1-17.
    The Onion, a widely known satirical newspaper, frequently finds its articles taken as the literal truth. One article from May 2011, “Planned Parenthood Opens $8 Billion Abortionplex,” featured teenage girls gushing over the amusement park amenities like a ten-screen theater, nightclub and “lazy river” and a fake PR representative touting, “Whether she’s a high school junior who doesn’t want to go to prom pregnant, a go-getter professional who can’t be bothered with the time commitment of raising a child, or a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. N. J. H. Dent (1979). WALLACE, JAMES D. "Virtues and Vices". [REVIEW] Philosophy 54:568.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Christos Evangeliou (1983). After Virtue. Review of Metaphysics 37 (1):132-134.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Walter Feinberg (1984). On After Virtue. Theory and Society 13 (2):249-262.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Philippa Foot (1997). Virtues and Vices. In Daniel Statman (ed.), Noûs. Georgetown University Press 163--177.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Phillipa Foot (1997). Virtues and Vices. In Thomas L. Carson & Paul K. Moser (eds.), Morality and the Good Life. OUP Usa
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Daniel C. Fouke (2012). Blameworthy Environmental Beliefs. Environmental Ethics 34 (2):115-134.
    Thomas Hill famously argued that what really bothers us about environmental degradation is best discovered by asking “What kind of person would do such a thing?” Beliefs, some of which are blameworthy, are among the things that define what kind of person one is. What we care about is reflected in whether one’s epistemic practices align with one’s core moral convictions and common standards of decency. Our moral sensitivities are reflected in what we attend to and reflect upon. What we (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Peter A. French, Theodore Edward Uehling & Howard K. Wettstein (1988). Ethical Theory Character and Virtue.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. R. Gaita (1981). WALLACE, J. D. "Virtues and Vices". [REVIEW] Mind 90:139.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Louis Groarke (2001). Freedom, Virtue, and the Common Good. [REVIEW] Maritain Studies/Etudes Maritainiennes 17:130-131.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. George Harris (2004). Review of Christine Swanton, Virtue Ethics: A Pluralistic View, Oxford. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (1).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Andrea Houchard (2003). Christine Swanton, Virtue Ethics: A Pluralistic View. [REVIEW] Vera Lex 4 (1/2):103-108.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Bill Kauffman (1993). The Virtue of Smallness. The Chesterton Review 19 (2):281-282.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Paul Kurtz (1998). The McCarthyites of Virtue. Free Inquiry 19.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. H. A. L. (1950). Reviewed Work: Man as Man: The Science and Art of Ethics by Thomas J. Higgins. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 47 (7):191-192.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Daniel Markovits (2010). Chapter 3. The Seeds of a Lawyerly Virtue. In A Modern Legal Ethics: Adversary Advocacy in a Democratic Age. Princeton University Press 79-100.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Jane Roland Martin (1987). Martial Virtues or Capital Vices. Journal of Thought 22:32-44.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. J. McDowell (1997). Virtues and Vices. In Daniel Statman (ed.), Virtue Ethics. Georgetown University Press 141--162.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jean Porter (2011). Virtues and Vices. In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Jean Porter (2007). Virtue. In Gilbert Meilaender & William Werpehowski (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Theological Ethics. OUP Oxford
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Phyllis Roberts (1996). The Treatise on Vices and Virtues in Latin and the Vernacular. [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (2):471-473.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Guangyu Song (2008). Lun Yu Xin Jie: Cong Xin Xing de Xiu Lian He Ti Wu Tan Suo "Lun Yu" de Zhen Shi Yi Han. Wan Juan Lou Tu Shu Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Robert Sparrow, War Without Virtue?
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Matthias Steup (1999). Virtues of the Mind: An Inquiry Into the Nature of Virtue and the Ethical Foundations of the Mind Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski New York: Cambridge University Press, 1966, Xvi + 365 Pp., $64.95, $19.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (03):619-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Christine Swanton (2014). The Notion of the Moral: The Relation Between Virtue Ethics and Virtue Epistemology. Philosophical Studies 171 (1):121-134.
    In this paper I argue that virtue ethics should be understood as a form of ethics which integrates various domains of the practical in relation to which virtues are excellences. To argue this it is necessary to distinguish two senses of the “moral”: the broad sense which integrates the domains of the practical and a narrow classificatory sense. Virtue ethics, understood as above, believes that all genuine virtue should be understood as what I call virtues proper. To possess a virtue (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Lauren Tillinghast (2008). Virtues and Vices. [REVIEW] Philosophical Practice 3 (2):304-305.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Kevin Timpe & Craig Boyd (eds.) (2014). Virtues and Their Vices. Oxford University Press.
    A comprehensive philosophical treatment of the virtues and their competing vices. The first four sections focus on historical classes of virtue: the cardinal virtues, the capital vices and the corrective virtues, intellectual virtues, and the theological virtues. A final section discusses the role of virtue theory in a number of disciplines.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Jennifer Todd (1982). After Virtue. Philosophical Studies 29:281-286.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. P. K. Wainaina (1988). Can Virtue Be Taught? In J. M. Nyasani (ed.), Philosophical Focus on Culture and Traditional Thought Systems in Development. Konrad Adenauer Foundation 316.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. A. D. M. Walker (1989). Virtue and Character. Philosophy 64 (249):349 - 362.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Varieties of Virtue Ethics
  1. Brenda Almond (2010). The Ethics of Care and Empathy – Michael Slote. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (238):211-213.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Judith Andre (2013). Open Hope as a Civic Virtue. Social Philosophy Today 29:89-100.
    Hope as a virtue is an acquired disposition, shaped by reflection; as a civic virtue it must serve the good of the community. Ernst Bloch and Lord Buddha offer help in constructing such a virtue. Using a taxonomy developed by Darren Webb I distinguish open hope from goal-oriented hope, and use each thinker to develop the former. Bloch and Buddha are very different (and notoriously obscure; I do not attempt an exegesis). But they share a metaphysics of change, foundational for (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Chrisoula Andreou (2005). Review of Phillipa Foot's Natural Goodness (Oxford: Clarendon Press 2001). [REVIEW] Utilitas 17 (3):359-361.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 954