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  1. A. Ahsen (2005). A Second Report on AA-VVIQ: Role of Vivid and Unvivid Images in Consciousness Research. Journal of Mental Imagery 29 (3-4).
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  2. A. Ahsen (1993). Imagery Paradigm: Imaginative Consciousness in the Experimental and Clinical Setting. Journal of Mental Imagery 17 (1-2).
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  3. A. Ahsen (1991). A Second Report on AA-VVIQ: Role of Vivid and Unvivid Images in Consciousness Research. Journal of Mental Imagery 15:1-31.
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  4. A. Ahsen (1991). Imagery and Consciousness: Putting Together Poetic, Mythic and Social Realities. Journal of Mental Imagery 15:63-97.
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  5. Rudolf Arnheim (1994). Consciousness: An Island of Images. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 14 (2):121-27.
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  6. Martha E. Arterberry, Catherine Craver-Lemley & Adam Reeves (2002). Visual Imagery is Not Always Like Visual Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):183-184.
    The “Perky effect” is the interference of visual imagery with vision. Studies of this effect show that visual imagery has more than symbolic properties, but these properties differ both spatially (including “pictorially”) and temporally from those of vision. We therefore reject both the literal picture-in-the-head view and the entirely symbolic view.
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  7. Cordula Becker, Klaus Gramann, Hermann J. Müller & Mark A. Elliott (2009). Electrophysiological Correlates of Flicker-Induced Color Hallucinations. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):266-276.
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  8. F. R. Bichowsky (1926). The Mechanism of Consciousness: Images. American Journal of Psychology 37:557-564.
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  9. Ned Block (2011). Perceptual Consciousness Overflows Cognitive Access. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (12):567-575.
    One of the most important issues concerning the foundations ofconscious perception centerson thequestion of whether perceptual consciousness is rich or sparse. The overflow argument uses a form of ‘iconic memory’ toarguethatperceptual consciousnessisricher (i.e.,has a higher capacity) than cognitive access: when observing a complex scene we are conscious of more than we can report or think about. Recently, the overflow argumenthas been challenged both empirically and conceptually. This paper reviews the controversy, arguing that proponents of sparse perception are committed to the (...)
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  10. Robert Briscoe (2011). Mental Imagery and the Varieties of Amodal Perception. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (2):153-173.
    The problem of amodal perception is the problem of how we represent features of perceived objects that are occluded or otherwise hidden from us. Bence Nanay (2010) has recently proposed that we amodally perceive an object's occluded features by imaginatively projecting them into the relevant regions of visual egocentric space. In this paper, I argue that amodal perception is not a single, unitary capacity. Drawing appropriate distinctions reveals amodal perception to be characterized not only by mental imagery, as Nanay suggests, (...)
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  11. Robert Briscoe (2008). Vision, Action, and Make‐Perceive. Mind and Language 23 (4):457-497.
    In this paper, I critically assess the enactive account of visual perception recently defended by Alva Noë (2004). I argue inter alia that the enactive account falsely identifies an object’s apparent shape with its 2D perspectival shape; that it mistakenly assimilates visual shape perception and volumetric object recognition; and that it seriously misrepresents the constitutive role of bodily action in visual awareness. I argue further that noticing an object’s perspectival shape involves a hybrid experience combining both perceptual and imaginative elements (...)
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  12. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Seeing as a Non-Experiental Mental State: The Case From Synesthesia and Visual Imagery. In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Neuroscience Series, Synthese Library.
    The paper argues that the English verb ‘to see’ can denote three different kinds of conscious states of seeing, involving visual experiences, visual seeming states and introspective seeming states, respectively. The case for the claim that there are three kinds of seeing comes from synesthesia and visual imagery. Synesthesia is a relatively rare neurological condition in which stimulation in one sensory or cognitive stream involuntarily leads to associated experiences in a second unstimulated stream. Visual synesthesia is often considered a case (...)
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  13. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Varieties of Synesthetic Experience. In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Neuroscience Series, Synthese Library.
    In her response to my "Seeing as a Non-Experiental Mental State: The Case from Synesthesia and Visual Imagery" Ophelia Deroy presents an argument for an interesting new account of synesthesia. On this account, synesthesia can be thought of as "a perceptual state (e.g. of a letter)" that is "changed or enriched by the incorporation of a conscious mental image (e.g. a color)." I reply that while this is a plausible account of some types of synesthesia, some forms cannot be accounted (...)
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  14. Carmelo Calì (2005). Husserl and the Phenomenological Description of Imagery: Some Issues for the Cognitive Sciences? ARHE 2 (4):25-37.
    This paper deals with two theories Husserl worked out on imagery in order to see if the properties a phenomenological description ascribes to imagery are fit to give meaningful constraints upon theoretical models that guide empirical research. Husserlian descriptions and Kosslyn and colleagues models are hence compared as to their explanatory strategy and implications.
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  15. Edward S. Casey (1971). Imagination: Imagining and the Image. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 31 (June):475-490.
  16. Jonathan Cole (2005). Imagination After Neurological Losses of Movement and Sensation: The Experience of Spinal Cord Injury. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):183-195.
    To what extent is imagination dependent on embodied experience? In attempting to answer such questions I consider the experiences of those who have to come to terms with altered neurological function, namely those with spinal cord injury at the neck. These people have each lost all sensation and movement below the neck. How might these new ways of living affect their imagination?
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  17. Andreas Elpidorou (2010). Imagination in Non-Representational Painting. In Jonathan Webber (ed.), Reading Sartre: On Phenomenology and Existentialism. Routledge.
  18. Ann Garry (1977). Mental Images. Personalist 58 (January):28-38.
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  19. Christopher Gauker (2011). Words and Images: An Essay on the Origin of Ideas. Oxford University Press.
    At least since Locke, philosophers and psychologists have usually held that concepts arise out of sensory perceptions, thoughts are built from concepts, and language enables speakers to convey their thoughts to hearers. Christopher Gauker holds that this tradition is mistaken about both concepts and language. The mind cannot abstract the building blocks of thoughts from perceptual representations. More generally, we have no account of the origin of concepts that grants them the requisite independence from language. Gauker's alternative is to show (...)
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  20. Tamar Szabó Gendler (2006). Imaginative Contagion. Metaphilosophy 37 (2):183-203.
    The aim of this article is to expand the diet of examples considered in philosophical discussions of imagination and pretense, and to offer some preliminary observations about what we might learn about the nature of imagination as a result. The article presents a number of cases involving imaginative contagion: cases where merely imagining or pretending that P has effects that we would expect only perceiving or believing that P to have. Examples are offered that involve visual imagery, motor imagery, fictional (...)
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  21. Dominic Gregory (2010). Pictures, Pictorial Contents and Vision. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):15-32.
    Certain simple thoughts about pictures suggest that the contents of pictures are closely bound to vision. But how far can the striking features of depiction be accounted for merely in terms of the especially visual contents which belong to pictures, without considering, for example, any issues concerning the nature of the visual experiences with which pictures provide us? This article addresses that question by providing an account of the distinctively visual contents belonging to pictures, and by using that account to (...)
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  22. Dominic Gregory (2010). Visual Imagery: Visual Format or Visual Content? Mind and Language 25 (4):394-417.
    It is clear that visual imagery is somehow significantly visual. Some theorists, like Kosslyn, claim that the visual nature of visualisations derives from features of the neural processes which underlie those episodes. Pylyshyn claims, however, that it may merely reflect special features of the contents which we grasp when we visualise things. This paper discusses and rejects Pylyshyn's own attempts to identify the respects in which the contents of visualisations are notably visual. It then offers a novel and very different (...)
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  23. Stephen Grossberg (2002). Neural Substrates of Visual Percepts, Imagery, and Hallucinations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):194-195.
    Recent neural models clarify many properties of mental imagery as part of the process whereby bottom-up visual information is influenced by top-down expectations, and how these expectations control visual attention. Volitional signals can transform modulatory top-down signals into supra-threshold imagery. Visual hallucinations can occur when the normal control of these volitional signals is lost.
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  24. Rick Grush (1998). Perception, Imagery, and the Sensorimotor Loop. In F. Esken & F.-D. Heckman (eds.), A Consciousness Reader. Schoeningh Verlag.
    I have argued elsewhere that imagery and represention are best explained as the result of operations of neurally implemented emulators of an agent's body and environment. In this article I extend the theory of emulation to address perceptual processing as well. The key notion will be that of an emulator of an agent's egocentric behavioral space. This emulator, when run off-line, produces mental imagery, including transformations such as visual image rotations. However, while on-line, it is used to process information from (...)
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  25. P. J. Hampson, D. F. Marks & Janet Richardson (eds.) (1990). Imagery: Current Developments. Routledge.
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  26. P. J. Hampson & P. E. Morris (1990). Imagery, Consciousness, and Cognitive Control: The Boss Model Reviewed. In P. J. Hampson, D. F. Marks & Janet Richardson (eds.), Imagery: Current Developments. Routledge.
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  27. D. O. Hebb (1968). Concerning Imagery. Psychological Review 75:466-77.
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  28. Robert Hopkins (2010). Imagination and Affective Response. In Jonathan Webber (ed.), Reading Sartre: On Phenomenology and Existentialism. Routledge.
    What is the relation between affective states, such as emotions and pleasure, and imagining? Do the latter cause the former, just as perceptual states do? Or are the former merely imagined, along with suitable objects? I consider this issue against the backdrop of Sartre’s theory of imagination, and drawing on his highly illuminating discussion of it. I suggest that, while it is commonly assumed that imaginative states cause affective responses much as do perceptions, the alternatives merit more careful consideration than (...)
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  29. Robert Hopkins (2006). With Sight Too Much in Mind, Mind Too Little in Sight? Philosophical Books 47 (4):293-305.
    This is a critical notice of Colin McGinn's 'Mindsight'.
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  30. P. V. Horne (1993). The Nature of Imagery. Consciousness and Cognition 2 (1):58-82.
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  31. Alumit Ishai & D. Sagi (1998). Visual Imagery and Visual Perception: The Role of Memory and Conscious Awareness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press. 2--321.
  32. Robert G. Kunzendorf (1990). The Causal Efficacy of Consciousness in General, Imagery in Particular: A Materialist Perspective. In , Mental Imagery. Plenum Press.
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  33. Robert G. Kunzendorf (ed.) (1990). Mental Imagery. Plenum Press.
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  34. Robert G. Kunzendorf, M. Justice & D. Capone (1997). Conscious Images as "Centrally Excited Sensations": A Developmental Study of Imaginal Influences on the ERG. Journal of Mental Imagery 21:155-66.
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  35. Peter Langland-Hassan (2011). A Puzzle About Visualization. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):145-173.
    Visual imagination (or visualization) is peculiar in being both free, in that what we imagine is up to us, and useful to a wide variety of practical reasoning tasks. How can we rely upon our visualizations in practical reasoning if what we imagine is subject to our whims? The key to answering this puzzle, I argue, is to provide an account of what constrains the sequence in which the representations featured in visualization unfold—an account that is consistent with its freedom. (...)
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  36. Peter Langland‐Hassan (2014). Imaginative Attitudes. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (3).
    The point of this paper is to reveal a dogma in the ordinary conception of sensory imagination, and to suggest another way forward. The dogma springs from two main sources: a too close comparison of mental imagery to perceptual experience, and a too strong division between mental imagery and the traditional propositional attitudes (such as belief and desire). The result is an unworkable conception of the correctness conditions of sensory imaginings—one lacking any link between the conditions under which an imagining (...)
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  37. Daniel Lehmann, B. Henggler, M. Koukkan & M. Michel (1993). Source Localization of Brain Electric Field Frequency Bands During Conscious, Spontaneous Visual Imagery and Abstract Thought. Cognitive Brain Research 1:203-20.
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  38. Fiona Macpherson (2013). The Philosophy and Psychology of Hallucination: An Introduction. In Fiona Macpherson Dimitris Platchias (ed.), Hallucination: Philosophy and Psychology. MIT Press.
    An overview of the philosophy and psychology of hallucination and its relevance to the philosophy of perception.
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  39. George Mandler (1984). Consciousness, Imagery, and Emotion -- With Special Reference to Autonomic Imagery. Journal of Mental Imagery 8:87-94.
  40. D. F. Marks (1990). On the Relationship Between Imagery, Body, and Mind. In P. J. Hampson, D. F. Marks & Janet Richardson (eds.), Imagery: Current Developments. Routledge.
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  41. D. F. Marks (1983). Imagery and Consciousness: A Theoretical Review. In Anees A. Sheikh (ed.), Imagery: Current Theory, Research, and Application. Wiley. 96--130.
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  42. D. F. Marks (1977). Imagery and Consciousness: A Theoretical Review From an Individual Differences Perspective. Journal of Mental Imagery 1:275-90.
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  43. A. Mavromatis (1987). On Shared States of Consciousness and Objective Imagery. Journal of Mental Imagery 11:125-30.
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  44. P. E. Morris & P. J. Hampson (1983). Imagery and Consciousness. Academic Press.
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  45. Bence Nanay (forthcoming). Perceptual Content and the Content of Mental Imagery. Philosophical Studies:1-14.
    The aim of this paper is to argue that the phenomenal similarity between perceiving and visualizing can be explained by the similarity between the structure of the content of these two different mental states. And this puts important constraints on how we should think about perceptual content and the content of mental imagery.
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  46. Natika Newton (1982). Experience and Imagery. Southern Journal of Philosophy 21 (4):475-87.
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  47. Kieron P. O'Connor & Frederick Aardema (2005). The Imagination: Cognitive, Pre-Cognitive, and Meta-Cognitive Aspects. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):233-256.
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  48. C. Palmerino & S. Roux (eds.) (forthcoming). Thought Experiments: Methodological and Historical Perspectives. Brill, Leiden.
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  49. T. Parent (forthcoming). Theory Dualism and the Metalogic of Mind-Body Problems. In Christopher Daly (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook to Philosophical Methods. Palgrave.
    The paper defends the philosophical method of "regimentation" by example, especially in relation to the theory of mind. The starting point is the Place-Smart after-image argument: A green after-image will not be located outside the skull, but if we cracked open your skull, we won't find anything green in there either. (If we did, you'd have some disturbing medical news.) So the after-image seems not to be in physical space, suggesting that it is non-physical. In response, I argue that the (...)
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  50. Alan W. Richardson (2000). Individual Differences in Visual Imagination Imagery. In Robert G. Kunzendorf & B. Alan Wallace (eds.), Individual Differences in Conscious Experience. John Benjamins.
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