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  1. Gordon C. Baylis, Christopher L. Gore, P. Dennis Rodriguez & Rebecca J. Shisler (2001). Visual Extinction and Awareness: The Importance of Binding Dorsal and Ventral Pathways. Visual Cognition. Special Issue 8 (3):359-379.
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  2. Bruce Bridgeman (2002). The Grand Illusion and Petit Illusions: Interactions of Perception and Sensory Coding. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (5-6):29-34.
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  3. Bruce Bridgeman (2000). Interactions Between Vision for Perception and Vision for Behavior. In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.
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  4. Bruce Bridgeman & V. Huemer (1998). A Spatially Oriented Decision Does Not Induce Consciousness in a Motor Task. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):454-464.
    Visual information follows at least two branches in the human nervous system, following a common input stage: a cognitive ''what'' branch governs perception and experience, while a sensorimotor ''how'' branch handles visually guided behavior though its outputs are unconscious. The sensorimotor system is probed with an isomorphic task, requiring a 1:1 relationship between target position and motor response. The cognitive system, in contrast, is probed with a forced qualitative decision, expressed verbally, about the location of a target. Normally, the cognitive (...)
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  5. Robert Briscoe (2009). Egocentric Spatial Representation in Action and Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (2):423 - 460.
    Neuropsychological findings used to motivate the "two visual systems" hypothesis have been taken to endanger a pair of widely accepted claims about spatial representation in conscious visual experience. The first is the claim that visual experience represents 3-D space around the perceiver using an egocentric frame of reference. The second is the claim that there is a constitutive link between the spatial contents of visual experience and the perceiver's bodily actions. In this paper, I review and assess three main sources (...)
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  6. Robert Briscoe (2008). Another Look at the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis: The Argument From Illusion Studies. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (8):35-62.
    The purpose of this paper is to defend what I call the action-oriented coding theory (ACT) of spatially contentful visual experience. Integral to ACT is the view that conscious visual experience and visually guided action make use of a common subject-relative or 'egocentric' frame of reference. Proponents of the influential two visual systems hypothesis (TVSH), however, have maintained on empirical grounds that this view is false (Milner & Goodale, 1995/2006; Clark, 1999; 2001; Campbell, 2002; Jacob & Jeannerod, 2003; Goodale & (...)
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  7. D. P. Carey, H. Chris Dijkerman & A. David Milner (1998). Perception and Action in Depth. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):438-453.
    Little is known about distance processing in patients with posterior brain damage. Although many investigators have claimed that distance estimates are normal or abnormal in some of these patients, many of these observations were made informally and the examiners often asked for relative, and not absolute, distance estimates. The present investigation served two purposes. First, we wanted to contrast the use of distance information in peripersonal space for perceptual report as opposed to visuomotor control in our visual form agnosic patient, (...)
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  8. Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.) (2001). Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press.
  9. Michel T. de Schotten, Marika Urbanski, Hugues Duffau, Emmanuelle Volle, Richard Lévy, Bruno Dubois & Paolo Bartolomeo (2005). Direct Evidence for a Parietal-Frontal Pathway Subserving Spatial Awareness in Humans. Science 309 (5744):2226-2228.
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  10. H. Chris Dijkerman, A. David Milner & D. P. Carey (1998). Grasping Spatial Relationships: Failure to Demonstrate Allocentric Visual Coding in a Patient with Visual Form Agnosia. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):424-437.
    The cortical visual mechanisms involved in processing spatial relationships remain subject to debate. According to one current view, the ''dorsal stream'' of visual areas, emanating from primary visual cortex and culminating in the posterior parietal cortex, mediates this aspect of visual processing. More recently, others have argued that while the dorsal stream provides egocentric coding of visual location for motor control, the separate ''ventral'' stream is needed for allocentric spatial coding. We have assessed the visual form agnosic patient DF, whose (...)
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  11. Jillian H. Fecteau, Romeo Chua, Ian Franks & James T. Enns (2001). Visual Awareness and the on-Line Modification of Action. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (2):104-110.
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  12. Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) (1995). The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press.
  13. Deborah Giaschi, James E. Jan, Bruce Bjornson, Simon Au Young, Matthew Tata, Christopher J. Lyons, William V. Good & Peter K. H. Wong (2003). Conscious Visual Abilities in a Patient with Early Bilateral Occipital Damage. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology 45 (11):772-781.
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  14. Daniel Gilman (1996). Optimization and Simplicity: Computational Vision and Biological Explanation. Synthese 107 (3):293 - 323.
    David Marr's theory of vision has been a rich source of inspiration, fascination and confusion. I will suggest that some of this confusion can be traced to discrepancies between the way Marr developed his theory in practice and the way he suggested such a theory ought to be developed in his explicit metatheoretical remarks. I will address claims that Marr's theory may be seen as an optimizing theory, along with the attendant suggestion that optimizing assumptions may be inappropriate for cognitive (...)
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  15. Melvyn A. Goodale (2007). Duplex Vision: Separate Cortical Pathways for Conscious Perception and the Control of Action. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. 616--627.
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  16. Melvyn A. Goodale (2004). Perceiving the World and Grasping It: Dissociations Between Conscious and Unconscious Visual Processing. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. Mit Press. 1159-1172.
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  17. Melvyn A. Goodale, Jonathan S. Cant & Grzegorz Króliczak (2006). Ögmen, Haluk; Breitmeyer, Bruno G. (2006). The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. (Pp. 51-71). Cambridge, MA, US: MIT Press. Xi, 410 Pp. [REVIEW]
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  18. Melvyn A. Goodale, Jonathan S. Cant & Grzegorz Króliczak (2006). Grasping the Past and Present: When Does Visuomotor Priming Occur? In Ögmen, Haluk; Breitmeyer, Bruno G. (2006). The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. (Pp. 51-71). Cambridge, Ma, Us: Mit Press. Xi, 410 Pp.
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  19. Melvyn A. Goodale & A. David Milner (2004/2005). Sight Unseen: An Exploration of Conscious and Unconscious Vision. Oxford University Press.
    Vision, more than any other sense, dominates our mental life. Our visual experience is just so rich, so detailed, that we can hardly distinguish that experience from the world itself. Even when we just think about the world and don't look at it directly, we can't help but 'imagine' what it looks like. We think of 'seeing' as being a conscious activity--we direct our eyes, we choose what we look at, we register what we are seeing. The series of events (...)
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  20. Melvyn A. Goodale & A. David Milner (1992). Separate Visual Pathways for Perception and Action. Trends in Neurosciences 15:20-25.
  21. Melvyn A. Goodale & K. Murphy (2000). Space in the Brain: Different Neural Substrates for Allocentric and Egocentric Frames of Reference. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press.
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  22. G. K. Humphrey & Melvyn A. Goodale (1998). Probing Unconscious Visual Processing with the Mccollough Effect. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):494-519.
    The McCollough effect, an orientation-contingent color aftereffect, has been known for over 30 years and, like other aftereffects, has been taken as a means of probing the brain's operations psychophysically. In this paper, we review psychophysical, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging studies of the McCollough effect. Much of the evidence suggests that the McCollough effect depends on neural mechanisms that are located early in the cortical visual pathways, probably in V1. We also review evidence showing that the aftereffect can be induced without (...)
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  23. Glyn W. Humphreys, Tom Troscianko, M. J. Riddoch & M. Boucart (1992). Covert Processing in Different Visual Recognition Systems. In A. David Milner & M. D. Rugg (eds.), The Neuropsychology of Consciousness. Academic Press.
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  24. Hans-Otto Karnath, David Milner & Giuseppe Vallar (eds.) (2002). The Cognitive and Neural Bases of Spatial Neglect. Oxford University Press.
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  25. Michael Madary (2011). The Dorsal Stream and the Visual Horizon. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):423-438.
    Today many philosophers of mind accept that the two cortical streams of visual processing in humans can be distinguished in terms of conscious experience. The ventral stream is thought to produce representations that may become conscious, and the dorsal stream is thought to handle unconscious vision for action. Despite a vast literature on the topic of the two streams, there is currently no account of the way in which the relevant empirical evidence could fit with basic Husserlian phenomenology of vision. (...)
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  26. Eric Mandelbaum, Ballistic, Automatic, Mandatory: On An Ambiguity in Mandatory Perceptual Processing.
  27. Thomas Metzinger (2000). Neural Correlates of Consciousness: Empirical and Conceptual Questions. MIT Press.
  28. A. David Milner (1998). Streams and Consciousness: Visual Awareness and the Brain. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (1):25-30.
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  29. A. David Milner & H. Chris Dijkerman (2001). Direct and Indirect Visuals Routes to Action. In Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.), Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press. 241-264.
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  30. A. David Milner & Melvyn A. Goodale (1995). The Visual Brain in Action. Oxford University Press.
    Although the mechanics of how the eye works are well understood, debate still exists as to how the complex machinery of the brain interprets neural impulses...
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  31. A. David Milner & M. D. Rugg (eds.) (1991). The Neuropsychology of Consciousness. Academic Press.
  32. David Milner & Melvyn A. Goodale (1998). The Visual Brain in Action (Precis). Psyche 4 (12).
    First published in 1995, The Visual Brain in Action remains a seminal publication in the cognitive sciences. It presents a model for understanding the visual processing underlying perception and action, proposing a broad distinction within the brain between two kinds of vision: conscious perception and unconscious 'online' vision. It argues that each kind of vision can occur quasi-independently of the other, and is separately handled by a quite different processing system. In the 11 years since publication, the book has provoked (...)
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  33. Bence Nanay (2011). Perceiving Pictures. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):461-480.
    I aim to give a new account of picture perception: of the way our visual system functions when we see something in a picture. My argument relies on the functional distinction between the ventral and dorsal visual subsystems. I propose that it is constitutive of picture perception that our ventral subsystem attributes properties to the depicted scene, whereas our dorsal subsystem attributes properties to the picture surface. This duality elucidates Richard Wollheim’s concept of the “twofoldness” of our experience of pictures: (...)
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  34. Morten Overgaard, Jorgen Feldbaek Nielsen & Anders Fuglsang-Frederiksen (2004). A TMS Study of the Ventral Projections From V1 with Implications for the Finding of Neural Correlates of Consciousness. Brain and Cognition 54 (1):58-64.
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  35. Ernst Poppel, R. Held & D. Frost (1973). Residual Function After Brain Wounds Involving the Central Visual Pathways in Man. Nature 243:295-96.
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  36. Yves Rossetti (ed.) (2000). Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. Amsterdam: J Benjamins.
  37. Luiz Carlos L. Silveira (2004). Parallel Visual Pathways From the Retina to the Visual Cortex – How Do They Fit? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):50-51.
    Which roles are played by subcortical pathways in models of cortical streams for visual processing? Through their thalamic relays, magnocellular (M) and parvocellular (P) projecting ganglion cells send complementary signals to V1, where their outputs are combined in several different ways. The synergic role of M and P cells in vision can be understood by estimating cell response entropy in all domains of interest.
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  38. Peter Thier, Thomas Haarmeier, Subhojit Chakraborty, Axel Lindner & Alexander Tikhonov (2002). Cortical Substrates of Visuospatial Awareness Outside the Classical Dorsal Stream of Visual Processing. In Hans-Otto Karnath, David Milner & Giuseppe Vallar (eds.), The Cognitive and Neural Bases of Spatial Neglect. Oxford University Press. 71-81.
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  39. Nigel J. T. Thomas, New Support for the Perceptual Activity Theory of Mental Imagery.
    Since the publication of my "Are Theories of Imagery Theories of Imagination? An _Active Perception_ Approach to Conscious Mental Content," (Thomas, 1999 - henceforth abbreviated as ATOITOI on this page), a good deal of published material has appeared or has come to my attention that either provides additional support for the Perceptual Activity Theory PA theory) of mental imagery presented in ATOITOI, or that throws further doubt on the rival (picture and description) theories that are criticized there. Other relevant evidence (...)
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  40. Wayne Wu (forthcoming). Against Division: Consciousness, Information and the Visual Streams. Mind and Language.
    Milner and Goodale’s influential account of the primate cortical visual streams involves a division of consciousness between them, for it is the ventral stream that has the responsibility for visual consciousness. Hence, the dorsal visual stream is a “zombie” stream. In this paper, I argue that certain information carried by the dorsal stream likely plays a central role in the egocentric spatial content of experience, especially the experience of visual spatial constancy. Thus, the dorsal stream contributes to a pervasive feature (...)
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  41. Wayne Wu (2013). The Case for Zombie Agency. Mind 122 (485):217-230.
    In response to Mole 2009, I present an argument for zombie action. The crucial question is not whether but rather to what extent we are zombie agents. I argue that current evidence supports only minimal zombie agency.
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  42. Wayne Wu (2008). Visual Attention, Conceptual Content, and Doing It Right. Mind 117 (468):1003-1033.
    Reflection on the fine-grained information required for visual guidance of action has suggested that visual content is non-conceptual. I argue that in a common type of visually guided action, namely the use of manipulable artefacts, vision has conceptual content. Specifically, I show that these actions require visual attention and that concepts are involved in directing attention. In acting with artefacts, there is a way of doing it right as determined by the artefact’s conventional use. Attention must reflect our understanding of (...)
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