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Subcategories:History/traditions: War
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  1. Arash Abizadeh (2011). Hobbes on the Causes of War: A Disagreement Theory. American Political Science Review 105 (02):298-315.
    Hobbesian war primarily arises not because material resources are scarce; or because humans ruthlessly seek survival before all else; or because we are naturally selfish, competitive, or aggressive brutes. Rather, it arises because we are fragile, fearful, impressionable, and psychologically prickly creatures susceptible to ideological manipulation, whose anger can become irrationally inflamed by even trivial slights to our glory. The primary source of war, according to Hobbes, is disagreement, because we read into it the most inflammatory signs of contempt. Both (...)
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  2. Richard Adams & Chris Barrie (2013). The Bureaucratization of War: Moral Challenges Exemplified by the Covert Lethal Drone. Ethics and Global Politics 6 (4).
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  3. Hannah Arendt & Hans Jürgen Benedict (2009). Revolution, Violence, and Power: A Correspondence. Constellations 16 (2):302-306.
  4. Mark Ayyash (2007). The Appearance of War in Discourse: The Neoconservatives on Iraq. Constellations 14 (4):613-634.
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  5. Alain Badiou (2013). Philosophy for Militants. Verso.
    Enigmatic relationship between philosophy and politics -- Figure of the soldier -- Politics as a nonexpressive dialectics.
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  6. Gary J. Bass (2004). Jus Post Bellum. Philosophy and Public Affairs 32 (4):384–412.
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  7. Saba Bazargan (2012). The Permissibility of Aiding and Abetting Unjust Wars. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):513-529.
    Common sense suggests that if a war is unjust, then there is a strong moral reason not to contribute to it. I argue that this presumption is mistaken. It can be permissible to contribute to an unjust war because, in general, whether it is permissible to perform an act often depends on the alternatives available to the actor. The relevant alternatives available to a government waging a war differ systematically from the relevant alternatives available to individuals in a position to (...)
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  8. S. R. Benatar (1993). Medical Ethics in Times of War and Insurrection: Rights and Duties. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 14 (3):137-147.
    The military might of the modern era poses devastating threats to humankind. Wars result from struggles for material or ideological power. In this context the probability of flouting agreements made during peaceful times is great. The rights of victims and the rights of medical personnel are vulnerable to State and military momentum in the quest for sovereignty. Scholars, scientists and physicians enjoy little enough influence during times of peace and we should be sanguine about their influence during war. But we (...)
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  9. Seyla Benhabib (2002). Unholy Wars. Constellations 9 (1):34-45.
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  10. B. Berger (2010). Fear Itself: Civic War and the Corruption of the Citizen, by Peter Alexander Meyers. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008. 376 Pp. $29.00 (Hardcover). Governing Through Crime: How the War on Crime Transformed American Democracy and Created a Culture of Fear, by Jonathan Simon. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. 330 Pp. $29.99 (Hardcover). [REVIEW] Political Theory 38 (2):291-299.
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  11. Mauricio Berger, Cecilia Carrizo & Pastor Montoya (2006). Nuevas Geografías de la Hostilidad y Nuevas Modalidades de Composición de la Hospitalidad En Los Procedimientos Militantes Contemporáneos. In Carlos Balzi & César Marchesino (eds.), Hostilidad/Hospitalidad. Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Area de Filosofía Del Centro de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Filosofía y Humanidades.
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  12. Joseph Betz (2005). Proportionality, Just War Theory, and America's 2003–2004 War Against Iraq. Social Philosophy Today 21:137-156.
    Just war theory requires that a nation at war respect proportionality both before it goes to war, jus ad bellum, and in the way it fights a war, jus in bello. To respect proportionality is to know or estimate on good evidence that the whole war and the tactics used in the war will not generate more evil and harm and costs than they will generate good and help and benefits. This paper argues that the 2003–2004 U.S. war on Iraq (...)
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  13. Camillo Bica (2007). Opposing a War and/or Supporting the Warrior: The Moral Obligations of Citizens in an Immoral War. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (4):627–643.
  14. Rebecca Ard Boone (2007). War, Domination, and the Monarchy of France: Claude de Seyssel and the Language of Politics in the Renaissance. Brill.
    In medias res: the life of Claude de Seyssel -- The scholar diplomat -- The translator of histories -- Seyssel in Italy : a scholar looks at war -- The scholar and the state -- Seyssel, the church, and the ideal prelate.
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  15. Helga Botermann (1974). The Role of the Army in the Period From Marius to Caesar. Military and Political Problems of a Professional Army. Philosophy and History 7 (1):66-67.
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  16. R. B. Brandt (1972). Utilitarianism and the Rules of War. Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (2):145-165.
    The JSTOR Archive is a trusted digital repository providing for long-term preservation and access to leading academic journals and scholarly literature from around the world. The Archive is supported by libraries, scholarly societies, publishers, and foundations. It is an initiative of JSTOR, a not-for-profit organization with a mission to help the scholarly community take advantage of advances in technology. For more information regarding JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.
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  17. Jonathan E. Brockopp (ed.) (2003). Islamic Ethics of Life: Abortion, War, and Euthanasia. University of South Carolina Press.
    o ne -taking -Life ana Oavmg .Life The Islamic Context Jonathan E. Brockopp The great ethicists of the western world, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, and others, ...
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  18. Chris Brown (2011). Justifying the Obligation to Die: War, Ethics and Political Obligation with Illustrations From Zionism, Ilan Zvi Baron. Contemporary Political Theory 10 (4):506.
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  19. William Bruening (1981). World Peace and Moral Obligation. Journal of Social Philosophy 12 (2):11-19.
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  20. Anthony Burden (2009). An Analysis of Why Stalin is to Blame for the German Invasion. Constellations 1 (1).
    The German invasion of the Soviet Union in June of 1941 has long been attributed to errors by Joseph Stalin, yet a revisionist position known as the Icebreaker hypothesis has also emerged alleging that Stalin is not to blame. This essay examines why the Icebreaker theory is erroneous based on its lack of concrete facts. The reasons why Operation Barbarossa was so effective are also examined, leading to the conclusion that Stalin should still shoulder most of the blame for Soviet (...)
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  21. Harry B. Burke (2009). War is Persuasion. Critical Review 21 (1):1-3.
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  22. T. Chappell (1995). Richard Norman. Ethics, Killing and War. Journal of Applied Philosophy 12:300-300.
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  23. Raphael Cohen-Almagor, The Israel-Hezbollah War and the Winograd Committee.
    On July 12, 2006, the Hezbollah terrorist organization attacked two Israeli Defense Forces' armored Hummer jeeps patrolling along the border with gunfire and explosives, in the midst of massive shelling attacks on Israel's north. Three soldiers were killed in the attack and two were taken hostage. The Israeli Defence Forces (IDF) began heavy artillery and tank fire. Prime Minister Ehud Olmert convened the government on Wednesday night, June 12, 2006 to decide Israel's reaction. The government agreed that the attack had (...)
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  24. Iuliana Conovici (2013). Re-Weaving Memory: Representations of the Interwar and Communist Periods in the Romanian Orthodox Church After 1989. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 12 (35):109-131.
    After the fall of Communism, the Romanian Orthodox Church was forced to face its recent past, scarred by its collaboration – harshly criticized in the early 1990s – with the Ceauşescu regime. The Church’s turn to its memory of the interwar period in order to legitimize the (re)casting of Orthodoxy as a public religion was also problematic. Based mainly, but not solely on the analysis of public discourses originating with the Orthodox Church hierarchy and clergy, this paper will address the (...)
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  25. W. A. Coupe (1962). Political and Religious Cartoons of the Thirty Years' War. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 25 (1/2):65-86.
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  26. Emily Crookston (2005). Strict Just War Theory and Conditional Pacifism. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 79:73-84.
    With regard to the morality of war, political philosophers have defended one of two basic positions, just war theory or absolute pacifism, but between thesetwo opposing views are various moderate positions. Throughout its long history, the Catholic Church has taken various stances, some strong and others more moderate, on the question of war. Unfortunately, the most recent formulation of the Church’s position is a moderate position without clear guidelines. In this paper I argue that if one wishes to maintain that (...)
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  27. Fred Dallmayr (2001). Memory and Social Imagination: Latin American Reflections. Critical Horizons 2 (2):153-171.
    The imagination opens onto a reconciliation of the past with the future, especially when it is activated as a retrieval of the memories of collective suffering. This is especially the case with the Latin American experience, with its history of military governments and their 'dirty wars' against their civilians. Using Ricoeur's notion of the metaphorical imagination, and drawing on Dussel's work on ethical hermeneutics, this paper argues that, in the act of remembering, other social imaginaries can be created as possibilities (...)
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  28. Michael Davis (2012). Torture, Terror, and War: Justifying Exceptions to Ordinary Moral Decency. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (3):264-267.
  29. Tyler Dawson (2010). 'The Whole World is Watching!' The 1968 Chicago Riots. Constellations 1 (2).
    In 1968, the Democratic Party of the United States held its convention in Chicago. Thousands of anti-war protestors arrived to picket the democratic process and voice their concerns over the Vietnam War for the upcoming presidential election. With prior knowledge of the coming protests, the Chicago Police Department and city administration expected violence and prepared themselves accordingly. As a result, the convention was plagued all week by violence in the streets as protestors clashed with the police. At the end, the (...)
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  30. F. M. Dolan (2006). Book Review: Manhood and American Political Culture in the Cold War. [REVIEW] Political Theory 34 (6):821-824.
  31. Daniel A. Dombrowski (2002). Rawls and War. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):185-200.
    The purpose of the present article is to explicate John Rawls’s views on war as they are scattered across several of his writings. Three claims are made: (1) Rawls is generally a just war theorist who usually argues against the “realist” view of war; (2) Under the influence of Michael Walzer, however, Rawls ends up making an illadvised concession to the realist view concerning conditions of “supreme emergency”; and (3), despite Rawls’s blend of just war theory/realism, the logic of his (...)
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  32. Daniel A. Dombrowski (1983). What Does “War Is Hell” Mean? International Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (4):19-23.
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  33. Christopher J. Eberle & Rick Rubel (2012). Religious Conviction in the Profession of Arms. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (3):171-185.
    Abstract Many political theorists have argued that religious reasons should play a rather limited role in public or political settings. So, for example, according to the Doctrine of Religious Restraint, citizens and legislators ought not allow religious reasons to play a decisive role in justifying public policies. Many military professionals seem to believe that some version of that doctrine applies in military settings, that is, that military professionals should not allow their religious convictions to determine how they exercise command authority. (...)
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  34. Nir Eisikovits (2012). Stephen Nathanson, Terrorism and the Ethics of War. Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (4):603-606.
    What is a disability? What sorts of limitations do persons with disabilities or impairments experience? What is there about having a disability or impairment that makes it disadvantageous for the individuals with it? Are persons with severe cognitive impairments capable of making autonomous decisions? What role should disability play in the construction of theories of justice? Is it ever ethical for parents to seek to create a child with an impairment? This anthology addresses these and other questions and is a (...)
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  35. Ovadia Ezra (2007). Moral Obligations and Immoral Wars: A Comment on Bica. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (4):644–653.
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  36. Joseph Conrad Fehr (1942). Democratic Leadership in Peace and War. Thought 17 (1):37-48.
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  37. Maria João Ferreira & Pedro F. Marcelino (2011). Politics in Trauma Times: Of Subjectivity, War, and Humanitarian Intervention. Ethics and Global Politics 4 (2).
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  38. Rory Fidler (2011). LBJ, LBJ, How Many Kids Did You Ignore Today? Constellations 2 (2):133-143.
    The actual effectiveness of the American anti-war movement from 1964-68 and its attempts to sway the policy of President Johnson's administration on the topic of the Vietnam War is debatable. While popular myth has exaggerated the role of protestors in stopping the war, the movement failed to alter state policy on the war in any serious fashion. The anti-war movement could not develop a universal policy of their aims, differing from a gradual exit from Vietnam to a complete anarchist overthrow (...)
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  39. Luca Follis (2007). Laboratory of War: Abu Ghraib, the Human Intelligence Network and the Global War on Terror. Constellations 14 (4):635-660.
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  40. Erin Gallagher-Cohoon (2013). “Illegal Loves and Sexual Deviancy: Homosexuality as a Threat in Cold War Canada”. Constellations 4 (2).
    This paper analyzes the criminalization and medicalization of homosexuality during the early twentieth century in Canada. Through court records and medical texts the discourse of homosexuality as a threat to the family unit and to the nation is contextualized within Cold War rhetoric. A Foucaultian conceptualization of power and discipline helps frame questions regarding homosexuality as a criminal offense and as a mental illness. It is argued that both state control and societal pressures constructed the homosexual as criminal, the homosexual (...)
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  41. William Gay, Nuclear Warfare and Morality.
    In each decade of the nuclear age, philosophers have provided critical reflections on the nature, use, and consequences of nuclear weapons. Frequently, these reflections have addressed the morality of producing, testing, deploying, and using nuclear weapons. Already, these philosophical reflections have passed through four phases and are now entering a fifth phase. The first phase stretches from the atomic bombing of Hiroshima to the above ground nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll. From the initial use of atomic weapons in 1945 to (...)
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  42. Alan Gilbert (1978). Marx on Internationalism and War. Philosophy and Public Affairs 7 (4):346-369.
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  43. Robert Ginsberg (1972). Philosophical Activity and War. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 33 (2):174-185.
    What should philosophers do about war? That question has been answered in various ways throughout the history of philosophy, and it appears to still trouble members of this distinguished profession in these times. A reason for the current uneasiness is that while philosophy in our century has largely neglected the problem of the world, it is apparent that there will soon be no world for philosophers to neglect unless an antidote for war is found. Since psychologists, statesmen, religious leaders, and (...)
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  44. John Gould (2003). Tocqueville Beyond the Post-Cold War. European Journal of Political Theory 2 (4):429-441.
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  45. Jörg Hackmann (2009). From National Victims to Transnational Bystanders? The Changing Commemoration of World War II in Central and Eastern Europe. Constellations 16 (1):167-181.
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  46. Sarah Helman (1999). War and Resistance: Israeli Civil Militarism and its Emergent Crisis. Constellations 6 (3):391-410.
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  47. Adam Henschke & Nicholas G. Evans (2012). Winning Well by Fighting Well. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):149-163.
    Modern warfare has shifted from the traditional conception of states involved in self-defensive wars to include peacekeeping missions, humanitarian intervention, regional stabilisation in the face of natural disasters, and more. A central criterion from just war traditions is the probability of success—given the magnitude of harms that large military operations are expected to cause; there must be some likelihood that the military operation will be successful. However, how likely a given military operation will be is dependent, in part at least, (...)
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  48. Noor Iqbal (2010). Enacting Remembrance Day in the Public Sphere. Constellations 2 (1).
    The form of commemoration offered by Remembrance Day ceremonies works to produce a sense of nationalist patriotism. The ‘public history’ of the nation, as a mode of self-representation, presents a particular narrative of limited scope, occluding all elements that do not fit its ideological framework. Remembrance Day simultaneously invokes and educates Canadian collective memory and public history, mediated through the contemporary power/knowledge discourse on war. The values, structure, and 'tendencies of a society' become evident in collective memory and this cultural (...)
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  49. William James (1971). The Moral Equivalent of War, and Other Essays. New York,Harper & Row.
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  50. Howard P. Kainz (1988). Strategic Surrender: Overcoming the Paradoxes. Journal of Social Philosophy 19 (1):14-25.
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