About this topic
Summary

The predominant area in the philosophy of war and violence is just war theory, which examines when the resort to war is justified (jus ad bellum) and the ethical constraints on the conduct of war (jus in bello). The just war tradition encompasses writings from many different philosophical and religious traditions and spans several hundred years of debate. In the last one hundred years, philosophical debates on war and violence have expanded to include discussions about pacifism, the definition and justification of terrorism and counterterrorism, the ethics of nuclear deterrence, and the ethics of torture. 

Key works Key historical writers on just war theory include Grotius unknown, Vitoria, and Carl von Clausewitz. Contemporary just war theory really began with the publication of Michael Walzer's Just and Unjust Wars (first edition 1977). Other key works include Richard Wasserstrom 1970, Coady 1985Rodin 2007, and Primoratz 2004
Introductions Nagel 1972 Luban 1980 Narveson 1965 Anscombe ms Hare 1972
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Related categories
Subcategories:
Violence (1,353 | 134)
Genocide (140)
Murder (105)
Rape (87)
Terrorism (521)
Torture (252)

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  1. Carlo Salzani (2008). Violence as Pure Praxis: Benjamin and Sorel on Strike, Myth and Ethics. Colloquy 16:18-48.
    Though for the Western political tradition violence is usually deemed merely instrumental, and thus neither essential to, nor constitutive of, the bios politikos, Walter Benjamin’s “Zur Kritik der Gewalt” [“Critique of Violence,” 1921] and Georges Sorel’s RØflexions sur la violence [Reflections on Violence, 1908] constitute an exception. 1 In very different ways, both texts put forward a notion of violence which comes to coincide with pure praxis, that is, with pure political action, in great contrast with a political tradition which (...)
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  2. Ronald E. Santoni (1985). Just War and Nuclear Reality. Philosophy Today 29 (3-4):175-190.
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  3. Tomohito Shinoda (2013). DPJ's Political Leadership in Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident. Japanese Journal of Political Science 14 (2):243-259.
    The 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami damaged the nuclear reactors in Fukushima. Prime Minister Naoto Kan took this crisis seriously, and made himself personally involved with damage control, especially during the first week. This study examines the responses to the incident by the prime minister's office.
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  4. Henry Shue & David Rodin (eds.) (2009). Preemption: Military Action and Moral Justification. Oup Oxford.
    Is a nation ever justified in attacking before it has been attacked? If so, under precisely what conditions? This volume of new, specially commissioned chapters provides the most definitive assessment to date of the justifiability of preemptive or preventive military action.
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  5. Lenart Skof (2012). On Democratic Experimentalism: Toward a Culture of Love and Non-Violence. Contemporary Pragmatism 9 (2):287-299.
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  6. Ivana Spasic & Tamara Petrovic (2012). Variants of „Third Serbia“. Filozofija I Društvo 23 (3):23-44.
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  7. Ab Toit (1990). Discourses on Political Violence: The Problem of Coherence. South African Journal of Philosophy 9 (4):191-213.
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  8. Anton van Harskamp (2013). Lorenzo Magnani: Understanding Violence, The Intertwining of Morality, Religion and Violence: A Philosophical Stance. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (5):1089-1092.
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  9. Manuel G. Velasquez (forthcoming). Toy Wars. Business Ethics: Concepts and Cases.
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  10. Josef Velek (2013). The Statesman in the Role of Tragic Hero? Just War and the Supreme Emergency. Filosoficky Casopis 61 (4):497-523.
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  11. James R. Vogt (1969). Radionuclide Production for the Nuclear Excavation of an Isthmian Canal. BioScience 19 (2):138-139.
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  12. Lindsey Wade (2003). Terrorism and the Internet: Resistance in the Information Age. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 16 (1):104-127.
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  13. Michael Walzer (1986). Supreme Emergency. In Malham M. Wakin (ed.), War, Morality, and the Military Profession. Westview Press. 440.
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  14. Michael Weber (2005). Are Terrorists Cowards? Public Affairs Quarterly 19 (4):331-342.
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  15. E. Weizman (2010). Legislative Attack. Theory, Culture and Society 27 (6):11-32.
    Israel’s 22-day attack on Gaza in December 2008—January 2009 exposed a paradox: the attack was not only one of the most violent and destructive of Israel’s recent wars on the Palestinians and the one most strongly opposed by its critics, but also the one in which Israeli experts in international humanitarian law — the area of the law that regulates the conduct of war — were most closely involved. The article demonstrates how these facts are connected.
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  16. Hugh White (2010). Civilian Immunity in the Precision-Guidance Age. In Igor Primoratz (ed.), Civilian Immunity in War. Oup Oxford.
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  17. Barry Wilkins (1978). Three Essays on Political Violence. Philosophical Books 19 (1):31-33.
  18. Iris Marion Young (2003). Violence Against Power: Critical Thoughts on Military Intervention. In Dean Chatterjee & Donald Scheid (eds.), Ethics and Foreign Intervention. Cambridge University Press.
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Violence
  1. Hanan Alexander (2014). Education in Nonviolence: Levinas' Talmudic Readings and the Study of Sacred Texts. Ethics and Education 9 (1):58-68.
  2. Larry Alexander (1993). Self-Defense, Justification and Excuse. Philosophy and Public Affairs 22 (1):53-66.
  3. Andrew Alexandra (2012). Private Military and Security Companies and the Liberal Conception of Violence. Criminal Justice Ethics 31 (3):158-174.
    Abstract The institution of war is the broad framework of rules, norms, and organizations dedicated to the prevention, prosecution, and resolution of violent conflict between political entities. Important parts of that institution consist of the accountability arrangements that hold between armed forces, the political leaders who oversee and direct the use of those forces, and the people in whose name the leaders act and from whose ranks the members of the armed forces are drawn. Like other parts of the institution, (...)
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  4. Anatole Anton (1990). The Caveman and the Bomb. Social Philosophy Today 3:425-426.
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  5. Hannah Arendt & Hans Jürgen Benedict (2009). Revolution, Violence, and Power: A Correspondence. Constellations 16 (2):302-306.
  6. R. Argullol (2007). What is Left of the Angel? Diogenes 54 (3):77-79.
    The author raises the problem of the presence of terror in contemporary life. He analyzes the continuous dynamic between fear, terror and hopes of peace in contemporary societies. Dignity appears as a blueprint of the ubiquitous presence of terror and fear.
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  7. Samantha Ashenden (2014). On Violence in Habermas's Philosophy of Language. European Journal of Political Theory 13 (4):427-452.
    Habermas does not rule out the possibility of violence in language. In fact his account explicitly licenses a broad conception of violence as ‘systematically distorted communication’. Yet he does rule out the possibility that language simultaneously imposes as it discloses. That is, his argument precludes the possibility of recognizing that there is an antinomy at the heart of language and philosophical reason. This occlusion of the simultaneously world-disclosing and world-imposing character of language feeds and sustains Habermas’s legal and political arguments, (...)
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  8. Alain Badiou (2013). Philosophy for Militants. Verso.
    Enigmatic relationship between philosophy and politics -- Figure of the soldier -- Politics as a nonexpressive dialectics.
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  9. Etienne Balibar (2001). Outlines of a Topography of Cruelty: Citizenship and Civility in the Era of Global Violence. Constellations 8 (1):15-29.
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  10. László Levente Balogh (2011). Az Erőszak Kritikája: Tanulmányok. Debreceni Egyetemi Kiadó.
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  11. Tarak Barkawi (2002). Organising Violence in World Politics: A Review Essay. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 5 (1):101-120.
  12. William J. Behre, Ron Avi Astor & Heather Ann Meyer (2001). Elementary- and Middle-School Teachers' Reasoning About Intervening in School Violence: An Examination of Violence-Prone School Subcontexts. Journal of Moral Education 30 (2):131-153.
    The study compared middle-school and elementary-school teachers' (N = 108) reasoning about their professional roles when violence occurred in "undefined" and potentially violence-prone school subcontexts (e.g. hallways, cafeterias, playgrounds). The study combined concepts from urban planing, architecture, criminology and cognitive developmental domain theory to explore teachers' moral attributions towards school spaces. Participants were asked to locate dangerous locations and discuss their professional roles in those locations. Teachers were also given hypothetical situations where the specific subcontexts (i.e. hallways, classroom, school yard) (...)
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  13. Robert Bernasconi (2011). Perpetual Peace and the Invention of Total War. In Nathan Eckstrand & Christopher S. Yates (eds.), Philosophy and the Return of Violence: Studies From This Widening Gyre. Continuum International Publishing Group.
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  14. Joseph R. Biden (1998). Commentary: Attacking Youth Violence. Criminal Justice Ethics 17 (1):2-67.
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  15. Peg Birmingham (2011). Agamben on Violence, Language, and Human Rights. In Nathan Eckstrand & Christopher S. Yates (eds.), Philosophy and the Return of Violence: Studies From This Widening Gyre. Continuum International Publishing Group.
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  16. Martin Blanchard (2012). Violence et démocratie délibérative : introduction. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 7 (1):45-49.
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  17. Jeffrey Bloechl (2011). Towards an Anthropology of Violence: Existential Analyses of Levinas, Girard, Freud. In Nathan Eckstrand & Christopher S. Yates (eds.), Philosophy and the Return of Violence: Studies From This Widening Gyre. Continuum International Publishing Group.
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  18. Geoff Boucher (2010). Slavoj Žižek, Violence. [REVIEW] Critical Horizons 10 (3):425-430.
  19. Richard Bourne, Eli H. Newberger & C. Sue White (forthcoming). Mandated Child Abuse Reporting. Ethics and Behavior.
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  20. Cristian Bratu (2011). Political Violence and/as Evil : Sartre's Dirty Hands. In Scott M. Powers (ed.), Evil in Contemporary French and Francophone Literature. Cambridge Scholars Pub..
  21. Torkel Brekke (2004). Wielding the Rod of Punishment – War and Violence in the Political Science of Kautilya. Journal of Military Ethics 3 (1):40-52.
    This article presents Kautilya, the most important thinker in the tradition of statecraft in India. Kautilya has influenced ideas of war and violence in much of South- and Southeast Asia and he is of great importance for a comparative understanding of the ethics of war. The violence inflicted by the king on internal and external enemies is pivotal for the maintenance of an ordered society, according to Kautilya. Prudence and treason are hallmarks of Kautilya's world. The article shows that this (...)
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  22. Bruce Buchan (2001). Liberalism and Fear of Violence. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (3):27-48.
    Liberal political thought is underwritten by an enduring fear of civil and state violence. It is assumed within liberal thought that self?interest characterises relations between individuals in civil society, resulting in violence. In absolutist doctrines, such as Hobbes?, the pacification of private persons depended on the Sovereign's command of a monopoly of violence. Liberals, by contrast, sought to claim that the state itself must be pacified, its capacity for cruelty (e.g., torture) removed, its capacity for violence (e.g., war) reduced and (...)
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  23. Richard M. Buck (2004). Beyond Retribution. Social Philosophy Today 20:67-80.
    The very nature of terrorism and the context in which it typically occurs make responding to it much more complicated, morally speaking, than responding to conventional military attacks. Two points are particularly important here: (1) terrorism often arises in the midst of conflicts that can only be resolved at the negotiating table; (2) responses to terrorist acts almost always present significant risks to the lives and well-being of noncombatants. The history of the Israel-Palestinian conflict suggests that its resolution will only (...)
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  24. C. C. (1975). Reason and Violence. Review of Metaphysics 29 (1):152-153.
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  25. Delwin D. Cahoon & Ed M. Edmonds (1984). Guns/No Guns and the Expression of Social Hostility. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (4):305-308.
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  26. Nicole Gastineau Campos & Paul Farmer (2003). Partners: Discernment and Humanitarian Efforts in Settings of Violence. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):506-515.
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  27. Terrell Carver (2010). Sex, Violence and Crime: Foucault and the |[Lsquo]|Man|[Rsquo]| Question. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (3):347.
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  28. Noam Chomsky, Commentary: Moral Truisms, Empirical Evidence, and Foreign Policy.
    Many studies of world politics fail to take evidence seriously or consider basic moral truisms (for example, that the standards we apply to others we must apply to ourselves). This commentary illustrates these assessments in relation to two subjects which have attracted much interest in the West recently – terrorism and just war to combat terrorism. The evidence shows that the United States has engaged extensively in terrorism and that application of just war principles would entitle the victims of that (...)
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  29. Noam Chomsky & Tim Dunne, Who Are the Global Terrorists?
    The condemnations of terrorism are sound, but leave some questions unanswered. The first is: What do we mean by "terrorism"? Second: What is the proper response to the crime? Whatever the answer, it must at least satisfy a moral truism: If we propose some principle that is to be applied to antagonists, then we must agree -- in fact, strenuously insist -- that the principle apply to us as well. Those who do not rise even to this minimal level of (...)
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  30. Jacek Chrobaczyński & Wojciech Wrzesiński (eds.) (2004). Dramat Przemocy W Historycznej Perspektywie. Wydawnictwo Wam.
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  31. C. A. J. Coady (1985). The Idea of Violence. Philosophical Papers 14 (1):3-19.
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  32. Clare Connors (2010). Force From Nietzsche to Derrida. Legenda, Modern Humanities Research Association and Maney Publishing.
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1 — 50 / 2893