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  1. Richard Adams (2013). Moral Autonomy in Australian Legislation and Military Doctrine. Ethics and Global Politics 6 (3).
    "Australian legislation and military doctrine stipulate that soldiers ‘subjugate their will’ to" "government, and fight in any war the government declares. Neither legislation nor doctrine enables the conscience of soldiers. Together, provisions of legislation and doctrine seem to take soldiers for granted. And, rather than strengthening the military instrument, the convention of legislation and doctrine seems to weaken the democratic foundations upon which the military may be shaped as a force for justice. Denied liberty of their conscience, soldiers are denied (...)
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  2. Maurice Apprey & Endel Talvik (2006). On the Sense of Ownership of a Community Integration Project: Phenomenology as Praxis in the Transfer of Project Ownership From Third-Party Facilitators to a Community After Conflict Resolution. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 6 (2).
    There are non-governmental organizations that operate transnationally and there are those that operate within the boundaries of a nation. A third use of non-governmental organizations is articulated. We may call this third category an instrumental use of non-governmental organizations to facilitate the transfer of the work of third-party conflict resolution practitioners to the two previously feuding parties. Representative accounts are provided in Part I of this paper. In Part II, the instrumental use of the NGO to transfer knowledge from practitioners (...)
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  3. Banu Bargu (2009). The Weaponization of Life. Constellations 16 (4):634-643.
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  4. Mary Ann Barton (1992). Japanese American Relocation: Who is Responsible? Journal of Social Philosophy 23 (2):142-157.
  5. Torkel Brekke (ed.) (2006). The Ethics of War in Asian Civilizations: A Comparative Perspective. Routledge.
    This study of the comparative ethics of war seeks to open a discussion about whether there are universal standards in the ideologies of warfare between the major religious traditions of the world. The project looks at the ideology of war in the major Asian religious traditions. Does our exploration of the ethics of war in Asian civilizations have any bearing on the pressing questions of armed conflict today? It has become clear that Islamic ethics and law contain sophisticated concepts of (...)
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  6. J. Daryl Charles (2006). War, Women, and Political Wisdom: Jean Bethke Elshtain on the Contours of Justice. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (2):339 - 369.
    One of the most perceptive and ambidextrous social commentators of our day, Augustinian scholar Jean Bethke Elshtain furnishes in ever fresh ways through her writings a bridge between the ancient and the modern, between politics and ethics, between timeless moral wisdom and cultural sensitivity. To read Elshtain seriously is to take the study of culture as well as the "permanent things" seriously. But Elshtain is no mere moralist. Neither is she content solely to dwell in the domain of the theoretical. (...)
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  7. John J. Davenport (2011). Just War Theory, Humanitarian Intervention, and the Need for a Democratic Federation. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):493-555.
    The primary purpose of government is to secure public goods that cannot be achieved by free markets. The Coordination Principle tells us to consolidate sovereign power in a single institution to overcome collective action problems that otherwise prevent secure provision of the relevant public goods. There are several public goods that require such coordination at the global level, chief among them being basic human rights. The claim that human rights require global coordination is supported in three main steps. First, I (...)
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  8. Lawrence Dennis (1980/1975). The Dynamics of War and Revolution. Institute for Historical Review.
  9. Krzysztof Dunin-Wąsowicz (2006). The Socialist Movement in the Warsaw Uprising. Dialogue and Universalism 16 (7-9):89-110.
    The decision to start the uprising rested chiefly with a few persons from the high command of the Home Army. Political authorities, including Kazimierz Pużak, PPS and the National Unity Council leader, had no influence on the Uprising outbreak and date decisions.Immediately after the uprising outbreak, the socialist movement joined the action, both in the civilian and military area, as did all socialist movement factions. A very important role was played by the well-developed and influential press, coming out in all (...)
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  10. Hans-Jürgen Eitner (1988). The Costs of Hitler's War. War Funding and the Financial Legacy of the War in Germany, 1933–1948. Philosophy and History 21 (1):61-62.
  11. Jeremy Elkins (2010). The Model of War. Political Theory 38 (2):214 - 242.
    During the past half-century, the United States has declared war on (among else) poverty, cancer, crime, drugs, and terrorism. This essay examines, in the context of these, war as a model for responding to domestic political problems and focuses on the role that that model has played in representing the state and its relation to those evils identified as the enemy.
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  12. Stephen L. Esquith (2000). War, Political Violence, and Service Learning. Teaching Philosophy 23 (3):241-254.
  13. Cécile Fabre (2012). Cosmopolitan War. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction -- Cosmopolitanism -- Collective self-defense -- Subsistence wars -- Humanitarian intervention -- Commodified wars -- Asymmetrical wars -- Conclusion.
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  14. David Fagelson (2001). Two Concepts of Sovereignty. International Politics 38 (4):499-514.
  15. Robert Fine (2007). Cosmopolitanism. New York.
    Preface : twenty theses on cosmopolitan social theory -- Taking the "ism" out of cosmopolitanism : the equivocations of the new cosmopolitanism -- Confronting reputations : Kant's cosmopolitanism and Hegel's critique -- Cosmopolitanism and political community : the equivocations of constitutional patriotism -- Cosmopolitanism and international law : from the law of peoples to the constitutionalisation of international law -- Cosmopolitanism and humanitarian military intervention : war, peace and human rights -- Cosmopolitanism and punishment : prosecuting crimes against humanity -- (...)
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  16. Jill Frank (2007). Wages of War: On Judgment in Plato's "Republic". Political Theory 35 (4):443 - 467.
  17. Trudy Govier (2006). Taking Wrongs Seriously: Acknowledgement, Reconciliation, and the Politics of Sustainable Peace. Humanity Books.
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  18. R. Griffin & D. D. Roberts (2012). Overtures of Reconciliation in a Forgotten Conflict. European Journal of Political Theory 11 (4):354-361.
  19. Yuval N. Harari (2008). The Ultimate Experience: Battlefield Revelations and the Making of Modern War Culture, 1450-2000. Palgrave Macmillan.
    For millennia, war was viewed as a supreme test. In the period 1750-1850 war became much more than a test: it became a secular revelation. This new understanding of war as revelation completely transformed Western war culture, revolutionizing politics, the personal experience of war, the status of common soldiers, and the tenets of military theory.
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  20. Virginia Held (2009). Political Solidarity. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 19 (2):89-92.
  21. Ranjoo Seodu Herr (2013). ‘Comfort Women’ and Japan’s National Responsibility. In Jun-Hyeok Kwak & Melissa Nobles (eds.), Historical Reconciliation and Inherited Responsibility. Routledge. 1--145.
  22. Alexander Keller Hirsch (2011). Fugitive Reconciliation: The Agonistics of Respect, Resentment and Responsibility in Post-Conflict Society. Contemporary Political Theory 10 (2):166.
  23. Jeff McMahan (2010). Pacifism and Moral Theory. Diametros 23:44-68.
    There is a nonabsolute or “contingent” form of pacifism that claims that war in contemporary conditions inevitably involves the killing of innocent people on a scale that is too great to be justified. Some contingent pacifists argue that war always involves a risk that virtually everyone that one might kill is innocent – either because one can never be sure that one’s cause is just or because even most of those who fight in wars that lack a just cause are (...)
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  24. Alexander Moseley, The Philosophy of War. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  25. Stephen Nathanson (2010). Terrorism and the Ethics of War. Cambridge University Press.
    Stephen Nathanson argues that we cannot have morally credible views about terrorism if we focus on terrorism alone and neglect broader issues about the ethics ...
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  26. Peter Olsthoorn (2013). Virtue Ethics in the Military. In Stan van Hooft (ed.), The Handbook of Virtue Ethics. Acumen. 365-374.
  27. Peter Olsthoorn, Myriame Bollen & Robert Beeres (2013). Dual Loyalties in Military Medical Care – Between Ethics and Effectiveness. In Herman Amersfoort, Rene Moelker, Joseph Soeters & Desiree Verweij (eds.), Moral Responsibility & Military Effectiveness. Asser.
  28. Bat-Ami Bar On (2008). The Opposition of Politics and War. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 141-154.
    At stake for this essay is the distinction between politics and war and the extent to which politics can survive war. Gender analysis reveals how high these stakes are by revealing the complexity of militarism. It also reveals the impossibility of gender identity as foundation for a more robust politics with respect to war. Instead, a non-ideal normative differentiation among kinds of violence is affirmed as that which politically cannot not be wanted.
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  29. Danielle Poe (ed.) (2011). Communities of Peace: Confronting Injustice and Creating Justice. Rodopi.
    This volume examines the many ways in which violence, domination, and oppression manifest themselves.
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  30. Danielle Poe (2010). Women as Weapons of War: Iraq, Sex, and the Media. By KELLY OLIVER. Hypatia 25 (2):469-472.
  31. Jacobus Pontanus, S. J., Paul Richard Blum & Thomas McCreight (2009). Soldier or Scholar: Stratocles or War. Apprendice House.
    ISBN-13: 978-1934074480
    Plot Summary from the book:
    "An aristocratic young man, fed up with his studies, contemplates military service. His teacher is unable by any reasoning to call him back him from the path he has embarked upon. The young man enlists another youth who commits himself to the journey, dressed in military garb, and he happens upon two deserting soldiers, unsightly and ill-used both in their dress and in their hygiene. Both young men are so moved by the deserters’ (...)
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  32. David T. Risser (1999). Violence, Oppresssion. In Christopher B. Gray (ed.), The Philosophy of Law: An Encyclopedia (vol. 2). Garland Publishing, Inc.:893-895.
  33. Klaus-Jörg Ruhl (1983). War and Risk of War. Essays on German Policy in the First World War. Philosophy and History 16 (1):88-88.
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  34. Gerhard Schulz (1982). Pearl Harbor, 7th December 1941. The Outbreak of War Between Japan and the United States and the Expansion of the European War Into the Second World War. [REVIEW] Philosophy and History 15 (1):65-67.
  35. Leslie A. Schwalm (2011). Surviving Wartime Emancipation: African Americans and the Cost of Civil War. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (1):21-27.
    The U.S. Civil War chained slave emancipation to war's violence, destruction and deprivation. The resulting health crisis, including illness, injury, and trauma, had immediate and lasting consequences. This essay explores the impact of ideas about race on the U.S. military's health care provisions and treatment of former slaves, both civilians and soldiers.
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  36. Sarah Sorial (2011). Politics of Violence. Critical Horizons 12 (2):163-164.
    The problem of political violence, its justifiability, and the question of how we ought to respond to it has been the subject of extensive debate since September 11, 2001, and subsequent terrorist attacks in Madrid (2004), London (2005), Bali (2005) and Mumbai (2008). The phenomenon of political violence is by no means new; nor have the measures taken by Western governments in response to recent terrorist attacks been unprecedented.
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  37. Eileen Sowerby (1997). On War: Men, War, and Women. Wantok.
  38. Shari Stone-Mediatore (2010). Epistemologies of Discomfort: What Military-Family Anti-War Activists Can Teach Us About Knowledge of Violence. Studies in Social Justice 4 (1):25-45.
    This paper examines the particular relevance of feminist critiques of epistemic authority in contexts of institutionalized violence. Reading feminist criticism of “experts” together with theorists of institutionalized violence, Stone-Mediatore argues that typical expert modes of thinking are incapable of rigorous knowledge of institutionalized violence because such knowledge requires a distinctive kind of thinking-within-discomfort for which conventionally trained experts are ill-suited. The author demonstrates the limitations of “expert” modes of thinking with reference to writings on the Iraq war by Michael Ignatieff (...)
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  39. Ernesto Verdeja (2010). Official Apologies in the Aftermath of Political Violence. Metaphilosophy 41 (4):563-581.
    Abstract: This article examines the uses of official apologies for massive human rights abuses in the context of democratic transitions. It sketches a normative model of apologies, highlighting how they serve to provide some moral and practical redress for past wrongs. It discusses a number of contributions apologies can make, including publicly confirming the status of victims as moral agents, fostering public reexamination and deliberation about social norms, and promoting critical understandings of history that undermine apologist historical accounts. The article (...)
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  40. Brandon Warmke (2010). Bending the Rules: Morality in the Modern World From Relationships to Politics and War. Philosophical Psychology 23 (1):129-132.