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  1. Kelly H. Ball (2009). Producing Populations: Biopolitics, The Family, and Experiences of Queer Foster Youth. Journal of Family Life.
  2. Zbigniew Bańkowski & John H. Bryant (eds.) (1995). Poverty, Vulnerability, the Value of Human Life, and the Emergence of Bioethics: Highlights and Papers of the Xxviiith Cioms Conference, Ixtapa, Guerrero State, Mexico, 17-20 April 1994. [REVIEW] Cioms.
  3. Zbigniew Bańkowski, John H. Bryant & J. Gallagher (eds.) (1997). Ethics, Equity, and the Renewal of Who's Health-for-All Strategy: Proceedings of the Xxixth Cioms Conference, Geneva, Switzerland 12-14 March 1997. [REVIEW] Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (Cioms).
  4. Sarah Banks (2008). Ethics and Social Welfare: The State of Play. Ethics and Social Welfare 2 (1):1-9.
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  5. Colin Barnes (2007). Direct Payments and Their Future: An Ethical Concern? Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (3):348-354.
    Recent policy developments in the general area of disability have presented a whole range of ethical dilemmas for everyone involved in the development and delivery of services for disabled people at the national and local levels. This is almost certainly due to government acceptance of the principles of independent living and the social model of disability, and greater user involvement and control of support services, in particular ?direct payments?. This paper will centre on the ethical concerns that arise from recent (...)
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  6. Norman P. Barry (1990). The Philosophy of the Welfare State. Critical Review 4 (4):545-568.
    A critical survey of the major philosophical arguments that have been used to justify the institutions and policies of contemporary welfare states considers the claims of rights theory, egalitarianism, and citizenship and communitarian doctrines. It finds that these arguments are both internally confused and inconsistent with conventional welfare policies. It is argued that the welfare state itself has serious ambiguities: it claims to cater for the needy, as part of its ?public good?; obligations, yet in practice it delivers a range (...)
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  7. David T. Beito (1990). Mutual Aid for Social Welfare: The Case of American Fraternal Societies. Critical Review 4 (4):709-736.
    With the possible exception of churches, fraternal societies were the leading providers of social welfare in the United States before the Great Depression. Their membership reached an estimated 50 percent of the adult male population and they were especially strong among immigrants and African Americans. Unlike the adversarial relationships engendered by governmental welfare programs and private charity, fraternal social welfare rested on a foundation of reciprocity between donor and recipient. By the 1920s, fraternal societies and other mutual aid institutions had (...)
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  8. Thomas Bender (1996). Clients or Citizens? Critical Review 10 (1):123-134.
    Abstract John McKnight's The Careless Society tellingly exposes the ways the professionalized welfare state creates dependency. But McKnight is too quick to condemn this result as the product of professional self?interest, and to posit as the alternative a selfless, republican model of community. He overlooks the more realistic possibility that the pursuit of their interests by social groups empowered to take care of themselves would better serve those interests, and would simultaneously create a feeling of interdependence and civic responsibility.
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  9. Simon Birnbaum (2010). Radical Liberalism, Rawls and the Welfare State: Justifying the Politics of Basic Income. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (4):495-516.
  10. Patrick Boleyn‐Fitzgerald (1999). Misfortune, Welfare Reform, and Right‐Wing Egalitarianism. Critical Review 13 (1-2):141-163.
    Abstract A close look at the rhetoric in America's recent welfare?reform debate has both surprising and important implications for political philosophy. Political philosophers typically presume that opponents of redistribution are motivated by considerations other than equality. Recent arguments for welfare reform, however, have been formulated in a manner consistent with most contemporary egalitarian theories. This result should make us question either the political relevance of egalitarian ideals or the adequacy of those theories of equality.
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  11. Jens Borchert (1996). Welfare‐State Retrenchment: Playing the National Card. Critical Review 10 (1):63-94.
    Abstract An analysis of welfare?state restructuring under conservative governments during the 1980s undermines the notion that the nation?state is being rendered obsolete by economic globalization. The nation?state is still the principal site of political conflict. Yet this conflict has to be analyzed in light of global economic and cultural pressures. Conservative attempts to restructure the welfare state were parallel events within a larger transition in the world economy, but they had decisively distinct national trajectories.
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  12. Kerry Brace (1992). Nonrelativist Ethical Standards for Goal Setting in Psychotherapy. Ethics and Behavior 2 (1):15 – 38.
    In this article, I discuss two principles that can be viewed as universally applicable in psychotherapy and counseling: respect for clients' welfare and respect for their self-determination. Consideration of the practical application of these principles leads to the formulation of a set of guidelines to aid therapists and counselors in making choices about instrumental and end goals. These guidelines are intended to be applicable regardless of the particular personal and cultural values of the therapist and client.
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  13. John Broome (1994). Discounting and Welfare. Philosophy and Public Affairs 23 (2):128-56.
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  14. Samuel Allen Chambers & Terrell Carver (eds.) (2011). Carole Pateman: Democracy, Feminism, Welfare. Routledge.
  15. Donald Coggan (1977). On Dying and Dying Well. Royal Society of Medicine.
    The idea of a happy death is one that startles and disgusts modern man. However, although that phrase is not often used today, that is what the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Donald Coggan, is to some extent considering in his Edwin Stevens lecture given to the Royal Society of Medicine. We are publishing extracts from that lecture by kind permission of the President of the Royal Society of Medicine. We have chosen those passages in the lecture which discuss the limits (...)
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  16. Stephen L. Darwall (2002). Welfare and Rational Care. Princeton University Press.
    "This book proposes a new view on a central topic in contemporary ethics.
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  17. Steve Daskal (2010). Libertarianism Left and Right, the Lockean Proviso, and the Reformed Welfare State. Social Theory and Practice 36 (1):21-43.
    This paper explores the implications of libertarianism for welfare policy. There are two central arguments. First, the paper argues that if one adopts a libertarian framework, it makes most sense to be a Lockean right-libertarian. Second, the paper argues that this form of libertarianism leads to the endorsement of a fairly extensive set of redistributive welfare programs. Specifically, the paper argues that Lockean right-libertarians are committed to endorsing welfare programs under which the receipt of benefits is conditional on meeting a (...)
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  18. Myfanwy Davies (2013). Changing Directions of the British Welfare State. Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (1):1-3.
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  19. Hartley Dean (2011). The Ethics of Migrant Welfare. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (1):18-35.
    International migration poses a dilemma for capitalist welfare states. This paper considers the ethical dimensions of that dilemma. It begins by addressing two questions associated with the provision of social rights for migrants: first, the extent to which differential forms of social citizenship may be associated with processes of civic stratification; second, the ambiguous nature of the economic, social and cultural rights components of the international human rights framework. It then proceeds to discuss, on the one hand, existing attempts to (...)
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  20. Maria Dimova-Cookson (2012). Liberty as Welfare The Basecamp Counterpart of Positive Freedom. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 18 (2):133-165.
    L.T.Hobhouse's concept of liberty--the concept at the heart of new liberalism--is based on T.H. Green's positive freedom. However, this paper demonstrates that the former has its own distinct nature and can be usefully defined as 'liberty as welfare'. In a context of renewed interest in the link between liberty and ability/personal development, scholars have looked back to Green's positive liberty. But the complex nature of latter has led to scholarly disagreement about its definitive features. The paper argues that Hobhouse's liberty (...)
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  21. Peter H. Ditto (2008). What Would Terri Want? : Advance Directive and the Psychological Challenges of Surrogate Decision Making. In James L. Werth & Dean Blevins (eds.), Decision Making Near the End of Life: Issues, Development, and Future Directions. Brunner-Routledge.
  22. Dale Dorsey (2008). Toward a Theory of the Basic Minimum. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 7 (4):423-445.
    Many have thought that an important feature of any just society is the establishment and maintenance of a suitable basic minimum: some set of welfare achievements, resources, capabilities, and so on that are guaranteed to all. However, if a basic minimum is a plausible requirement of justice, we must have a theory — a theory of what, precisely, the state owes in terms of these basic needs or achievements and what, precisely, is the proper structure of the obligation to provide (...)
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  23. Norbert Elias (1985/2001). The Loneliness of the Dying. Continuum.
    Originally published in 1985, this is a short meditation by a great old man on people relating to other people who are dying, and the need for all of us to open ...
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  24. ElizabethAnderson (2004). Welfare, Work Requirements, and Dependant-Care. Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (3):243–256.
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  25. L. Erikkson (2008). Review Essay: Issues in Democratic Theory: Reflexive Democracy: Political Equality and the Welfare State, by Kevin Olson. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2006. 261 Pp. $35.00 (Cloth). Radical Democracy: Politics Between Abundance and Lack, Edited by Lars Tonder and Lasse Thomassen. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2005. 288 Pp. $74.95 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Political Theory 36 (4):641-646.
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  26. David Fagelson (1999). Rights And Duties. Law And Inequality 17 (1):171.
  27. N. Frazer (1987). Women, Welfare and Politics of Needs. Hypatia 3.
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  28. Helmut P. Gaisbauer, Gottfried Schweiger & Clemens Sedmak (2013). Ethical Obligations of Wealthy People: Progressive Taxation and the Financial Crisis. Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (2):141--154.
    The Financial Crisis in Europe puts pressure on welfare states and its tax systems as well as on considerations of social justice. In this paper, we would like to explore the status of the idea of progressive taxation and its justification (especially the ‘ability-to-pay’ principle) in times of a financial crisis. We will discuss it within a social justice framework following David Miller—using the principles of (i) need, (ii) merit, and (iii) equality. We will conclude that progressive taxation can be (...)
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  29. Anca Gheaus (2008). Gender Justice and the Welfare State in Post-Communism. Feminist Theory 9 (2):185-206.
    Some Romanian feminist scholars argue that welfare policies of post-communist states are deeply unjust to women and preclude them from reaching economic autonomy. The upshot of this argument is that liberal economic policy would advance feminist goals better than the welfare state. How should we read this dissonance between Western and some Eastern feminist scholarship concerning distributive justice? I identify the problem of dependency at the core of a possible debate about feminism and welfare. Worries about how decades of communism (...)
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  30. David G. Green (1993). Medical Care in Britain Before the Welfare State. Critical Review 7 (4):479-495.
    In Britain before 1911, the vast majority of the population provided medical care for themselves and had evolved a variety of schemes that checked the power of organized medicine and encouraged a steady improvement in standards. The evidence is that at the end of the nineteenth century about 5?6 percent of the population relied on the poor law, 10?15 percent on free care from charitable institutions, 75 percent on mutual aid, and the remainder paid fees to private doctors.
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  31. Lena Halldenius (1998). Non-Domination and Egalitarian Welfare Politics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (3):335-353.
    In this article I will do three things: I will argue that solidarity is not necessary for political legitimacy, that non-domination is a strong candidate for legitimacy criterion, and, finally, that non-domination can legitimate the egalitarian welfare state.
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  32. John Harris (2000). The Welfare of the Child. Health Care Analysis 8 (1):27-34.
    The interests or welfare of the child are rightly central to anydiscussion of the ethics of reproduction. The problematic nature of thislegitimate concern is seldom, if ever, noticed or if it is, it ismisunderstood. A prominent example of this sort of misunderstandingoccurs in the Department of Health's recent and important `SurrogacyReview' chaired by Margaret Brazier (The Brazier Report) and thesame misunderstanding makes nonsense of at least one provision of theHuman Fertilization and Embryology Act 1990. (The HFE Act).This paper explores and (...)
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  33. Daniel Hicks (2012). Scientific Practices and Their Social Context. Dissertation, U. of Notre Dame
    My dissertation combines philosophy of science and political philosophy. Drawing directly on the work of Alasdair MacIntyre and inspired by John Dewey, I develop two rival conceptions of scientific practice. I show that these rivals are closely linked to the two basic sides in the science and values debate -- the debate over the extent to which ethical and political values may legitimately influence scientific inquiry. Finally, I start to develop an account of justice that is sensitive to these legitimate (...)
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  34. Yoshinori Hiroi (2011). Visions of the Sustainable Welfare Society: Extending Social Quality Into an Asian/Developmental Context. International Journal of Social Quality 1 (1):19-31.
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  35. Nils Holtug (2003). Welfarism – The Very Idea. Utilitas 15 (02):151-.
    According to outcome welfarism, roughly, the value of an outcome is fundamentally a matterof the individual welfare it contains. I assess various suggestions as to how to spell out this idea more fully on the basis of some basic intuitions about the content and implications of welfarism. I point out that what are in fact different suggestions are often conflated and argue that none fully captures the basic intuitions. I then suggest that what this means is that different doctrines of (...)
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  36. Axel Honneth & Marco Solinas (2010). Capitalismo e riconoscimento. Firenze University Press.
    Capitalismo e riconoscimento" presenta, in cinque saggi per la prima volta raccolti insieme e tradotti in italiano, una densa e pregnante analisi di taluni cruciali processi socio-strutturali, morali e normativi delle società capitalistiche contemporanee dalla prospettiva delle dinamiche del reciproco riconoscimento e del disrispetto concernenti la sfera del lavoro. Particolare attenzione è dedicata ai paradossali rovesciamenti delle istanze di autorealizzazione, autonomia e responsabilità personale registratisi negli ultimi decenni nel quadro di un mercato del lavoro sempre più deregolato.
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  37. George Klosko (2009). Cosmopolitanism, Political Obligation, and the Welfare State. Political Theory 37 (2):243 - 265.
    While we generally take it for granted that governments should provide social welfare and other benefits to their citizens, justification of these services depends on special moral requirements people owe to their compatriots, as opposed to inhabitants of other countries, who may be far more needy. While widely discussed defenses of compatriot preferences can be seen to be flawed, the latter may be justified through a public goods argument. Security and other public goods are not only necessary for acceptable lives (...)
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  38. Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). Peter Corning: The Fair Society: The Science of Human Nature and the Pursuit of Social Justice. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 27 (2):313-320.
    Peter Corning: The Fair Society: The science of human nature and the pursuit of social justice Content Type Journal Article Category Review Essay Pages 1-8 DOI 10.1007/s10539-011-9304-0 Authors Holly Lawford-Smith, Centre for Applied Ethics and Public Philosophy, Charles Sturt University, Canberra, Australia Journal Biology and Philosophy Online ISSN 1572-8404 Print ISSN 0169-3867.
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  39. Christian List (2003). Are Interpersonal Comparisons of Utility Indeterminate? Erkenntnis 58 (2):229 - 260.
    On the orthodox view in economics, interpersonal comparisons of utilityare not empirically meaningful, and ``hence'' impossible. To reassess this view, this paper draws onthe parallels between the problem of interpersonal comparisons of utility and the problem of translation of linguisticmeaning, as explored by Quine. I discuss several cases of what the empirical evidence for interpersonal comparisonsof utility might be and show that, even on the strongest of these, interpersonal comparisons are empiricallyunderdetermined and, if we also deny any appropriate truth of (...)
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  40. Christian List, Multidimensional Inequality Measurement: A Proposal.
    Two essential intuitions about the concept of multidimensional inequality have been highlighted in the emerging body of literature on this subject: first, multidimensional inequality should be a function of the uniform inequality of a multivariate distribution of goods or attributes across people (Kolm, 1977); and, second, it should also be a function of the cross-correlation between distributions of goods or attributes in different dimensions (Atkinson and Bourguignon, 1982; Walzer, 1983). While the first intuition has played a major role in the (...)
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  41. Christian List, Multidimensional Welfare Aggregation.
    Most accounts of welfare aggregation in the tradition of Arrow's (1951/1963) and Sen's (1970/1979) social-choice-theoretic frameworks represent the welfare of an individual in terms of a single welfare ordering or a single scalar-valued welfare function. I develop a multidimensional generalization of Arrow's and Sen's frameworks, representing individual welfare in terms of multiple personal welfare functions, corresponding to multiple 'dimensions' of welfare. I show that, as in the one-dimensional case, the existence of attractive aggregation procedures depends on certain informational assumptions, specifically (...)
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  42. Ignacio Mastroleo (2012). Guías para los comités de ética de investigación del Reino Unido sobre atención de la salud después de la investigación: un comentario crítico sobre la traducción al español del borrador versión 8.0. Perspectivas Bioéticas 17 (33):71-81.
    [RESUMEN] Este trabajo es un comentario sobre la primera traducción al español de las guías del Reino Unido “Atención después de la investigación: un marco para los comités de ética de investigación del NHS (borrador versión 8.0)”. El comentario se divide en tres partes. En la primera parte, se busca resumir la información básica necesaria para mejorar la lectura comprensiva de la traducción de las guías. En la segunda parte, se analiza una selección de la normativa argentina que trata sobre (...)
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  43. David McCarthy (2013). Risk-Free Approaches to the Priority View. Erkenntnis 78 (2):421-449.
    Parfit advertised the priority view as a new and fundamental theory in the ethics of distribution. He never discusses risk, and many writers follow suit when discussing the priority view. This article formalizes two popular arguments for a commonly accepted risk-free definition of the priority view. One is based on a direct attempt to define the priority view, the other is based on a contrast with utilitarianism and egalitarianism. But neither argument succeeds, and more generally, it is not possible to (...)
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  44. David McCarthy (2006). Utilitarianism and Prioritarianism I. Economics and Philosophy 22 (3):335-363.
    Utilitarianism and prioritarianism make a strong assumption about the uniqueness of measures of how good things are for people, or for short, individual goodness measures. But it is far from obvious that the presupposition is correct. The usual response to this problem assumes that individual goodness measures are determined independently of our discourse about distributive theories. This article suggests reversing this response. What determines the set of individual goodness measures just is the body of platitudes we accept about distributive theories. (...)
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  45. Thaddeus Metz (2014). Gross National Happiness: A Philosophical Appraisal. Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (3):218-232.
    For more than 40 years, the Kingdom of Bhutan has eschewed evaluating its socio-economic status in terms of Gross Domestic Product and has instead done so under the heading of ‘Gross National Happiness’. As part of the upswing in international interest in well-being as the proper final end of development, it would be apt to critically explore the approach that has been in use for several decades. In this article I expound the central elements of Gross National Happiness and discuss (...)
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  46. Jeesoo Nam (2013). Biomedical Enhancements as Justice. Bioethics 28 (8).
    Biomedical enhancements, the applications of medical technology to make better those who are neither ill nor deficient, have made great strides in the past few decades. Using Amartya Sen's capability approach as my framework, I argue in this article that far from being simply permissible, we have a prima facie moral obligation to use these new developments for the end goal of promoting social justice. In terms of both range and magnitude, the use of biomedical enhancements will mark a radical (...)
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  47. Jan Narveson, 9. “Liberty, Property, and Welfare Rights: Brettschneider's Argument.”.
    Brettschneider argues that the granting of property rights to all entails a right of exclusion by acquirer/owners against all others, that this exclusionary right entails ..
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  48. David Rondel & Alex Sager (2012). Kai Nielsen’s Political Philosophy: A Critical Introduction and Overview. In David Rondel & Alex Sager (eds.), Pessimism of the Intellect, Optimism of the Will: The Political Philosophy of Kai Nielsen. University of Calgary Press.
  49. Brooke A. Schneider (2003). Child Welfare: Court May Determine Whether Life-Sustaining Treatment Should Be Withdrawn. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (2):316-317.
  50. John W. Seaman (1988). Thomas Paine: Ransom, Civil Peace, and the Natural Right to Welfare. Political Theory 16 (1):120-142.
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