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  1. C. Fred Alford (2001). Whistleblowers and the Narrative of Ethics. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (3):402–418.
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  2. Stephanos Avakian & Joanne Roberts (2012). Whistleblowers in Organisations: Prophets at Work? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (1):71-84.
    This article argues that the study of biblical prophets offers a profound contribution to understanding the experience, role and attributes of whistleblowers. Little is known in the literature about the moral triggers that lead individuals to blow the whistle in organisations or why whistleblowers may show persistence against the harshness experienced as a result of their actions. This article argues that our understanding of the whistleblower’s work is highly informed by appreciating how moral values and norms are exercised by prophets (...)
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  3. Tim Barnett (1992). A Preliminary Investigation of the Relationship Between Selected Organizational Characteristics and External Whistleblowing by Employees. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (12):949 - 959.
    Whistleblowing by employees to regulatory agencies and other parties external to the organization can have serious consequences both for the whistleblower and the company involved. Research has largely focused on individual and group variables that affect individuals'' decision to blow the whistle on perceived wrongdoing.This study examined the relationship between selected organizational characteristics and the perceived level of external whistleblowing by employees in 240 organizations. Data collected in a nationwide survey of human resource executives were analyzed using analysis of variance.
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  4. Tim Barnett, Daniel S. Cochran & G. Stephen Taylor (1993). The Internal Disclosure Policies of Private-Sector Employers: An Initial Look at Their Relationship to Employee Whistleblowing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (2):127 - 136.
    Whistleblowers have usually been treated as outcasts by private-sector employers. But legal, ethical, and practical considerations increasingly compel companies to encourage employees to disclose suspected illegal and/or unethical activities throughinternal communication channels. Internal disclosure policies/procedures (IDPP''s) have been recommended as one way to encourage such communication.This study examined the relationship between IDPP''s and employee whistleblowing among private-sector employers. Almost 300 human resources executives provided data concerning their organizations'' experiences.
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  5. Kanika T. Bhal & Anubha Dadhich (2011). Impact of Ethical Leadership and Leader–Member Exchange on Whistle Blowing: The Moderating Impact of the Moral Intensity of the Issue. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (3):485-496.
    Given the prevalence of corporate frauds and the significance of whistle blowing as a mechanism to report about the frauds, the present study explores the impact of ethical leadership and leader–member exchange (LMX) on whistle blowing. Additionally, the article also explores the moderating role of the moral intensity [studied as magnitude of consequences (MOC)] of the issue on this relationship. The article reports results of three experimental studies conducted on the postgraduate students of a premier technology institute in India. Ethical (...)
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  6. Stephanic J. Bird & Diane Hoffman-Kim (1998). Damned If You Do, Damned If You Don't: The Scientific Community's Responses to Whistleblowing. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (1):3-6.
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  7. Irena Blonder (2010). Public Interests and Private Passions: A Peculiar Case of Police Whistleblowing. Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (3):258-277.
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  8. S. Bolsin (2005). Practical Virtue Ethics: Healthcare Whistleblowing and Portable Digital Technology. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (10):612-618.
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  9. Mathieu Bouville (2008). Whistle-Blowing and Morality. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):579 - 585.
    Whistle-blowing is generally considered from the viewpoint of professional morality. Morality rejects the idea of choice and the interests of the professional as immoral. Yet the dreadful retaliations against the messengers of the truth make it necessary for morality to leave a way out of whistle-blowing. This is why it forges rights (sometimes called duties) to trump the duty to the public prescribed by professional codes. This serves to hide the obvious fact that whether to blow the whistle is indeed (...)
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  10. George G. Brenkert (2010). Whistle-Blowing, Moral Integrity, and Organizational Ethics. In George G. Brenkert & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  11. Abigail Brown (2013). Understanding Pharmaceutical Research Manipulation in the Context of Accounting Manipulation. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):611-619.
    The problem of the manipulation of data that arises when there is both opportunity and incentive to mislead is better accepted and studied — though by no means solved — in financial accounting than in medicine. This article analyzes pharmaceutical company manipulation of medical research as part of a broader problem of corporate manipulation of data in the creation of accounting profits. The article explores how our understanding of accounting fraud and misinformation helps us understand the risk of similar information (...)
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  12. Brian K. Burton & Janet P. Near (1995). Estimating the Incidence of Wrongdoing and Whistle-Blowing: Results of a Study Using Randomized Response Technique. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (1):17 - 30.
    Student cheating and reporting of that cheating represents one form of organizational wrong-doing and subsequent whistle-blowing, in the context of an academic organization. Previous research has been hampered by a lack of information concerning the validity of survey responses estimating the incidence of organizational wrongdoing and whistle-blowing. An innovative method, the Randomized Response Technique (RRT), was used here to assess the validity of reported incidences of wrongdoing and whistle-blowing. Surprisingly, our findings show that estimates of these incidences did not vary (...)
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  13. Elletta Sangrey Callahan & John W. Collins (1992). Employee Attitudes Toward Whistleblowing: Management and Public Policy Implications. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 11 (12):939 - 948.
    Managers of organizations should be aware of the attitudes of employees concerning whistleblowing. Employee views should affect how employers choose to respond to whistleblowers through the evolving law of wrongful discharge.This article reports on a survey of employee attitudes toward the legal protection of whistleblowers and presents an analysis of the results of that survey.
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  14. Thomas L. Carson, Mary Ellen Verdu & Richard E. Wokutch (2008). Whistle-Blowing for Profit: An Ethical Analysis of the Federal False Claims Act. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):361 - 376.
    This paper focuses on the 1986 Amendments to the False Claims Act of 1863, which offers whistle-blowers financial rewards for disclosing fraud committed against the U.S. government. This law provides an opportunity to examine underlying assumptions about the morality of whistle-blowing and to consider the merits of increased reliance on whistle-blowing to protect the public interest. The law seems open to a number of moral objections, most notably that it exerts a morally corrupting influence on whistle-blowers. We answer these objections (...)
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  15. P. G. Cassematis & R. Wortley (2013). Prediction of Whistleblowing or Non-Reporting Observation: The Role of Personal and Situational Factors. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):615-634.
    This study examined whether it was possible to classify Australian public sector employees as either whistleblowers or non-reporting observers using personal and situational variables. The personal variables were demography (gender, public sector tenure, organisational tenure and age), work attitudes (job satisfaction, trust in management, whistleblowing propensity) and employee behaviour (organisational citizenship behaviour). The situational variables were perceived personal victimisation, fear of reprisals and perceived wrongdoing seriousness. These variables were used as predictors in a series of binary logistic regressions. It was (...)
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  16. Brianna B. Caza (2009). Making Sense of Whistle-Blowing's Antecedents. Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (4):553-586.
    Despite a significant increase in whistle-blowing practices in work organizations, we know little about what differentiates whistle-blowers from those who observe a wrongdoing but chose not to report it. In this review article, we first highlight the arenas inwhich research on whistle-blowing has produced inconsistent results and those in which the findings have been consistent. Second, we propose that the adoption of an identity approach will help clarify the inconsistent findings and extend prior work on individual-level motives behind whistle-blowing. Third, (...)
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  17. Andrew Chambers (1995). Whistleblowing and the Internal Auditor. Business Ethics 4 (4):192–198.
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  18. T. Chambers (1997). Questionable Ethics--Whistle-Blowing or Tale-Telling? Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (6):382-383.
    Renal biopsy is a potentially hazardous procedure, generally performed for therapeutic reasons. An open renal biopsy was performed when there appeared to be no accepted clinical indication and its results published in a specialty journal, whose editors declined publication of subsequent correspondence, questioning the ethical propriety of such a procedure. The implications for clinical practice, authors, editors and readers are discussed.
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  19. Randy K. Chiu (2003). Ethical Judgment and Whistleblowing Intention: Examining the Moderating Role of Locus of Control. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):65 - 74.
    The growing body of whistleblowing literature includes many studies that have attempted to identify the individual level antecedents of whistleblowing behavior. However, cross-cultural differences in perceptions of the ethicality of whistleblowing affect the judgment of whistleblowing intention. This study ascertains how Chinese managers/professionals decide to blow the whistle in terms of their locus of control and subjective judgment regarding the intention of whistleblowing. Hypotheses that are derived from these speculations are tested with data on Chinese managers and professionals (n = (...)
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  20. Derek Dalton & Robin R. Radtke (2013). The Joint Effects of Machiavellianism and Ethical Environment on Whistle-Blowing. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):153-172.
    Given the importance of the Machiavellianism construct on informing a wide range of ethics research, we focus on gaining a better understanding of Machiavellianism within the whistle-blower context. In this regard, we examine the effect of Machiavellianism on whistle-blowing, focusing on the underlying mechanisms through which Machiavellianism affects whistle-blowing. Further, because individuals who are higher in Machiavellianism (high Machs) are expected to be less likely to report wrongdoing, we examine the ability of an organization’s ethical environment to increase whistle-blowing intentions (...)
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  21. Natalie Dandekar (1991). Can Whistleblowing Be FULLY Legitimated? Business and Professional Ethics Journal 10 (1):89-108.
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  22. Natalie Dandekar (1990). Contrasting Consequences: Bringing Charges of Sexual Harassment Compared with Other Cases of Whistleblowing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 9 (2):151 - 158.
    The phenomenon of whistleblowing seems puzzling in that whistleblowing presumably brings a wrongful practice to the attention of those with power to correct the situation. In this respect, whistleblowers act to serve the public interest in defeating harmful, illegal and unjust practices. Yet these persons suffer vilification and worse, not only from their fellow employees, but from members of the general public as well. Cases in which members of a discriminated minority report instances of job discrimination, and especially instances of (...)
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  23. Michael Davis (2012). Rewarding Whistleblowers. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):269-277.
    Since 2010, Section 922 of the Dodd-Frank Act has required the Securities and Exchange Commission to give a significant financial reward to any whistleblower who voluntarily discloses original information concerning fraud or other unlawful activity. How, if at all, might such “incentives” change our understanding of whistleblowing? My answer is that, while incentives should not change the definition of whistleblowing, it should change our understanding of the justification of whistleblowing. We need to distinguish the public justification of whistleblowing, its public (...)
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  24. Michael Davis (1996). Some Paradoxes of Whistleblowing. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 15 (1):3-19.
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  25. Wayne H. Decker & Thomas J. Calo (2007). Observers' Impressions of Unethical Persons and Whistleblowers. Journal of Business Ethics 76 (3):309 - 318.
    Since there have been many recent occurrences of alleged wrongdoing by business persons and other professionals, it seems additional ethics research is needed to obtain knowledge that will impact real-world behavior. An empirical study assessed business students’ impressions of hypothetical wrongdoers and whistleblowers. To some extent, impressions of an unethical executive and a whistleblower were influenced by the same variables and in opposite directions. Female respondents judged the unethical executive less favorably and the whistleblower more favorably than did males. The (...)
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  26. Thomas W. Dunfee & Virginia G. Maurer (1992). Corporate Attorney Whistle-Blowing: Devising a Proper Standard. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 11 (3/4):3-39.
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  27. Terry Morehead Dworkin & Janet P. Near (1997). A Better Statutory Approach to Whistle-Blowing. Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (1):1-16.
    Statutory approaches toward whistle-blowing currently appear to be based on the assumption that most observers of wrongdoing willreport it unless deterred from doing so by fear of retaliation. Yet our review of research from studies of whistle-blowing behavior suggests that this assumption is unwarranted. We propose that an alternative legislative approach would prove more successful in encouraging valid whistle-blowing and describe a model for such legislation that would increase self-monitoring of ethical behavior by organizations, with obvious benefits to society at (...)
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  28. Frederick A. Elliston (1986). Whistleblowing. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (2):25-36.
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  29. Frederick A. Elliston (1982). Anonymity and Whistleblowing. Journal of Business Ethics 1 (3):167 - 177.
    This paper examines the moral arguments for and against employees' blowing the whistle on illegal or immoral actions of their employers. It asks whether such professional dissidents are justified in disclosing wrongdoing by others while concealing their own identity. Part I examines the concept of anonymity, distinguishing it from two similar concepts — secrecy and privacy. Part II analyzes the concept of whistleblowing using recent definitions by Bok, Bowie and De George. Various arguments against anonymous whistleblowing are identified and evaluated. (...)
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  30. Frederick A. Elliston (1982). Civil Disobedience and Whistleblowing: A Comparative Appraisal of Two Forms of Dissent. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 1 (1):23 - 28.
    This paper compares and evaluates two forms of dissent: civil disobedience — protests by citizens against the laws or actions of their government; and whistleblowing — disclosure by employees of illegal, immoral or questionable practices by their employees. Each is identified, the conceptual issues are distinguished from strategic and normative ones and parallel moral questions posed. Should one first dissent within prescribed channels before going outside them? Should one act publicly or is withholding one's identity permissible or desirable? What is (...)
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  31. Claire B. Ernhart, Sandra Scarr & David F. Geneson (1993). On Being a Whistleblower: The Needleman Case. Ethics and Behavior 3 (1):73 – 93.
    We believe that members of the scientific community have a primary obligation to promote integrity in research and that this obligation includes a duty to report observations that suggest misconduct to agencies that are empowered to examine and evaluate such evidence. Consonant with this responsibility, we became whistleblowers in the case of Herbert Needleman. His 1979 study (Needleman et al., 1979), on the effects of low-level lead exposure on children, is widely cited and highly influential in the formulation of public (...)
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  32. Robert Es & Gerard Smit (2003). Whistleblowing and Media Logic: A Case Study. Business Ethics 12 (2):144-150.
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  33. Amy J. Fredin (2011). The Effects of Anticipated Regret on the Whistleblowing Decision. Ethics and Behavior 21 (5):404 - 427.
    This article incorporates two emotion-based psychology theories into the study of whistleblowing. Particularly, it studies how one's predicted regret may differ when one is cued in to possible regret effects associated with either blowing the whistle or staying silent. Ethical scenarios with two moral intensity levels and two wrongdoing types were manipulated. Analysis of variance results based on subjects' predicted regret scores as well as subjects' descriptions of what the regret would be related to indicate several significant interactions. Findings suggest (...)
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  34. David Theo Goldberg (1988). Tuning in to Whistle Blowing. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 7 (2):85-94.
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  35. Colin Grant (2002). Whistle Blowers: Saints of Secular Culture. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 39 (4):391 - 399.
    Neither the corporate view of whistle blowers as tattle-tales and traitors, nor the more sympathethic understanding of them as tragic heroes battling corrupt or abused systems captures what is at stake in whistle blowing at its most distinctive. The courage, determination and sacrifice of the most ardent whistle blowers suggests that they only begin to be appreciated when they are seen as the saints of secular culture. Although some whistle blowers may be attempting to deflect attention from their own deficiencies (...)
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  36. David B. Greenberger, Marcia P. Miceli & Debra J. Cohen (1987). Oppositionists and Group Norms: The Reciprocal Influence of Whistle-Blowers and Co-Workers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 6 (7):527 - 542.
    Who blows the whistle — a loner or a well-liked team player? Which of them is more likely to lead a successful opposition to perceived organizational wrongdoing? The potential influence of co-worker pressures to conform on whistle-blowing activity or the likely effects of whistle-blowing on the group have not been addressed. This paper presents a preliminary model of whistle-blowing as an act of nonconformity. One implication is that the success of an opposition will depend on the characteristics of the whistle-blower (...)
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  37. Leslie Griffin (2005). The Ethical Health Lamer: Watch Out for Whistleblowers. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (1):160-162.
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  38. C. K. Gunsalus (1998). How to Blow the Whistle and Still Have a Career Afterwards. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (1):51-64.
    Filing charges of scientific misconduct can be a risky and dangerous endeavor. This article presents rules of conduct to follow when considering whether to report perceived misconduct, and a set of step-by-step procedures for responsible whistleblowing that describe how to do so once the decision to report misconduct has been made. This advice is framed within the university setting, and may not apply fully in industrial settings.
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  39. C. K. Gunsalus (1998). Preventing the Need for Whistleblowing: Practical Advice for University Administrators. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (1):75-94.
    A thoughtful and well-designed institutional response to a whistleblower starts long before a problem ever arises. Important elements include efforts by the institution’s leaders to cultivate an ethical environment, provide clear and fair personnel policies, support internal systems for resolving complaints and grievances, and be willing to address problems when they are revealed. While many institutions have well-developed procedures for handling formal grievances, systems for handling complaints at their earliest stages usually receive less attention. This article focuses on systemic elements (...)
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  40. Harold Hassink, Meinderd de Vries & Laury Bollen (2007). A Content Analysis of Whistleblowing Policies of Leading European Companies. Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):25 - 44.
    Since the introduction of the U.S. Sarbanes-Oxley Act in 2002 and several other national corporate governance codes, whistleblowing policies have been implemented in a growing number of companies. Existing research indicates that this type of governance codes has a limited direct effect on ethical or whistleblowing behaviour whereas whistleblowing policies at the corporate level seem to be more effective. Therefore, evidence on the impact of (inter)national corporate governance codes on the content of corporate whistleblowing policies is important to understand their (...)
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  41. Erika Henik (2008). Mad as Hell or Scared Stiff? The Effects of Value Conflict and Emotions on Potential Whistle-Blowers. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):111 - 119.
    Existing whistle-blowing models rely on “cold” economic calculations and cost-benefit analyses to explain the judgments and actions of potential whistle-blowers. I argue that “hot” cognitions – value conflict and emotions – should be added to these models. I propose a model of the whistle-blowing decision process that highlights the reciprocal influence of “hot” and “cold” cognitions and advocate research that explores how value conflict and emotions inform reporting decisions. I draw on the cognitive appraisal approach to emotions and on the (...)
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  42. Ann Higgins-D’Alessandro (1998). Difficulties in Understanding Reactions to Whistleblowing. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (1):25-28.
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  43. James Hollings (2013). Let the Story Go: The Role of Emotion in the Decision-Making Process of the Reluctant, Vulnerable Witness or Whistle-Blower. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):501-512.
    This paper draws on cognitive psychological theory to explain the role of emotion in the decision-making process of four reluctant, vulnerable witnesses to wrongdoing, who were persuaded to blow the whistle on matters of substantial public interest. It proposes a theoretical explanation for the role of emotion on whistle-blower or witness decision-making, based on the Iterative Reprocessing Model and drawing on appraisal-based theories of cognitive psychology. It concludes that the decision to speak is preceded by an intense emotional episode, probably (...)
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  44. J. Vernon Jensen (1987). Ethical Tension Points in Whistleblowing. Journal of Business Ethics 6 (4):321 - 328.
    This paper analyzes the number of procedural and substantive tension points with which a conscientious whistleblower struggles. Included in the former are such questions as: (1) Am I properly depicting the seriousness of the problem? (2) Have I secured the information properly, analyzed it appropriately, and presented it fairly? (3) Are my motives appropriate? (4) Have I tried fully enough to have the problem corrected within the organization? (5) Should I blow the whistle while still a member of the organization (...)
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  45. Peter B. Jubb (1999). Whistleblowing: A Restrictive Definition and Interpretation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 21 (1):77 - 94.
    Whistleblowing has been defined often and in differing ways in the literature. This paper has as its main purposes to clarify the meaning of whistleblowing and to speak for a narrow interpretation of it. A restrictive, general purpose definition is provided which contains six necessary elements: act of disclosure, actor, disclosure subject, target, disclosure recipient, and outcome.Whistleblowing is characterised as a dissenting act of public accusation against an organisation which necessitates being disloyal to that organisation. The definition differs from others (...)
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  46. Gregory Katz & Marc Lenglet (2010). Whistleblowing in French Corporations. Philosophy of Management 9 (1):103-122.
    Denunciations, disclosures and reporting: why do whistleblowing procedures create an ethical dilemma in French corporations? Since July 2006, the requirement that foreign multinationals listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) implement this practice has been met with stiff resistance in many French companies. French labor unions see this controversy as a clash between the French and Anglo-Saxon models of transparency. To understand the moral reticence of French companies towards whistleblowing, we investigate five distinct perspectives: legal, economic, historical, philosophical and (...)
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  47. Granville King (1999). The Implications of an Organization's Structure on Whistleblowing. Journal of Business Ethics 20 (4):315 - 326.
    Previous studies investigating reports of corporate or individual wrongdoing have failed to examine the effects of an organization's structure upon the decision to blow the whistle. This paper suggests that an organization's structure may perform a significant role in the decision to report versus not report an observed wrongdoing. Five organizational structures (that is, centralized, matrix, horizontal, hybrid, and divisional) were examined in regards to their effectiveness in encouraging or discouraging observers of unethical conduct channels for reporting such behavior. Discussion (...)
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  48. Michael Knoll & Rolf Dick (2013). Do I Hear the Whistle…? A First Attempt to Measure Four Forms of Employee Silence and Their Correlates. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):349-362.
    Silence in organizations refers to a state in which employees refrain from calling attention to issues at work such as illegal or immoral practices or developments that violate personal, moral, or legal standards. While Morrison and Milliken (Acad Manag Rev 25:706–725, 2000) discussed how organizational silence as a top-down organizational level phenomenon can cause employees to remain silent, a bottom-up perspective—that is, how employee motives contribute to the occurrence and maintenance of silence in organizations—has not yet been given much research (...)
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  49. James C. Lampe (1992). A Study of Whistleblowing Among Auditors. Professional Ethics 1 (3/4):137-168.
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  50. Robert A. Larmer (1992). Whistleblowing and Employee Loyalty. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (2):125 - 128.
    Discussions of whistleblowing and employee loyalty usually assume either that the concept of loyalty is irrelevant to the issue or, more commonly, that whistleblowing involves a moral choice in which the loyalty that an employee owes an employer comes to be pitted against the employee''s responsibility to serve public interest. I argue that both these views are mistaken and propose a third view which sees whistleblowing as entirely compatible with employee loyalty.
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