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  1. Rebecca Aanerud (2007). The Legacy of White Supremacy and the Challenge of White Antiracist Mothering. Hypatia 22 (2):20-38.
    : Aanerud's project is to develop an account of white antiracist mothering, using a model of maternal duty to raise antiracist white children. The author sets this project in the context of historic constructions of white mothering in the twentieth century and then contrasts the need for an exploration of white mothers raising white children against the literature of white mothers' raising children of color and mothers of color raising their own children, Once this distinction is made, Aanerud uses Collins's (...)
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  2. Rebecca Aanerud, Barbara Applebaum, Alison Bailey, Steve Garner, Robin James, Crista Lebens, Steve Martinot, Nancy McHugh, Bridget M. Newell, David S. Owen, Alexis Sartwell & Karen Teel (2014). White Self-Criticality Beyond Anti-Racism: How Does It Feel to Be a White Problem? Lexington Books.
    George Yancy gathers white scholarship that dwells on the experience of whiteness as a problem without sidestepping the question’s implications for Black people or people of color. This unprecedented reversion of the “Black problem” narrative challenges contemporary rhetoric of a color-evasive world in a critically engaging and persuasive study.
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  3. Marc D. Abrams (2003). Where Has All the White Oak Gone? BioScience 53 (10):927.
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  4. Sara Ahmed (2012). Whiteness and the General Will: Diversity Work as Willful Work. Philosophia 2 (1):1-20.
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  5. Linda Martín Alcoff (1998). What Should White People Do? Hypatia 13 (3):6 - 26.
    In this paper I explore white attempts to move toward a proactive position against racism that will amount to more than self-criticism in the following three ways: by assessing the debate within feminism over white women's relation to whiteness; by exploring "white awareness training" methods developed by Judith Katz and the "race traitor" politics developed by Ignatiev and Garvey, and; a case study of white revisionism being currently attempted at the University of Mississippi.
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  6. Malcolm Alexander (2009). Review Essay: The Many Faces of Harrison C. White: Challenges and Opportunities for Social Theory G. Reza Azarian, The General Sociology of Harrison C. White: Chaos and Order in Networks (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 97 (1):106-114.
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  7. Ricky Lee Allen (2004). Whiteness and Critical Pedagogy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (2):121–136.
  8. Sheila Allen (1995). White Women, Race Matters: The Social Construction of Whiteness. By Ruth Frankenberg. Pp. 289. (Routledge, London, 1993.) £13.99. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 27 (4):489-490.
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  9. Jami L. Anderson (2002). The White Closet. Social Philosophy Today 18:97-107.
    Whiteness theorists argue that whiteness has two essential features. First, whiteness colonizes, appropriates and controls the Other. Whiteness is, then, racist.Second, whiteness is constructed unwittingly. Whites are, it is claimed, unaware of the harms they inflict on a genocidal scale because whiteness, like the air we breathe, is “invisible” to those who construct it and are constructed by it. Whiteness is, then, innocent. I think defining whiteness as innocent racism is troubling for two reasons. First, it leaves whites unaccountable for (...)
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  10. Karen Anijar (2003). Into the Heart of Whiteness. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):29 – 31.
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  11. Barbara Applebaum (2006). Race Ignore-Ance, Colortalk, and White Complicity: White is…White Isn't1. Educational Theory 56 (3):345-362.
    In this review essay, Barbara Applebaum uses white complicity as a framework for discussing three books: Mica Pollock’s Colormute: Race Talk Dilemmas in an American School, Debra Van Ausdale and Joe R. Feagin’s The First R: How Children Learn Race and Racist, and Virginia Lea and Judy Helfand’s Identifying Race and Transforming Whiteness in the Classroom. She explains the notion of white complicity and discusses some of the deep philosophical questions involving moral responsibility and agency that arise when one acknowledges (...)
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  12. Barbara Applebaum (2005). In the Name of Morality: Moral Responsibility, Whiteness and Social Justice Education. Journal of Moral Education 34 (3):277-290.
    This paper argues that the ?traditional conception of moral responsibility? authorizes and supports denials of white complicity. First, what is meant by the ?traditional conception of moral responsibility? is delineated and the enabling and disenabling characteristics of this view are highlighted. Then, three seemingly good, antiracist discourses that white students often engage in are discussed ? the discourse of colour?blindness, the discourse of meritocracy and the discourse of individual choice ? and analysed to show how they are all grounded in (...)
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  13. Swathi Arekapudi & Mathew K. Wynia (2003). The Unbearable Whiteness of the Mainstream: Should We Eliminate, or Celebrate, Bias in Bioethics? American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):18 – 19.
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  14. Jakob Arnoldi & Scott Lash (2012). China White Value, Uncertainty and Order in the Chinese Culture Industry. Thesis Eleven 108 (1):118-132.
    This article reflects on some themes in Harrison White’s work in the context of China, where the social and cultural construction of markets is quite literal. We explore how we get markets where previously there were no markets and draw on White’s central themes of ‘uncertainty’, ‘value’ and ‘order’. We maintain a distinction, with White and with Frank Knight, of risk, on the one hand, and uncertainty, on the other, where ‘risk’ has to do with entities that are in principle (...)
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  15. Alison Bailey (forthcoming). 'White Talk' as a Barrier to Understanding Whiteness. In George Yancy (ed.), What's It Like to Be a White Problem? Lexington Books.
    My project is to explain why the question ‘How does it feel to be a white problem?’ cannot be answered in the fluttering grammar of white talk. The whiteness of white talk lies not only in its having emerged from white mouths, but also in its evasiveness—in its attempt to suppress fear and anxiety, and its consequential [if unintended] reinscription and legitimation of racist oppression. I White talk is designed, indeed scripted, for the purposes of evading, rejecting, and remaining ignorant (...)
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  16. Alison Bailey (2011). On White Shame and Vulnerabiltiy. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):472-483.
    In this paper I address a tension in Samantha Vice’s claim that humility and silence offer effective moral responses to white shame in the wake of South African apartheid. Vice describes these twin virtues using inward-turning language of moral self-repair, but she also acknowledges that this ‘personal, inward directed project’ has relational dimensions. Her failure to explore the relational strand, however, leaves her description of white shame sounding solitary and penitent. -/- My response develops the missing relational dimensions of white (...)
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  17. Alison Bailey (2010). On Intersectionality and the Whiteness of Feminist Philosophy. In George Yancy (ed.), THE CENTER MUST NOT HOLD: WHITE WOMEN PHILOSOPHERS ON THE WHITENESS OF PHILOSOPHY. Lexington Books.
    In this paper I explore some possible reasons why white feminists philosophers have failed to engage the radical work being done by non-Western women, U.S. women of color and scholars of color outside of the discipline. -/- Feminism and academic philosophy have had lots to say to one another. Yet part of what marks feminist philosophy as philosophy is our engagement with the intellectual traditions of the white forefathers. I’m not uncomfortable with these projects: Aristotle, Foucault, Sartre, Wittgenstein, Quine, Austin, (...)
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  18. Alison Bailey (2000). Locating Traitorous Identities: Toward a Theory of White Character Formation. In Sandra Harding & Uma Narayan (eds.), Hypatia. University of Indiana Press.
    This essay explores how the social location of white traitorous identities might be understood. I begin by examining some of the problematic implications of Sandra Harding's standpoint framework description of race traitors as 'becoming marginal.' I argue that the location of white traitors might be better understood in terms of their 'decentering the center.' I distinguish between 'privilege-cognizant' and 'privilege-evasive' white scripts. Drawing on the work of Marilyn Frye and Anne Braden, I offer an account of the contrasting perceptions and (...)
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  19. Alison Bailey (1999). Despising an Identity They Taught Me to Claim. In Chris J. Cuomo & Kim Q. Hall (eds.), WHITENESS: FEMINIST PHILOSOPHICAL NARRATIVES.
    This essay is a personal philosophical reflection on particular dilemma privilege-cognizant white feminists face in thinking through how to use privilege in liberatory ways. Privilege takes on a new dimension for whites who resist common defensive or guilt-ridden responses to privilege and struggle to understand the connections between ill-gotten advantages and the genuine injustices that deny humanity to peoples of color. The temptation to despise whiteness and its accompanying privilege is a common response to white privilege awareness and it is (...)
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  20. Alison Bailey (1998). Privilege: Expanding on Marilyn Frye's Oppression. Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (3):104-119.
    This essay serves as both a response and embellishment of Marilyn Frye's now classic essay "Oppression." It is meant to pick up where this essay left off and to make connections between oppression, as Frye defines it, and the privileges that result from institutional structures. This essay tries to clarify one meaning of privilege that is lost in philosophical discussions of injustice. I develop a distinction between unearned privileges and earned advantages. Clarifying the meaning of privilege as unearned structural advantage (...)
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  21. Alison Bailey (1998). Locating Traitorous Identities: Toward a View of Privilege-Cognizant White Character. Hypatia 13 (3):27 - 42.
    I address the problem of how to locate "traitorous" subjects, or those who belong to dominant groups yet resist the usual assumptions and practices of those groups. I argue that Sandra Harding's description of traitors as insiders, who "become marginal" is misleading. Crafting a distinction between "privilege-cognizant" and "privilege-evasive" white scripts, I offer an alternative account of race traitors as privilege-cognizant whites who refuse to animate expected whitely scripts, and who are unfaithful to worldviews whites are expected to hold.
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  22. Alison Bailey, Bat Ami Bar-On, Linda Lopez-McAlister, Lisa Tessman, Judy Scales-Trent & Naomi Zack (1999). Whiteness: Feminist Philosophical Reflections. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Written in an engaging narrative style these philosophical investigations undermine racist hierarchies along with false natualistic conceptions of the meanings of race and universalistic understandings of gender, by considering whiteness as it shapes and is infused by gender, class, sexuality, and culture. Central to this project are questions about how it is that culture and the state create such a wide range of different people who understand themselves as white. The essays collected here discuss how one learns to be a (...)
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  23. Alison Bailey & Jacquelyn N. Zita (2007). The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body. Hypatia 22 (2).
    Historically critical reflection on whiteness in the United States has been a long-standing practice in slave folklore and in Mexican resistance to colonialism, Asian American struggles against exploitation and containment, and Native American stories of contact with European colonizers. Drawing from this legacy and from the disturbing silence on "whiteness" in postsecondary institutions, critical whiteness scholarship has emerged in the past two decades in U.S. academies in a variety of disciplines. A small number of philosophers, critical race theorists, postcolonial theorists, (...)
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  24. Nancy S. Bell (1989). Washington Watch: Science Regains the White House. BioScience 39 (7):435-435.
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  25. Vikki Bell (1998). Taking Her Hand: Becoming, Time and the Cultural Politics of the White Wedding. Cultural Values 2 (4):463-484.
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  26. David Benatar (2012). How Does Anybody Live in This Strange Place? A Reply to Samantha Vice. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):619-361.
    This article builds on Samantha Vice’s argument on the problem of whiteness in contemporary South Africa. I will explore the thesis of invisibility regarding whiteness and argue for its relevance to the rich per se. This thesis demonstrates how white privilege and affluence, despite being glaringly visible in a concrete sense, is rendered invisible together with the mostly black poverty by which it is contrasted. The invisibility of whiteness translates and flows into the so-called ‘invisibility of richness’, which involves anyone (...)
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  27. Jennifer Benson (2014). Freedom as Going Off Script. Hypatia 29 (2):355-370.
    In this manuscript I explore an example of an over-privileged white woman who encounters two young Black men in a parking garage stairwell. Two related axioms are central to the oppressive script that lies before these subjects: the hetero-patriarchal axiom that women are not safe alone at night and the racist axiom that Black men, especially young ones, are dangerous. These axioms are intended to ensure a practical conclusion—white women and Black men are supposed to avoid each other—thereby conferring legitimacy (...)
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  28. I. Berlin (1952). WHITE, M. G. -Social Thought in America. [REVIEW] Mind 61:405.
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  29. Robert E. Birt (2004). The Bad Faith of Whiteness. In George Yancy (ed.), What White Looks Like: African-American Philosophers on the Whiteness Question. Routledge.
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  30. L. Blum (2011). Antiracist Moral Identities, or Iris Murdoch in South Africa. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (4):440-451.
    I argue that Samantha Vice understates the moral resources white people have available to them to minimize their falling into distorted ways of perceiving and responding to the world caused by bare white advantage. In doing so, she paints an unjustifiably pessimistic picture of white civic involvement in South Africa, and anywhere where white people are unjustly advantaged, such as the United States. I delineate two similar but distinct antiracist moral identities the 'white ally' and the 'person committed to racial (...)
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  31. Cathy Boeckmann (2005). Selling'Em by the Sack: White Castle and the Creation of American Food (Review). Symploke 5 (1):240-241.
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  32. Bernard Boxill (1997). Populism and Elitism in African-American Political Thought. Journal of Ethics 1 (3):209-238.
    African-American political thought finds its premises in European philosophical traditions. But these traditions often challenge African-American humanity which African-American political thought defends. African-American political thought is therefore an extended commentary on the consistency of European philosophical traditions.
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  33. W. J. Branden (2000). White on White. Critical Inquiry 27:90-121.
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  34. Sabine Broeck (2002). Will White Feminism Surrender the Default Position? Gender Studies and Whiteness. In Insa Härtel & Sigrid Schade (eds.), Body and Representation. Leske + Budrich. 83--90.
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  35. Berit Brogaard (2009). Color in the Theory of Colors? Or: Are Philosophers' Colors All White? In George Yancy (ed.), he Center Must Not Hold: White Women on The Whiteness of Philosophy.
    Let’s say that a philosophical theory is white just in case it treats the perspective of the white (perhaps Western male) as objective.1 The potential dangers of proposing or defending white theories are two-fold. First, if not all of reality is objective, a fact which I take to be established beyond doubt,2 then white theories could well turn out to be false.3 A white theory is unwarranted (and indeed false) when it treats nonobjective reality as objective. Second, by proposing or (...)
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  36. C. W. Brown & L. V. Searle (1938). The Effect of Variation in the Dose of Benzedrine Sulphate on the Activity of White Rats. Journal of Experimental Psychology 22 (6):555.
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  37. Julian Cartee (1997). Normality, Whiteness, Anthorship. In Vernon A. Rosario (ed.), Science and Homosexualities. Routledge. 155.
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  38. Angelina E. Castagno (2014). Educated in Whiteness: Good Intentions and Diversity in Schools. Univ of Minnesota Press.
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  39. Pruett Christina (2002). The Complexions Of'race'and the Rise Of'whiteness'studies. Clio 32 (1).
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  40. Tommy J. Curry (2006). Revealing Whiteness. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 34 (105):43-47.
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  41. Wigglesworth V. Dallison (1938). LRQBD 166 290 W White, 5 Barb.(N. White V Y.) 474. In Jerome Hall (ed.), Readings in Jurisprudence. Gaunt.
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  42. Wesley Demarco (2007). Little White Legends. Southwest Philosophy Review 23 (2):59-67.
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  43. George Dickie (1967). A. R. White's "Attention". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 27 (3):449.
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  44. Gail Dines (forthcoming). Racism and Representation: The Social Construction of'Blackness' and'Whiteness,'. Iris.
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  45. Wendy Doniger (2003). The Symbolism of Black and White Babies in the Myth of Parental Impression. Social Research: An International Quarterly 70 (1):1-44.
    An ancient and enduring cross-cultural mythology explores what the texts generally perceive as a paradox: the birth of white offspring to black parents, or black offspring to white parents. This mythology in the Hebrew Bible is limited to animal husbandry, but in Indian literature from the third century B.C.E. and Greek and Hebrew literature from the third or fourth century C.E. it was transferred to stories about human beings. These stories originally express a fascination with the dark skin of “Ethiopians” (...)
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  46. Martin Donougho (1989). The Woman in White. The Owl of Minerva 21 (1):65-89.
  47. Taine Duncan (2013). Review of The Center Must Not Hold: White Women Philosophers and the Whiteness of Philosophy, Edited by George Yancy. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (6):603-610.
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  48. R. Dyer (1999). White (Pp. 457-468). In Jessica Evans & Stuart Hall (eds.), Visual Culture: The Reader. Sage Publications in Association with the Open University.
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  49. M. E. (1967). One White Race or Following the Gods. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 20 (4):731-731.
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  50. Ralph Ellison (2010). Against Whiteness: Race and Psychology in the American South. Modern Intellectual History 7 (1):197-208.
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