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  1. Gerd B. Achenbach (1998). On Wisdom in Philosophical Practice. Inquiry 17 (3):5-20.
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  2. E. M. Adams (1998). Emotional Intelligence and Wisdom. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (1):1-14.
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  3. Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij (2012). What's so Good About a Wise and Knowledgeable Public? Acta Analytica 27 (2):199-216.
    Political philosophers have been concerned for some time with the epistemic caliber of the general public, qua the body that is, ultimately, tasked with political decision-making in democratic societies. Unfortunately, the empirical data paints a pretty dismal picture here, indicating that the public tends to be largely ignorant on the issues relevant to governance. To make matters worse, social psychological research on how ignorance tends to breed overconfidence gives us reason to believe that the public will not only lack knowledge (...)
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  4. Daniel Andler (forthcoming). What has Collective Wisdom to Do with Wisdom? In J. Elster & H. Landemore (eds.), Collective Wisdom. Cambridge Universuty Press.
    Conventional wisdom holds two seemingly opposed beliefs. One is that communities are often much better than individuals at dealing with certain situations or solving certain problems. The other is that crowds are usually, and some say always, at best as intelligent as their least intelligent members and at worst even less. Consistency would seem to be easily re-established by distinguishing between advanced, sophisticated social organizations which afford the supporting communities a high level of collective performance, and primitive, mob-like structures which (...)
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  5. H. E. Baber (2003). Native Wisdom. The Philosophers' Magazine 24 (24):23-24.
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  6. Jason Baehr (2012). “Two Types of Wisdom”. Acta Analytica 27 (2):81-97.
    The concept of wisdom is largely ignored by contemporary philosophers. But given recent movements in the fields of ethics and epistemology, the time is ripe for a return to this concept. This article lays some groundwork for further philosophical work in ethics and epistemology on wisdom. Its focus is the distinction between practical wisdom and theoretical wisdom or between phronesis and sophia . Several accounts of this distinction are considered and rejected. A more plausible, but also considerably more complex, account (...)
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  7. Konrad Banicki (2009). The Berlin Wisdom Paradigm: A Conceptual Analysis of a Psychological Approach to Wisdom. History and Philosophy of Psychology 11 (2):25-35.
    The main purpose of this article is to undertake a conceptual investigation of the Berlin Wisdom Paradigm: a psychological project initiated by Paul Baltes and intended to study the complex phenomenon of wisdom. Firstly, in order to provide a wider perspective for the subsequent analyses, a short historical sketch is given. Secondly, a meta-theoretical issue of the degree to which the subject matter of the Baltesian study can be identified with the traditional philosophical wisdom is addressed. The main result yielded (...)
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  8. Franz Brentano (1899). Dichtung und Weisheit. In August Ströbel (ed.), Goethe-Festschrift zum 150. Lese- und Redehalle.
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  9. Walter Brueggemann (1970). Scripture and an Ecumenical Life-Style A Study in Wisdom Theology. Interpretation 24 (1):3-19.
    Against the mood of polarization which has gripped life in all its spheres, including the church, the Bible offers another style of faith: the wisdom traditions in Scripture.
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  10. David Burton (2000). Wisdom Beyond Words? Ineffability in Yogācāra and Madhyamaka Buddhism. Contemporary Buddhism 1 (1):53-76.
    (2000). Wisdom beyond words? Ineffability in yogācāra and madhyamaka buddhism. Contemporary Buddhism: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 53-76. doi: 10.1080/14639940008573721.
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  11. T. Ryan Byerly (2013). Wisdom and Appropriate Risk-Taking. Philosophy and Theology 25 (1):109-127.
    In this paper, I argue for an account of wisdom according to which wisdom is a disposition to take appropriate risks. I show why this account should be attractive generally, and also why it should be especially attractive for someone from within the Christian Aristotelian tradition. Finally, I show why the account has certain advantages over an account of wisdom from within the Christian Platonist tradition defended recently by C. Stephen Evans.
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  12. T. Ryan Byerly (2013). Wisdom and Appropriate Risk-Taking. Philosophy and Theology 25 (1):109-127.
    In this paper, I argue for an account of wisdom according to which wisdom is a disposition to take appropriate risks. I show why this account should be attractive generally, and also why it should be especially attractive for someone from within the Christian Aristotelian tradition. Finally, I show why the account has certain advantages over an account of wisdom from within the Christian Platonist tradition defended recently by C. Stephen Evans.
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  13. Rina Marie Camus (2013). The Wiseman and the Sage: Metaphysics as Wisdom in Aristotle and the Neo-Confucian School of Principle. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 8 (1):120-139.
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  14. Bryan Caplan (2007). Have the Experts Been Weighed, Measured, and Found Wanting? Critical Review 19 (1):81-91.
    ABSTRACT Tetlock's Expert Political Judgment is a creative, careful, and mostly convincing study of the predictive accuracy of political experts. My only major complaints are that Tetlock (1) understates the predictive accuracy of experts, and (2) does too little to discourage demagogues from misinterpreting his work as a vindication of the wisdom of the average citizen. Experts have much to learn from Tetlock's epistemological audit, but there is still ample evidence that, compared to laymen, experts are very good.
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  15. David Casacuberta Sevilla (2013). The Quest for Artificial Wisdom. AI and Society 28 (2):199-207.
    The term “Contemplative sciences” refers to an interdisciplinary approach to mind that aims at a better understanding of alternative states of consciousness, like those obtained trough deep concentration and meditation, mindfulness and other “superior” or “spiritual” mental states. There is, however, a key discipline missing: artificial intelligence. AI has forgotten its original aims to create intelligent machines that could help us to understand better what intelligence is and is more worried about pragmatical stuff, so almost nobody in the field seems (...)
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  16. Li Chenggui (2006). Three Sources of Wisdom of Chinese Traditional Virtue and a Contemporary Examination. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (3):341-365.
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  17. James Daniel Collins (1962). The Lure of Wisdom. Milwaukee, Marquette University Press.
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  18. Kieran Conley (1963). A Theology of Wisdom. Dubuque, Iowa, Priory Press.
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  19. David Conway (2000). The Rediscovery of Wisdom: From Here to Antiquity in Quest of Sophia. St. Martin's Press.
    By reconstructing it and tracing its vicissitudes, David Conway rehabilitates a time-honored conception of philosophy, originating in Plato and Aristotle, which makes theoretical wisdom its aim. Wisdom is equated with possessing a demonstrably correct understanding of why the world exists and has the broad character it does. Adherents of this conception maintained the world to be the demonstrable creation of a divine intelligence in whose contemplation supreme human happiness resides. Their claims are defended against various latter-day skepticisms.
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  20. John M. Cooper (2012). Pursuits of Wisdom: Six Ways of Life in Ancient Philosophy From Socrates to Plotinus. Princeton University Press.
    In "Pursuits of Wisdom," John Cooper brings this crucial question back to life. This marvelous book will shape the way we think about and engage with ancient philosophical traditions.
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  21. Christopher Cowley (2011). Expertise, Wisdom and Moral Philosophers: A Response to Gesang. Bioethics 26 (6):337-342.
    In a recent issue of Bioethics, Bernard Gesang asks whether a moral philosopher possesses greater moral expertise than a non-philosopher, and his answer is a qualified yes, based not so much on his infallible access to the truth, but on the quality of his theoretically-informed moral justifications. I reject Gesang's claim that there is such a thing as moral expertise, although the moral philosopher may well make a valid contribution to the ethics committee as a concerned and educated citizen. I (...)
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  22. Małgorzata Czarnocka (2006). Wisdom—Outdated or Not? A Comment to Approaches to the Study of Wisdom by Andrew Targowski. Dialogue and Universalism 16 (11/12):155-157.
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  23. Stephen Donatelli (2002). Vico's Topical Conception of Civil Wisdom. New Vico Studies 20:25-36.
    With the celebrated frontispiece to the New Science (1744) and through an immediate comparison of this image to the ancient moral fable inscribed in the Tablet of Cebes the Theban, Vico ingeniously employs a then well-known common topic and a conventional emblematic device to inaugurate his topics-based philosophy. A topical knowledge of the human cannot, for Vico, be seized by precept only; it must be undergone as an active and imaginative recovery of the topics through memory. In times of need, (...)
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  24. John K. Downey (1997). I. A Conversation on The Wisdom of Religious Commitment by Terrence W. Tilley. Philosophy and Theology 10 (1):65-70.
    Tilley argues that since religions are not summaries of bloodless beliefs but embodied communal practices, the heuristic for the justification of beliefs must shift. Although some of the lines of this shift to practical wisdom remain vague, Tilley has taken philosophy of religion in an excellent direction. Attention to these questions would sharpen his sketch: Why abandon linguistic philosophy with no attention to the help one might receive from the embodied linguistic practice of the later Wittgenstein? What grounds the wisdom (...)
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  25. Meister Eckhart (2004). Wisdom as Non-Wisdom in the Zhuangzi, the Prajnaparam1ta, And. Wisdom in China and the West 22:23.
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  26. C. Stephen Evans (2010). Wisdom as Conceptual Understanding. Faith and Philosophy 27 (4):369-381.
    This article argues that Platonism provides a plausible account of wisdom, one that is especially attractive for Christians. Christian Platonism sees wisdom as conceptual understanding; it is a “knowledge of the Forms.” To be convincing this view requires us to see understanding as including an appreciation of the relations between concepts as well as the value of the possible ways of being that concepts disclose. If the Forms are Divine Ideas, then we can see why God is both supremely wise (...)
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  27. Walter Fales (1946). Wisdom and Responsibility. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.
    It is one thesis of this book that an argument cannot really be understood unless it is seen in its context and in its intent.
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  28. Arthur Falk (1995). Wisdom Updated. Philosophy of Science 62 (3):389-403.
    Given the personalist's latitudinarian conception of rationality, what is progress toward wisdom? An answer is in C. I. Lewis's concept of the "congruence" of propositions, propositions so related that the antecedent probability of any one of them will be increased if the remainder can be assumed. This effect can be modelled in the probability calculus with due attention to the temporal sequencing of our learning of contingent propositions without ever becoming certain of them, as Jeffrey proposes. A diachronic bootstrapping effect (...)
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  29. Iskra Fileva & Jon Tresan (2013). Wisdom Beyond Rationality: A Reply to Ryan. Acta Analytica 28 (2):229-235.
    We discuss Sharon Ryan’s Deep Rationality Theory of wisdom, defended recently in her “Wisdom, Knowledge and Rationality.” We argue that (a) Ryan’s use of the term “rationality” needs further elaboration; (b) there is a problem with requiring that the wise person possess justified beliefs but not necessarily knowledge; (c) the conditions of DRT are not all necessary; (d) the conditions are not sufficient. At the end of our discussion, we suggest that there may be a problem with the very assumption (...)
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  30. Dylan Futter (2013). Socrates' Human Wisdom. Dialogue 52 (1):61-79.
    The concept of human wisdom is fundamental for an understanding of the Apology. But it has not been properly understood. The received interpretations offer insufficient resources for explaining how Socrates could have been humanly wise before Apollophilosophiaeven though he did not know that he did. The analysis is confirmed by its resolution of some enduring difficulties in the interpretation of Apology, in particular, the question of why Socrates continued to search for knowledge he thought impossible to attain.
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  31. Shaun Gallagher (2007). Moral Agency, Self-Consciousness, and Practical Wisdom. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (s 5-6):199-223.
    This paper argues that self-consciousness and moral agency depend crucially on both embodied and social aspects of human existence, and that the capacity for practical wisdom, phronesis, is central to moral personhood. The nature of practical wisdom is elucidated by drawing on rival analyses of expertise. Although ethical expertise and practical wisdom differ importantly, they are alike in that we can acquire them only in interaction with other persons and through habituation. The analysis of moral agency and practical wisdom is (...)
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  32. Stephen R. Grimm (forthcoming). Wisdom in Theology. In William and Frederick Abraham and Aquino (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Epistemology of Theology.
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  33. Stephen R. Grimm (2014). Wisdom. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    What is it that makes someone wise, or one person wiser than another? I argue that wisdom consists in knowledge of how to live well, and that this knowledge of how to live well is constituted by various further kinds of knowledge. One concern for this view is that knowledge is not needed for wisdom but rather some state short of knowledge, such as having rational or justified beliefs about various topics. Another concern is that the emphasis on knowing how (...)
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  34. Stephen S. Hall (2010). Wisdom: From Philosophy to Neuroscience. Alfred A. Knopf.
    Wisdom defined (sort of) What is wisdom? ; The wisest man in the world : the philosophical roots of wisdom ; Heart and mind : the psychological roots of wisdom -- Eight neural pillars of wisdom. Emotional regulation : the art of coping ; Knowing what's important : the neural mechanism of establishing value and making a judgment ; Moral reasoning : the biology of judging right from wrong ; Compassion : the biology of loving-kindness and empathy ; Humility : (...)
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  35. Charles Hartshorne (1987). Wisdom as Moderation: A Philosophy of the Middle Way. State University of New York Press.
    This work brings to a new focus the unity of Hartshorne's thought as a whole, showing the relationship between good philosophical sense and good common sense.
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  36. Jasper Hopkins, Nicholas of Cusa on Wisdom and Knowledge.
    A. Historical Context. The ancient philosophers regarded wisdom (sofiva) as an excellence (ajrethv). Plato devoted much of the Pro- tagoras to a “proof” that holiness (oJsiovth"), courage (ajndreiva), justice (dikaiosuvnh), and self-control (swfrosuvvnh) are but variants of wisdom, which he there also sometimes referred to as knowledge (ejpisthvmh). In not distinguishing explicitly between either various notions of wisdom or various notions of knowledge, Plato—or, at least, the Platonic Socrates—found himself troubled as to whether moral excellence, i.e., moral virtue, could be (...)
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  37. Rosalind Hursthouse (2006). Practical Wisdom: A Mundane Account. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (3):283–307.
    The prevailing accounts of Aristotle's view of practical wisdom pay little attention to all the intellectual capacities discussed in Nicomachean Ethics Book 6. They also contrast the phronimos with the wicked, the continent or the incontinent, rather than with those who have 'natural virtue' (innate or habituated), and thereby they neglect the importance of experience, through which those capacities are acquired. When we consider them, we can see what sort of experience is needed and hence what sort aspirants to full (...)
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  38. Russell E. Jones (2013). Wisdom and Happiness in Euthydemus 278–282. Philosophers' Imprint 13 (14).
    Plato’s Socrates is often thought to hold that wisdom or virtue is sufficient for happiness, and Euthydemus 278-282 is often taken to be the locus classicus for this sufficiency thesis in Plato’s dialogues. But this view is misguided: Not only does Socrates here fail to argue for, assert, or even implicitly assume the sufficiency thesis, but the thesis turns out to be hard to square with the argument he does give. I argue for an interpretation of the passage that explains (...)
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  39. Ward E. Jones (forthcoming). Wisdom as an Aim of Higher Education. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-15.
    IntroductionA central concern of theoretical speculation about education is the kind of epistemic states that education can and should aim to achieve. One such epistemic state, long neglected in both education theory and philosophy, is wisdom. Might wisdom be something that educators should aim for? And might it be something that their students can achieve? My answer will be a qualified yes.One qualification derives from the fact that in the present paper I will only be concerned with the potentiality of (...)
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  40. Robert Kane (2010). Ethics and the Quest for Wisdom. Cambridge University Press.
    Modernity has challenged the ancient ideal of a universal quest for wisdom, and today's world of conflicting cultures and values has raised further doubts regarding the possibility of objective ethical standards. Robert Kane refocuses the debate on the philosophical quest for wisdom, and argues that ethical principles about right action and the good life can be seen to emerge from that very quest itself. His book contends that the search for wisdom involves a persistent striving to overcome narrowness of vision (...)
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  41. Daniel A. Kaufman (2006). Knowledge, Wisdom, and the Philosopher. Philosophy 81 (1):129-151.
    The overarching thesis of this essay is that despite the etymological relationship between the word ‘philosophy’ and wisdom—the word ‘philosophos’, in Greek, means ‘lover of wisdom’—and irrespective of the longstanding tradition of identifying philosophers with ‘wise men’—mainline philosophy, historically, has had little interest in wisdom and has been preoccupied primarily with knowledge. Philosophy, if we are speaking of the mainline tradition, has had and continues to have more in common with the natural and social sciences than it does with the (...)
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  42. Michael K. Kellogg (2012). The Greek Search for Wisdom. Prometheus Books.
    Homer and the heroic ideal -- Hesiod, poet of everyday life -- Aeschylus and the institution of justice -- Sophocles, the Theban plays -- Euripides and the twilight of the gods -- The inquiries of Herodotus of Halicarnassus -- Thucydides, power and pathos -- Aristophanes and the serious business of comedy -- Plato, philosophy, and poetry -- Aristotle and the invention of political science.
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  43. Stanisław Kowalczyk (2006). Topicality of St. Augustine's Concept of Wisdom. Dialogue and Universalism 16 (5-6):83-89.
    St. Augustine’s idea of wisdom partly studied by H. I. Marrou, F. Cayré, J. Maritain and E. Gilson, is more universal than Aristotle’s or Thomas Aquinas’. For the Bishop of Hippo the term sapientia can designate, on the supernatural plane, God’s nature, the life of grace, contemplation of God, and, on the natural plane, contemplation of truth or even man’s ethical life.The purpose of this paper is to examine in what relationship theoretical wisdom, which Augustine identifies with philosophy, and learning (...)
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  44. Peter Lampe (1990). Theological Wisdom and the “Word About the Cross” The Rhetorical Scheme in I Corinthians 1–4. Interpretation 44 (2):117-131.
    Aware of the party strife that plagued the church at Corinth, Paul addresses it briefly and then begins a discourse on wisdom that seems unrelated to the problem of parties—but perhaps not so unrelated after all.
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  45. William Lyons (2009). Conscience – an Essay in Moral Psychology. Philosophy 84 (4):477-494.
    The ultimate aim of this essay is to suggest that conscience is a very important part of human psychology and of our moral point of view, not something that can be dismissed as merely ‘a part of Christian theology’. The essay begins with discussions of what might be regarded as the two most influential functional models of conscience, the classical Christian account of conscience and the Freudian account of conscience. Then, using some insights from these models, and from some comparatively (...)
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  46. N. Maxwell (2012). Arguing for Wisdom in the University: An Intellectual Autobiography. Philosophia 40 (4):663-704.
    For forty years I have argued that we urgently need to bring about a revolution in academia so that the basic task becomes to seek and promote wisdom. How did I come to argue for such a preposterously gigantic intellectual revolution? It goes back to my childhood. From an early age, I desired passionately to understand the physical universe. Then, around adolescence, my passion became to understand the heart and soul of people via the novel. But I never discovered how (...)
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  47. Nicholas Maxwell, Text of TEDxUCL Talk: The Urgent Need for an Academic Revolution.
    We urgently need to bring about a revolution in academic inquiry so that the basic aim becomes, not just knowledge, but rather wisdom, construed to be the capacity and active endeavour to realize what is of value in life for oneself and others, wisdom thus including knowledge and technological know-how, but much else besides. A basic task of academia ought to be to help humanity learn how to make progress towards as good a world as possible.
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  48. Nicholas Maxwell (forthcoming). Can Scientific Method Help Us Create a Wiser World? In N. Dalal, A. Intezari & M. Heitz (eds.), Practical Wisdom in the Age of Technology: Insights, Issues and Questions for a New Millennium. Ashgate.
    Two great problems of learning confront humanity: (1) learning about the universe, and about ourselves as a part of the universe, and (2) learning how to make progress towards as good a world as possible. We solved the first problem when we created modern science in the 17th century, but we have not yet solved the second problem. This puts us in a situation of unprecedented danger. Modern science and technology enormously increase our power to act, but not our power (...)
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  49. Nicholas Maxwell (2014). What Philosophy Ought to Be. In Charles Tandy (ed.), Death And Anti-Death, Volume 11: Ten Years After Donald Davidson (1917-2003). Ria University Press. 125-162.
    The proper task of philosophy is to keep alive awareness of what our most fundamental, important, urgent problems are, what our best attempts are at solving them and, if possible, what needs to be done to improve these attempts. Unfortunately, academic philosophy fails disastrously even to conceive of the task in these terms. It makes no attempt to ensure that universities tackle global problems - global intellectually, and global in the sense of concerning the future of the earth and humanity. (...)
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  50. Nicholas Maxwell (2014). How Universities Can Help Create a Wiser World: The Urgent Need for an Academic Revolution. Imprint Academic.
    In order to make progress towards a better world we need to learn how to do it. And for that we need institutions of learning rationally designed and devoted to helping us solve our global problems, make progress towards a better world. It is just this that we lack at present. Our universities pursue knowledge. They are neither designed nor devoted to helping humanity learn how to tackle global problems — problems of living — in more intelligent, humane and effective (...)
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