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  1. James Behuniak Jr (2005). "Symbolic Reference" and Prognostication in the Yijing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (2):223–237.
  2. Chappell Brown (1982). Inner Truth and the Origin of the Yarrow Stalk Oracle. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (2):197-210.
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  3. Jie-Wei Cheng (1995). Deconstruction, Yin-Yang, and Negative Theology. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (3):263-287.
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  4. Michael Loewe (2011). Dong Zhongshu, a "Confucian" Heritage and the Chun Qiu Fan Lu. Brill.
    The assumption that a system described as ‘Confucianism’ formulated by Dong Zhongshu became accepted as the norm during the Western Han dynasty (202 BCE – 9 CE) is challenged and his supposed authorship of the Chunqiu fanlu examined.
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  5. Lee Rainey (1992). The Concept of ch'I in the Thought of Wang Ch'ung. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 19 (3):263-284.
  6. Vital Y. A. Rubin (1982). The Concepts of Wu-Hsing and Yin-Yang. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (2):131-157.
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  7. Chung Ta (1976). Wang Ch'ung's Anti-Confucian Struggle. Contemporary Chinese Thought 7 (4):57-68.
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  8. Robin Wang (2012). Yinyang: The Way of Heaven and Earth in Chinese Thought and Culture. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction; 2. Yinyang cosmology; 3. Yinyang matrix; 4. Yinyang strategy; 5. Yinyang body; 6. Yinyang symbol.
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  9. Robin D. S. Yates (ed.) (1997). Five Lost Classics: Tao, Huanglao, and Yin-Yang in Han China. Ballantine Books.
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  10. John Zijiang Ding (2009). Indian Yoni-Linga and Chinese Yin-Yang. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 4 (8):20-26.
    Indian philosophy of Yoni-Linga may be examined as a parallel to the Chinese philosophy of “Yin-Yang.” This essay will compare the similarities and distinctions between the two kinds of dichotomies through a theoretical formulation: certain conceptual, analytical and cross-cultural perspectives. The study will be focused on semiologieal, aesthetical, ontological and theological comparisons between these two of the most famous pairs of conceptual antonyms which have been developed by later Sino-Hindu philosophies and theologies as human worldviews widened and deepened with Eastern (...)
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Dong Zhongshu
  1. Robin Wang (2005). Dong Zhongshu's Transformation of "Yin-Yang" Theory and Contesting of Gender Identity. Philosophy East and West 55 (2):209 - 231.
    Dong Zhongshu (Tung Chung-shu) (179-104 B.C.E.) was the first prominent Confucian to integrate yin-yang theory into Confucianism. His constructive effort not only generates a new perspective on yin and yang, it also involves implications beyond its explicit contents. First, Dong changes the natural harmony (he ネᄆ) of yin and yang to an imposed unity (he 合). Second, he identifies yang with human nature (xing) and benevolence (ren), and yin with emotion (qing) and greed (tan). Taken together, these novelties grant a (...)
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  2. Robin Wang (2005). Dong Zhongshu's Transformation Of. Philosophy East and West 55 (2).
    : Dong Zhongshu (Tung Chung-shu) (179–104 B.C.E.) was the first prominent Confucian to integrate yin-yang theory into Confucianism. His constructive effort not only generates a new perspective on yin and yang, it also involves implications beyond its explicit contents. First, Dong changes the natural harmony of yin and yang to an imposed unity Second, he identifies yang with human nature (xing) and benevolence (ren), and yin with emotion (qing) and greed (tan). Taken together, these two novelties grant a philosophical basis (...)
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