This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
35 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Barry Allen (2010). A Dao of Technology? Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):151-160.
    Scholars have detected hostility to technology in Daoist thought. But is this a problem with any machine or only some applications of some machines by some people? I show that the problem is not with machines per se but with the people who introduce them, or more exactly with their knowledge. It is not knowledge as such that causes the disorder Laozi and Zhuangzi associate with machines; it is confused, disordered knowledge—superficial, inadequate, unsubtle, and artless. In other words the problem (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Robert E. Allinson (2003). On Chuang Tzu as a Deconstructionist with a Difference. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (3-4):487-500.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Robert E. Allinson (1989). On the Question of Relativism in the Chuang-Tzu. Philosophy East and West 39 (1):13-26.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Robert E. Allinson (1988). A Logical Reconstruction of the Butterfly Dream: The Case for Internal Textual Transformation. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (3):319-339.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Robert E. Allinson (1986). Having Your Cake and Eating It, Too: Evaluation and Trans-Evaluation in Chuang Tzu and Nietzsche. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 13 (4):429-443.
  6. Robert Elliot Allinson (2011). The Butterfly, the Mole and the Sage. Asian Philosophy 19 (3):213-223.
    Zhuangzi chooses a butterfly as a metaphor for transformation, a sighted creature whose inherent nature contains, and symbolizes, the potential for transformation from a less valued state to a more valued state. If transformation is not to be valued; if, according to a recent article by Jung Lee, 'there is no implication that it is either possible or desirable for the living to awake from their dream', why not tell a story of a mole awakening from a dream? This would (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Donald N. Blakeley (2008). Hearts in Agreement: Zhuangzi on Dao Adept Friendship. Philosophy East and West 58 (3):pp. 318-336.
    This essay examines two stories in Zhuangzi chapter 6 that provide detailsabout the formal, substantive, and applied features of friendship between daoadepts. Using a template of seven characteristics, dao adept friendship is thencompared with ren adept friendship, described in the Analects and theMencius. It is argued that dao living contains features of friendship that arecomparably robust. As unconventional as dao adept living may be, friendshipis not lacking but integral to such a life.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. David Chai (2014). Meontological Generativity: A Daoist Reading of the Thing. Philosophy East and West 64 (2):303-318.
  9. David Chai (2014). Nothingness and the Clearing: Heidegger, Daoism and the Quest for Primal Clarity. Review of Metaphysics 67 (3): 583 - 601.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Kim Chong Chong (2006). Zhuangzi and the Nature of Metaphor. Philosophy East and West 56 (3):370-391.
    : While it is well known that Zhuangzi uses metaphor extensively, there is much less appreciation of the role that it plays in his thought—a topic that is investigated in this essay. At the same time, this investigation is closely concerned with questions about the nature of metaphor. Comparisons are made between a central metaphorical structure in the Zhuangzi on the one hand and contemporary views of the nature of metaphor by Donald Davidson and by Lakoff and Johnson on the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Tim Connolly (2011). Perspectivism as a Way of Knowing in the Zhuangzi. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):487-505.
    A perspectivist theory is usually taken to mean that (1) our knowledge of the world is inevitably shaped by our particular perspectives, (2) any one of these perspectives is as good as any other, and (3) any claims to objective or authoritative knowledge are consequently without ground. Recent scholarship on Nietzsche, however, has challenged the prevalent view that the philosopher holds (2) and (3), arguing instead that his perspectivism aims at attaining a greater level of objectivity. In this essay, I (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Scott Cook (1997). Zhuang Zi and His Carving of the Confucian Ox. Philosophy East and West 47 (4):521-553.
    Zhuang Zi's relation to the Confucian school is reexamined. It is argued that although Zhuang Zi was fond of highlighting the absurdities of the Confucian enterprise, we can nonetheless detect in his writings a great admiration for much of what constituted the central core of the Confucian vision. This essay analyzes Confucius' image of "musical perfection," representing the total concordance of ritual restraints and harmonious freedom; traces the Confucian notion of self-cultivation through Mencius' passage on the "full-flowing energy"; and concludes (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Alan Fox (1996). Reflex and Reflectivity:Wuweiin theZhuangzi. Asian Philosophy 6 (1):59-72.
    Abstract I will explicate Zhuangzi's conception of wuwei as it is articulated in the image of the ?hinge of dao.? First, I will discuss the few actual instances of the term ?wuwei? in the Zhuangzi. Second, I will show that the text uses this imagery to suggest an adaptive or reflective mode of conduct. Third, I will analyse the metaphor of the hinge, and show how this metaphor can illuminate Zhuangzi's notion of wuwei and the behaviour of the realised person. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Chris Fraser (2012). The Limitations of Ritual Propriety: Ritual and Language in Xúnzǐ and Zhuāngzǐ. [REVIEW] Sophia 51 (2):257-282.
    This essay examines the theory of ritual propriety presented in the Xúnzǐ and criticisms of Xunzi-like views found in the classical Daoist anthology Zhuāngzǐ. To highlight the respects in which the Zhuāngzǐ can be read as posing a critical response to a Xunzian view of ritual propriety, the essay juxtaposes the two texts' views of language, since Xunzi's theory of ritual propriety is intertwined with his theory of language. I argue that a Zhuangist critique of the presuppositions of Xunzi's stance (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Chris Fraser (2011). Emotion and Agency in Zhuāngz. Asian Philosophy 21 (1):97-121.
    Among the many striking features of the philosophy of the Zhu?ngz? is that it advocates a life unperturbed by emotions, including even pleasurable, positive emotions such as joy or delight. Many of us see emotions as an ineluctable part of life, and some would argue they are a crucial component of a well-developed moral sensitivity and a good life. The Zhuangist approach to emotion challenges such commonsense views so radically that it amounts to a test case for the fundamental plausibility (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Chris Fraser (2009). Skepticism and Value in the Zhuāngzi. International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (4):439-457.
    The ethics of the Zhuāngzi is distinctive for its valorization of psychological qualities such as open-mindedness, adaptability, and tolerance. The paper discusses how these qualities and their consequences for morality and politics relate to the text’s views onskepticism and value. Chad Hansen has argued that Zhuangist ethical views are motivated by skepticism about our ability to know a privileged scheme of action-guiding distinctions, which in turn is grounded in a form of relativism about such distinctions. Against this, Icontend that the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Chris Fraser (2008). Psychological Emptiness in theZhuāngzǐ. Asian Philosophy 18 (2):123-147.
    Three views of psychological emptiness, or x?, can be found in the Zhu?ngz?. The instrumental view values x? primarily as a means of efficacious action. The moderate view assigns it intrinsic value as an element of one Zhuangist vision of the good life. The radical view also takes it to be an element of the ideal life, but in this case the form of life advocated is that of the Daoist sage, who transcends mundane human concerns to merge with nature (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Chris Fraser (2006). Zhuangzi, Xunzi, and the Paradoxical Nature of Education. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (4):529–542.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Albert Galvany (2009). Distorting the Rule of Seriousness: Laughter, Death, and Friendship in the Zhuangzi. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (1):49-59.
    The main purpose of this article is to underline the crucial significance of laughter, a hitherto neglected matter in the study of the Zhuangzi. It aims to show that focusing on laughter is beneficial in order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of some of the most philosophically relevant problems in the Zhuangzi since a careful analysis of the role of laughter may reveal a great deal of debate concerning such issues as life, death, friendship, social relations, and ritual in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Irving Goh (2011). Chuang Tzu's Becoming-Animal. Philosophy East and West 61 (1):110-133.
    Hui Tzu said to Chuang Tzu, “. . .Your words ... are too big and useless, and so everyone alike spurns them!”Chuang Tzu said, “Maybe you’ve never seen a wildcat or a weasel. It crouches down and hides, watching for something to come along. It leaps and races east and west, not hesitating to go high or low—until it falls into the trap and dies in the net. Then again there’s the yak, big as a cloud covering the sky. It (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Daniel M. Johnson (2012). Social Morality and Social Misfits: Confucius, Hegel, and the Attack of Zhuangzi and Kierkegaard. Asian Philosophy 22 (4):365-374.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Ronnie Littlejohn (2010). “Kongzi in the Zhuangzi&Quot;. In Victor Mair (ed.), Experimental Essays on Zhuangzi.
    Experimental Essays on Zhuangzi is a classic in the field. Originally published in 1983, this edition makes it available again in an expanded version, with four additional contributions, and in an updated format, with pinyin transcription, Chinese characters embedded in the text, and reference-style notes. The work is a well-respected textbook and essential reader in Daoist thought. It continues to constitute an essential contribution to the study of Daoism and Chinese philosophy. Show More Show Less .
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Eske Møllgaard (2005). Zhuangzi's Notion of Transcendental Life. Asian Philosophy 15 (1):1 – 18.
    In the post-metaphysical climate of the modern Western academy, Chinese thought is often seen as a happy pragmatism free from transcendental pretense. The article shows, on the contrary, that the early Daoist thinker Zhuangzi had not only one but at least two distinct notions of transcendence. The focus is on Zhuangzi's notion of transcendental life, or the life of Heaven as opposed to the life of man. Based on the explication of Zhuangzi's notion of transcendental life, the article provides a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Franklin Perkins (2011). Wandering Beyond Tragedy with Zhuangzi. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 3 (1):79-98.
    One could define a “tragic” viewpoint in many ways, but its core is the claim that things in this world do not always work out for the best. Probably the greatest tragic figure in the Zhuangzi is the defiant praying mantis, who waves her arms to fend off the oncoming chariot. This praying mantis is surely a symbol of Confucius, who was said in the Lun Yu to know that what he does is impossible but to do it anyway. In (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Hagop Sarkissian (2010). The Darker Side of Daoist Primitivism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):312-329.
    The Primitivist (responsible for chapters 8-11 of the heterogeneous Zhuangzi) has largely been interpreted as just another exponent of the philosophy of the Laozi or Daodejing. This is a shame, because the Primitivist is an idiosyncratic thinker whose theories do not simply reiterate those found in the Laozi. In this essay, I argue that even though the Primitivist embraced some of the values of the Laozi’s brand of Daoism, (e.g. simplicity, harmony with nature, being rid of knowledge, etc.) he would (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Cosma Shalizi, Chuang Tzu (or Zhuangzi).
    "Chuang Tzu" means "Master Chuang". If we are to believe traditional accounts (like those in the Records of the Historian , by Ssu-ma Ch'ian), he lived in the fourth century BC, contemporary with Plato and Aristotle. He was from a place called Meng, probably in the state of Sung, where he was "an official in the lacquer garden"; nobody knows what that means. Chuang Chou is also recorded as being a member of the Chi-Hsia academy maintained by the larger and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Deborah A. Sommer (2010). Concepts of the Body in the Zhuangzi. In Victor Mair (ed.), Experimental Essays on Zhuangzi, 2d ed. Three Pines Press. 212-228.
    The Zhuangzi is one of the richest early Chinese sources for exploring conceptualizations of the visceral human form. Zhuangzi presents the human frame as a corpus of flesh, organs, limbs, and bone; he dissects it before the reader's eyes, turning it inside out and joyfully displaying its fragmented joints, sundered limbs, and beautifully monstrous mutations. This body is a site of immolation and fragmentation that ultimately evokes a larger wholeness and completeness. Drawing and quartering the body, Zhuangzi paradoxically frees it (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Na Wei & Huang Deyuan (2008). Vesper Bells and Penumbra Awaiting Shadow: Heidegger and Zhuangzi's Hermeneutics of Words. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (1):151 - 161.
    In Heidegger's thinking, a language is neither words nor expressions. The discussion of a language brings not the language itself but rather us into its essence, and makes us gather unto "the genesis of the very language itself." With snows and vesper bells, Heidegger summoned both heaven and earth and gods and men, making them merge into a single world. Likewise, Zhuangzi used the words of Qixie to summon the fleeting clouds in an endless sky and a dusky earth populated (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Keqian Xu (2011). A Different Type of Individualism in Zhuangzi. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):445-462.
    Although being widely considered as only a Western tradition, individualism is not absent in traditional Chinese philosophy and culture. In some of the classic Chinese philosophic works such as Zhuangzi, we can clearly identify some elements which can be appropriately attributed to “individualism”, such as the awareness of individual “self” as an independent and unique existence, advocating individual freedom and liberty, emphasizing on the value and dignity of individual life, favoring individuals’ autonomy and privacy, pursuing unconstrained development in personality and (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Keqian Xu (2005). 《庄子哲学新探——道、言、自由与美》A New Research on Zhuang Zi's Philosophy:Tao, Language, Freedom and Aesthetics.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Keqian Xu (2002). 论庄子哲学中的“真”(The Concept " Zhen "in Zhuang Zi’s Philosophy). 南京大学学报(哲学.人文科学.社会科学版) , Journal of Nalnjing University(Philosophy, Humanities and Social Sciences).
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Keqian Xu (2000). 论作为道路与方法的庄子之“道”. 中国哲学史(The History of Chinese Philosophy) 2000 (4):66-72.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Keqian Xu (1999). “存在”、“此在”与“是非”——兼论庄子、海德格尔对人的存在问题观点之异同(“Sein”, “Dasein” and “Shi Fei”: Zhuang Zi and Heidgger’s Opinions on the Issue of Human Existence). 南京师大学报(Journal of Nanjing Normal University) 1999 (6):25-30.
    The thorny problem, which we are confronted with in translating the term of “Sein”(Being) from western Philosophy into Chinese, highlights the ambiguity, paradoxy and vagueness of the issue of Sein from a specific viewpoint. Although there is no exact equivalent in Chinese for the word of “Sein”, we use several different words to express the meanings consisted in the issue of “Sein”. By comparison we may find that what is discussed by Zhuang Zi using the terms of “Shi” and “Fei” (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Keqian Xu (1993). 梭罗与庄子的比较 (A Comparision between Henry David Thoreau and Zhuangzi). 中國文化月刊 (Chinese Culture Monthly) 169 (169):10-25.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Xiaomei Yang (2005). Great Dream and Great Awakening: Interpreting the Butterfly Dream Story. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (2):253-266.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation