Martin Lin Rutgers University
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  1. Martin Lin (forthcoming). The Principle of Sufficient Reason in Spinoza. In Michael Della Rocca (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Spinoza.
  2. Martin Lin (2013). Philosophy and Its History. In Stewart Duncan & Antonia LoLordo (eds.), Debates in Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses. Routledge. 363.
  3. Martin Lin (2012). Rationalism and Necessitarianism. Noûs 46 (3):418-448.
    Metaphysical rationalism, the doctrine which affirms the Principle of Sufficient Reason (the PSR), is out of favor today. The best argument against it is that it appears to lead to necessitarianism, the claim that all truths are necessarily true. Whatever the intuitive appeal of the PSR, the intuitive appeal of the claim that things could have been otherwise is greater. This problem did not go unnoticed by the great metaphysical rationalists Spinoza and Leibniz. Spinoza’s response was to embrace necessitarianism. Leibniz’s (...)
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  4. Martin Lin (2009). The Power of Reason in Spinoza. In Olli Koistinen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
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  5. Martin Lin (2007). Spinoza's Arguments for the Existence of God. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):269-297.
    It is often thought that, although <span class='Hi'>Spinoza</span> develops a bold and distinctive conception of God (the unique substance, or Natura Naturans, in which all else inheres and which possesses infinitely many attributes, including extension), the arguments that he offers which purport to prove God’s existence contribute nothing new to natural theology. Rather, he is seen as just another participant in the seventeenthcentury revival of the ontological argument initiated by Descartes and taken up by Malebranche and Leibniz among others. That (...)
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  6. Martin Lin (2007). Spinoza's Arguments for the Existence of God. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):269–297.
    It is often thought that, although Spinoza develops a bold and distinctive conception of God (the unique substance, or Natura Naturans, in which all else inheres and which possesses infinitely many attributes, including extension), the arguments that he offers which purport to prove God's existence contribute nothing new to natural theology. Rather, he is seen as just another participant in the seventeenth century revival of the ontological argument initiated by Descartes and taken up by Malebranche and Leibniz among others. That (...)
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  7. Martin Lin (2006). Substance, Attribute, and Mode in Spinoza. Philosophy Compass 1 (2):144–153.
  8. Martin Lin (2006). Spinoza's Account of Akrasia. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):395-414.
    : Perhaps the central problem which preoccupies Spinoza as a moral philosopher is the conflict between reason and passion. He belongs to a long tradition that sees the key to happiness and virtue as mastery and control by reason over the passions. This mastery, however, is hard won, as the passions often overwhelm its power and subvert its rule. When reason succumbs to passion, we act against our better judgment. Such action is often termed 'akratic'. Many commentators have complained that (...)
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  9. Martin Lin (2006). Teleology and Human Action in Spinoza. Philosophical Review 115 (3):317-354.
  10. Martin Lin (2005). Memory and Personal Identity in Spinoza. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (2):243 - 268.
  11. M. Lin (2004). Spinoza: Metaphysical Themes. Philosophical Review 113 (1):139-143.
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  12. Martin Lin (2004). Spinoza. Philosophical Review 113 (1):139-143.
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  13. Martin Lin (2004). Spinozas Metaphysics of Desire. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 86 (1):21-55.
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  14. Martin Lin (2004). Spinozas Metaphysics of Desire. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 86 (1):21-55.
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  15. Martin Lin (2002). Review of Nadler Steven, Spinoza's Heresy: Immortality and the Jewish Mind. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (12).
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  16. Yitzhak Melamed & Martin Lin, Principle of Sufficient Reason.
    The Principle of Sufficient Reason is a powerful and controversial philosophical principle stipulating that everything must have a reason or cause. This simple demand for thoroughgoing intelligibility yields some of the boldest and most challenging theses in the history of metaphysics and epistemology. In this entry we begin with explaining the Principle, and then turn to the history of the debates around it. A section on recent discussions of the Principle will be added in the near future.
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