John Perry University of California, Riverside, Stanford University
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  • Faculty, University of California, Riverside
  • Faculty, Stanford University
  • PhD, Cornell University, 1968.

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  1. Wesley H. Holliday & John Perry (forthcoming). Roles, Rigidity, and Quantification in Epistemic Logic. In Alexandru Baltag & Sonja Smets (eds.), Trends in Logic, Outstanding Contributions: Johan van Benthem on Logic and Information Dynamics. Springer.
    Epistemic modal predicate logic raises conceptual problems not faced in the case of alethic modal predicate logic: Frege’s “Hesperus-Phosphorus” problem—how to make sense of ascribing to agents ignorance of necessarily true identity statements—and the related “Hintikka-Kripke” problem—how to set up a logical system combining epistemic and alethic modalities, as well as others problems, such as Quine’s “Double Vision” problem and problems of self-knowledge. In this paper, we lay out a philosophical approach to epistemic predicate logic, implemented formally in Melvin Fitting’s (...)
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  2. Donald Kennedy, John Perry, John Perky, Carolyn Lougee, Marsh McCall & Paul Robinson (forthcoming). Statements Prepared for the Meeting of the Faculty Senate on 21 January 1988. Minerva.
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  3. J. Perry & P. Smith (forthcoming). Levels of Valuational Discourse in Education. Philosophy of Education.
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  4. John Perry (2014). Faith in the Public Square by Rowan Williams (London: Bloomsbury, 2012), Vi + 344 Pp. [REVIEW] Modern Theology 30 (1):181-183.
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  5. Jon C. Olson & John Perry (2012). Letters, Notes, & Comments. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):359 - 400.
    Revisionists and traditionalists appeal to Acts 15, welcoming the Gentiles, for analogies directing the church's response to homosexual persons. John Perry has analyzed the major positions. He faults revisionists for inadequate attention to the Jerusalem Decree and faults one traditionalist for using the Decree literally rather than through analogy. I argue that analogical use of the Decree must supplement rather than displace the plain sense. The Decree has been neglected due to assumptions that Paul opposed it, that it expired, or (...)
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  6. John Perry (2012). Return of the Zombies? In Hill Christopher & Gozzano Simone (eds.), New Perspectives on Type Identity: The Mental and the Physical. Cambridge University Press. 251.
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  7. John Perry (2012). Thought and Reality, by Michael Dummett. [REVIEW] Mind 121 (483):798-808.
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  8. John Perry (2012). Vocation and Creation: Beyond the Gentile-Homosexual Analogy. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):385-400.
    One strand of the church's conversation about homosexuality compares present-day acceptance of homosexuals to the church's acceptance of Gentiles in Acts 15. In a previous article, “Gentiles and Homosexuals,” I presented the history of that strand. In a reply to my article, Olson proposes to reimagine the analogy via the “radical new perspective on Paul” and argues that doing so exposes problems with my original analysis. I defend myself against these criticisms, while also entering into the spirit of Olson's reimagined (...)
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  9. John Perry, Michael Bratman & John Martin Fischer (eds.) (2012). Introduction to Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings, Sixth Edition, is the most comprehensive topically organized collection of classical and contemporary philosophy available. The sixth edition includes five new readings--by renowned contemporary philosophers Anthony Brueckner, John Martin Fischer, Alan Goldman, Rosalind Hursthouse, and Thomas Nagel--and additional descriptive material on the authors throughout the book.
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  10. J. Liu & J. Perry (eds.) (2011). Consciousness and the Self: New Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    'I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe any thing but the perception.' These famous words of David Hume, on his inability to perceive the self, set the stage for JeeLoo Liu and John Perry's collection of essays on self-awareness and self-knowledge. This volume connects recent scientific studies on consciousness with the traditional issues about the self explored by Descartes, Locke and Hume. Experts in the field offer contrasting perspectives on matters such as (...)
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  11. J. Perry (2011). May Alzheimer's Patients Refuse Tube Feeding? Yet More Questions on the Papal Allocution--And Perhaps an Answer. Christian Bioethics 17 (2):123-139.
    The implications of Pope John Paul II's 2004 Allocution on vegetative states remain unclear despite dozens of articles and a recent clarifying statement from the Vatican. Yet few have considered its implications for those with end-stage progressive dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease. Although recent studies suggest tube feeding is burdensome and not beneficial for such patients, the Allocution would nonetheless seem to forbid patients from forgoing it. But this seems to be in tension with the Catholic bioethical tradition as a (...)
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  12. John Perry (2011). On Knowing Your Self. In Shaun Gallagher (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Self. Oup Oxford.
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  13. John Perry (2011). Persons and Selves. Revue de Métaphysique Et de Morale 4 (4):455-473.
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  14. John Perry (2011). Textualism and the Discovery of Rights. In Andrei Marmor & Scott Soames (eds.), Philosophical Foundations of Language in the Law. Oxford University Press, Usa. 105--129.
     
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  15. John Perry (2011). The Pretenses of Loyalty: Locke, Liberal Theory, and American Political Theology. OUP USA.
    In the face of ongoing religious conflicts and unending culture wars, what are we to make of liberalism's promise that it alone can arbitrate between church and state? In this wide-ranging study, John Perry examines the roots of our thinking on religion and politics, placing the early-modern founders of liberalism in conversation with today's theologians and political philosophers. -/- From the story of Antigone to debates about homosexuality and bans on religious attire, it is clear that liberalism's promise to solve (...)
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  16. Kepa Korta & John Perry (2010). Intentions to Refer. In Erich Rast & Luiz Carlos Baptista (eds.), Meaning and Context. Peter Lang. 2--161.
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  17. Kepa Korta & John Perry (2010). What is Said? In François Recanati, Isidora Stojanovic & Neftali Villanueva (eds.), Context-Dependence, Perspective and Relativity. Mouton de Gruyter. 6--51.
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  18. J. Perry (2010). Two Questions for Wolterstorff: On the Roles Played by Rights-Talk in History and the Measuring of Worth. Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (2):147-155.
    Much of Nicholas Wolterstorff’s argument in Justice: Rights and Wrongs is persuasive and helpful, especially his focus on perceiving instances of injustice as wronging, i.e., the denial of the goods to which one has a right. Two aspects of his theory are less persuasive, one historical and one theoretical. Historically, although he convincingly shows that the concept of rights is much older than some claim, he does not account for how the function of rights-talk may have changed. Theoretically, his account (...)
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  19. John Perry (2010). Critical Study Velleman: Self to Self. Noûs 44 (4):740-758.
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  20. John Perry (2010). Gentiles and Homosexuals: A Brief History of an Analogy. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (2):321-347.
    This paper examines the argument that moral approval of homosexuality is analogous to the early church's inclusion of gentiles. The analogy has a long but often overlooked history, dating back to the start of the modern gay-rights movement. It has recently gained greater prominence because of its importance to the Episcopal Church's debate with the wider Anglican Communion. Beginning with the Episcopal Church argument, we see that there are five specific areas most in need of further clarification. In this essay (...)
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  21. John Perry (2010). Selves and Self-Concepts. In Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O'Rourke & Harry Silverstein (eds.), Time and Identity. Mit Press. 229.
     
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  22. John Perry (2010). Wretched Subterfuge: A Defense of the Compatibilism of Freedom and Natural Causation. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 84 (2):93-113.
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  23. J. Perry, S. Beyer & S. Holm (2009). Assistive Technology, Telecare and People with Intellectual Disabilities: Ethical Considerations. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (2):81-86.
    Increasingly, commissioners and providers of services for people with intellectual disabilities are turning to assistive technology and telecare as a potential solution to the problem of the increased demand for services, brought about by an expanding population of people with intellectual disabilities in the context of relatively static or diminishing resources. While there are numerous potential benefits of assistive technology and telecare, both for service providers and service users, there are also a number of ethical issues. The aim of this (...)
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  24. John Perry (2009). Diminished and Fractured Selves. In Debra J. H. Mathews, Hilary Bok & Peter V. Rabins (eds.), Personal Identity and Fractured Selves: Perspectives From Philosophy, Ethics, and Neuroscience. Johns Hopkins University Press.
     
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  25. John Perry (2009). Directing Intentions. In Joseph Almog & Paolo Leonardi (eds.), The Philosophy of David Kaplan. Oxford University Press. 187--201.
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  26. John Perry (2009). Hume and Frege on Identity. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 146 (3):413 - 423.
  27. John Perry (2009). Hintikka on Demonstratives. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 4:369-382.
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  28. John Perry (2009). Reference and Reflexivity. Center for the Study of Language and Information.
    Preface to the second edition -- Preface to the first edition -- Introduction -- Contents and propositions -- Utterance and context -- Context and cognitive paths -- Meanings and contents -- Names and the co-reference problem -- Names, networks, and notions -- The no-reference problem -- Pragmatics -- Unarticulated constituents -- Contents and attitudes -- Conclusion.
     
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  29. John Perry (2009). Subjectivity. In Brian McLaughlin, Ansgar Beckermann & Sven Walter (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mind. Oup Oxford.
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  30. John Perry, Michael Bratman & John Martin Fischer (2009). Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings, Fourth Edition, International Edition. Oup Usa.
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  31. David F. Austin, Jon Barwise & John Perry (2008). Suggested Further Reading. In Aloysius Martinich (ed.), The Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press. 78--468.
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  32. Kepa Korta & John Perry, Pragmatics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    These lines — also attributed to H. L. Mencken and Carl Jung — although perhaps politically incorrect, are surely correct in reminding us that more is involved in what one communicates than what one literally says; more is involved in what one means than the standard, conventional meaning of the words one uses. The words ‘yes,’ ‘perhaps,’ and ‘no’ each has a perfectly identifiable meaning, known by every speaker of English (including not very competent ones). However, as those lines illustrate, (...)
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  33. Kepa Korta & John Perry (2008). The Pragmatic Circle. Synthese 165 (3):347 - 357.
    Classical Gricean pragmatics is usually conceived as dealing with far-side pragmatics, aimed at computing implicatures. It involves reasoning about why what was said, was said. Near-side pragmatics, on the other hand, is pragmatics in the service of determining, together with the semantical properties of the words used, what was said. But this raises the specter of ‘the pragmatic circle.’ If Gricean pragmatics seeks explanations for why someone said what they did, how can there be Gricean pragmatics on the near-side? Gricean (...)
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  34. Krista Lawlor & John Perry (2008). Moore's Paradox. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (3):421 – 427.
    G. E. Moore famously noted that saying 'I went to the movies, but I don't believe it' is absurd, while saying 'I went to the movies, but he doesn't believe it' is not in the least absurd. The problem is to explain this fact without supposing that the semantic contribution of 'believes' changes across first-person and third-person uses, and without making the absurdity out to be merely pragmatic. We offer a new solution to the paradox. Our solution is that the (...)
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  35. John Perry (2008). Can't We All Just Be Compatibilists?: A Critical Study of John Martin Fischer's My Way. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 12 (2):157 - 166.
    My aim in this study is not to praise Fischer's fine theory of moral responsibility, but to (try to) bury the "semi" in "semicompatibilism". I think Fischer gives the Consequence Argument (CA) too much credit, and gives himself too little credit. In his book, The Metaphysics of Free Will, Fischer gave the CA as good a statement as it will ever get, and put his finger on what is wrong with it. Then he declared stalemate rather than victory. In my (...)
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  36. Kepa Korta & John Perry (2007). How to Say Things with Words. In Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.), John Searle's Philosophy of Language: Force, Meaning, and Mind. Cambridge University Press.
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  37. Kepa Korta & John Perry (2007). Radical Minimalism, Moderate Contextualism. In G. Preyer (ed.), Context Sensitivity and Semantic Minimalism. Oxford University Press. 94--111.
  38. John Perry (2007). `Borges and I' and `I'. Amherst Lecture in Philosophy 2:1-16.
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  39. John Perry (2007). Situating Semantics: A Response. In Michael O'Rourke Corey Washington (ed.), Situating Semantics: Essays on the Philosophy of John Perry. 507--575.
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  40. John Perry, Michael Bratman & John Martin Fischer (eds.) (2007). Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction to Philosophy, Fourth Edition, is the most comprehensive topically organized collection of classical and contemporary philosophy available. Building on the exceptionally successful tradition of previous editions, this edition for the first time incorporates the insights of a new coeditor, John Martin Fischer, and has been updated and revised to make it more accessible. Ideal for introductory philosophy courses, the text includes sections on the meaning of life, God and evil, knowledge and reality, the philosophy of science, the mind/body problem, (...)
     
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  41. Kepa Korta & John Perry (2006). Three Demonstrations and a Funeral. Mind and Language 21 (2):166–186.
    Gricean pragmatics seems to pose a dilemma. If semantics is limited to the conventional meanings of types of expressions, then the semantics of an utterance does not determine what is said. If all that figures in the determination of what is said counts as semantics, then pragmatic reasoning about the specific intentions of a speaker intrudes on semantics. The dilemma is false. Key points: Semantics need not determine what is said, and the description, with which the hearer begins, need not (...)
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  42. Kepa Korta & John Perry (2006). Varieties of Minimalist Semantics. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (2):451–459.
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  43. John Perry (2006). Re-Seducing Saint Howard. Philosophical Books 47 (1):34-39.
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  44. John Perry (2006). Mary and Max and Jack and Ned. In Dean W. Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics, Volume 2. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 79.
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  45. John Perry (2006). Stalnaker and Indexical Belief. In Judith Jarvis Thomson & Alex Byrne (eds.), Content and Modality: Themes From the Philosophy of Robert Stalnaker. Oxford University Press. 204--221.
     
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  46. John Perry (2006). Using Indexicals. In Michael Devitt & Richard Hanley (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Language. Blackwell. 314--334.
    In this essay I examine how we use indexicals. The key function of indexicals, I claim, is to help the audience --- that is the hearers or readers of the utterance with whom the speaker intends to be communicating---to find supplementary channels of information about the object to which the indexical refers. To keep the discussion manageable, I will oversimplify the epistemology of conversation. I ignore the fact that people sometimes lie and sometimes make mistakes. I talk freely about what (...)
     
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  47. John Perry (2006). What's to Be Done? Topoi 25 (1-2):83-84.
    All of culture, philosophy included, is a huge trick on nature, and nature will eventually catch on and reassert itself. But for right now, if one lives in a free society, it's a wonderful time to be a philosopher: so much to read, so much to think and write about.
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  48. J. Perry & C. Bianchi (2004). Recensioni/Reviews-Reference and Reflexivity. Epistemologia 27 (2):340-341.
     
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  49. John Perry (2004). Précis of "Knowledge, Possibility and Consciousness". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (1):172 - 181.
  50. John Perry (2004). Compatibilist Options. In David Shier, Michael O'Rourke & Joseph Keim Campbell (eds.), Freedom and Determinism. MIT Press/Bradford Book. 231.
    Compatibilism is the thesis that an act may be both free and determined by previous events and the laws of nature. I assume that in normal cases a condition of a person's performing an act freely is that the person is able to refrain from performing the act. Thus, I accept that if determinism entails that agents do not have this ability, we must give up compatibilism. In this paper I try to contribute to the rethinking of compatibilism by distinguishing (...)
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  51. John Perry (2004). Compatibilist Options. In M. O.’Rourke J. K. Campbell (ed.), Freedom and Determinism. MIT. 231.
    …those who accept that responsibility for a situation implies an ability to bring it about and, perhaps, an ability to prevent it, must explain how agents are able to do other than they are caused to do. Without it, they can give no defense of their counterexamples. With it, they can be confident that.
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  52. John Perry (2004). Pr. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (1):172-181.
  53. John Perry (2004). Replies. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (1):207-229.
  54. John Perry (2004). Review: Précis of "Knowledge, Possibility and Consciousness". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (1):172 - 181.
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  55. John Perry (2004). Review: Replies. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (1):207 - 229.
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  56. John Perry (2003). Daniel Cohnitz Personal Identity and the Methodology of Imaginary Cases1. In K. Petrus (ed.), On Human Persons. Heusenstamm Nr Frankfurt: Ontos Verlag. 1--145.
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  57. John Perry (2003). Predelli's Threatening Note: Contexts, Utterances, and Tokens in the Philosophy of Language. Journal of Pragmatics 35:373--387.
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  58. John Perry (2001). Knowledge, Possibility, and Consciousness. MIT Press.
    A defense of antecedent physicalism, which argues against the idea that if everything that goes on in the universe is physical, our consciousness and feelings ...
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  59. John Perry (2001). Time, Consciousness and the Knowledge Argument. In The Importance of Time: Proceedings of the Philosophy of Time Society, 1995-2000. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Pub.
  60. John Perry (2001). The Importance of Time: Proceedings of the Philosophy of Time Society, 1995-2000. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Pub.
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  61. John Perry (2001). The Modal Argument. In Knowledge, Possibility, and Consciousness. MIT Press.
     
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  62. John Perry (2001). The Zombie Argument. In Knowledge, Possibility, and Consciousness. MIT Press.
     
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  63. John Perry (1998). Broadening the Mind. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (1):223-231.
    The main topic of Jerry Fodor’s The Elm and the Expert,1, and the title of the first chapter, is “If Psychological processes are computational, how can psychological laws be intentional?” I focus on the first and second chapters; The first is devoted to setting up the question, the second to answering it.
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  64. John Perry (1998). Broadening the Mind. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (1):223 - 231.
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  65. John Perry (1998). Indexicals, Contexts and Unarticulated Constituents. In Proceedings of the 1995 CSLI-Armsterdam Logic, Language and Computation Conference. CSLI Publications.
    Philosophers and logicians use the term “indexical” for words such as “I”, “you” and “tomorrow”. Demonstratives such as “this” and “that” and demonstratives phrases such as “this man” and “that computer” are usually reckoned as a subcategory of indexicals. (Following [Kaplan, 1989a].) The “context-dependence” of indexicals is often taken as a defining feature: what an indexical designates shifts from context to context. But there are many kinds of shiftiness, with corresponding conceptions of context. Until we clarify what we mean by (...)
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  66. John Perry (1998). Myself and "I". In Marcelo Stamm (ed.), Philosophie in Synthetischer Absicht. 83–103.
    In this essay I distinguish three kinds of self-knowledge. I call these three kinds agent-relative knowledge, self-attached knowledge and knowledge of the person one happens to be. These aspects of self-knowledge differ in how the knower or agent is represented. Most of what I say will be applicable to beliefs as well as knowledge, and to other kinds of attitudes and thoughts, such as desire, as well.1 Agent-relative knowledge is knowledge from the perspective of a particular agent. To have this (...)
     
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  67. John Perry (1998). Proceedings of the 1995 CSLI-Armsterdam Logic, Language and Computation Conference. CSLI Publications.
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  68. John Perry (1998). The Self Self-Knowledge. Philosophy:1-6.
    Review Jopling's discussion is carried on with remarkable clarity. His presentation of the diverse philosophical positions is balanced and fair. . . . Self-Knowledge and the Self is a work of excellent, sound scholarship, a most significant contribution. Hazel Barnes, author of Sartre and Flaubert Jopling's book is the most sustained and serious contemporary philosophical reflection on the Delphic injunction Know thyself of which I am aware. Drawing on literature and psychotherapy as well as solid argumentation, it gently but persuasively (...)
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  69. John Perry (1997). Indexicals and Demonstratives. In Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Blackwell. 486--612.
    When you use the word “I” it designates you; when I use the same word, it designates me. If you use “you” talking to me, it designates me; when I use it talking to you, it designates you. “I” and “you” are indexicals. The designation of an indexical shifts from speaker to speaker, time to time, place to place. Different utterances of the same indexical designate different things, because what is designated depends not only on the meaning associated with the (...)
     
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  70. John Perry (1997). Reflexivity, Indexicality and Names. In W. Künne, A. Newen & M. Anduschus (eds.), Direct Reference, Indexicality and Propositional Attitudes. Csli. 3--19.
    It has been persuasively argued by David Kaplan and others that the proposition expressed by statements like (1) is a singular proposition, true in just those worlds in which a certain person, David Israel, is a computer scientist. Call this proposition P . The truth of this proposition does not require that the utterance (1) occur, or even that Israel has ever said anything at all. Marcus, Donnellan, Kripke and others have persuasively argued for a view of proper names that, (...)
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  71. David Israel & John Perry (1996). Where Monsters Dwell. In Jerry Seligman & Dag Westerståhl (eds.), Logic, Language and Computation. Csli Publications, Stanford. 1--303.
    Kaplan says that monsters violate Principle 2 of his theory. Principle 2 is that indexicals, pure and demonstrative alike, are directly referential. In providing this explanation of there being no monsters, Kaplan feels his theory has an advantage over double-indexing theories like Kamp’s or Segerberg’s (or Stalnaker’s), which either embrace monsters or avoid them only by ad hoc stipulation, in the sharp conceptual distinction it draws between circumstances of evaluation and contexts of utterance. We shall argue that Kaplan’s prohibition is (...)
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  72. John Perry (1996). Evading the Slingshot. In J. Ezquerro A. Clark (ed.), Philosophy and Cognitive Science: Categories, Consciousness, and Reasoning. Kluwer.
    The topic of this essay is “the slingshot,” a short argument that purports to show that sentences1 designate (stand for, refer to) truth values. Versions of this argument have been used by Frege 2, Church 3, Quine4 and Davidson5; thus it is historically important, even if it immediately strikes one as fishy. The argument turns on two principles, which I call substitution and redistribution. In “Semantic Innocence and Uncompromising Situations,”6 Jon Barwise and I rejected both principles, as part of our (...)
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  73. John Perry (1996). Indexicals. In Edwards (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Philosophy Supplement. Simon and Schuster Macmillan. 257--258.
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  74. John Perry (1996). Rip Van Winkle and Other Characters. European Review of Philosophy 2:13-39.
    In this essay I first review Kaplan’s theory of linguistic character, and then explain and motivate a concept of doxastic character. I then develop some concepts for dealing with the topic of belief retention and then, finally, discuss Rip Van Winkle. I come down on Kaplan’s side with respect to the Frege-inspired strategy, narrowly construed. But I advocate something like the Frege-inspired strategy, if it is construed more broadly. On my view it is remarkably easy to retain a belief, and (...)
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  75. John Perry (1996). The Self. In Edward Craig (ed.), Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Routledge.
    The English expression “self” is a modest one; in its normal use, it is not even quite a word, but something that makes an ordinary object pronoun into a reflexive one: “her” into “herself,” “him” into “himself” and “it” into “itself”. The reflexive pronoun is used when the object of an action or attitude is the same as the subject of that action or attitude. If I say Mark Twain shot _himself _in the foot, I describe Mark Twain not only (...)
     
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  76. John Perry & David Israel (1996). Logic, Language and Computation.
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  77. John Perry & Elizabeth Macken (1996). Interfacing Situations. In Jerry Seligman & Dag Westerståhl (eds.), Logic, Language and Computation. Csli Publications, Stanford. 1--443.
  78. J. Perry (1995). Frege über indexikalische Ausdrücke. Conceptus 28 (73):147-183.
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  79. John Perry (1994). Davidson's Sentences and Wittgenstein's Builders. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 68 (2):23 - 37.
    Words stand for things of various kinds and for various kinds of things. Because words do this, the sentences made up of words mean what they do, and are capable of expressing our thoughts, our beliefs and conjectures, desires and wishes. This simple idea seems right to me, but it flies in the face of formidable authority. In a famous passage in “Reality without Reference,” Donald Davidson criticizes what he calls the “building-block theory:”.
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  80. John Perry (1994). Fodor and Lepore on Holism. Philosophical Studies 73 (2-3):123-58.
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  81. John Perry (1994). Intentionality and its Puzzles. In Samuel D. Guttenplan (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell.
    Intentionality is a term for a feature exhibited by many mental states and activities: being directed at objects. Two related things are meant by this. First, when one desires or believes or hopes, one always believes or desires or hopes something. Let’s assume that belief report 1) is true.
     
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  82. David Israel, John Perry & Syun Tutiya (1993). Executions, Motivations, and Accomplishments. Philosophical Review 102 (4):515-540.
    Brutus wanted to kill Caesar. He believed that Caesar was an ordinary mortal, and that, given this, stabbing him (by which we mean plunging a knife into his heart) was a way of killing him. He thought that he could stab Caesar, for he remembered that he had a knife and saw that Caesar was standing next to him on his left, in the Forum. So Brutus was motivated to stab the man to his left. He did so, thereby killing (...)
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  83. John Perry (1993). Executions, Motivations, and Accomplishments. Philosophical Review 102 (4):515 - 540.
    Brutus wanted to kill Caesar. He believed that Caesar was an ordinary mortal, and that, given this, stabbing him (by which we mean plunging a knife into his heart) was a way of killing him. He thought that he could stab Caesar, for he remembered that he had a knife and saw that Caesar was standing next to him on his left, in the Forum. So Brutus was motivated to stab the man to his left. He did so, thereby killing (...)
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  84. John Perry (1993). The Problem of the Essential Indexical: And Other Essays. Oxford University Press.
    A collection of twelve essays by John Perry and two essays he co-authored, this book deals with various problems related to "self-locating beliefs": the sorts of beliefs one expresses with indexicals and demonstratives, like "I" and "this." Postscripts have been added to a number of the essays discussing criticisms by authors such as Gareth Evans and Robert Stalnaker. Included with such well-known essays as "Frege on Demonstratives," "The Problem of the Essential Indexical," "From Worlds to Situations," and "The Prince and (...)
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  85. John Perry & David J. Israel (1991). Fodor and Psychological Explanation. In Barry M. Loewer & Georges Rey (eds.), Meaning in Mind: Fodor and His Critics. Blackwell.
    [In Meaning in Mind, edited by Barry Loewer and Georges Rey. Oxford: Basil Black- well, 1991, 165.
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  86. Robin Cooper, Kuniaki Mukai & John Perry (eds.) (1990). Situation Theory and its Applications Vol. Csli.
    Preface This volume represents the proceedings of the First Conference on Situation Theory and Its Applications held by CSLI at Asilomar, California, ...
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  87. David J. Israel & John Perry (1990). What is Information? In Philip P. Hanson (ed.), Information, Language and Cognition. University of British Columbia Press.
  88. Joseph Almog, John Perry, Howard K. Wettstein & David Kaplan (eds.) (1989). Themes From Kaplan. Oxford University Press, USA.
    This anthology of essays on the work of David Kaplan, a leading contemporary philosopher of language, sprang from a conference, "Themes from Kaplan," organized by the Center for the Study of Language and Information at Stanford University.
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  89. Mark Crimmins & John Perry (1989). The Prince and the Phone Booth: Reporting Puzzling Beliefs. Journal of Philosophy 86 (12):685 - 711.
  90. John Perry, J. Almog & Howard K. Wettstein (eds.) (1989). Themes From Kaplan. Oxford University Press.
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  91. John Perry (1988). A Review of John Macnamara's a Border Dispute. [REVIEW] Cognition 30 (2):183-188.
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  92. John Perry (1988). Cognitive Significance and New Theories of Reference. Noûs 22 (1):1-18.
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  93. John Perry (1988). Symposium Papers, Comments, and an Abstract: Cognitive Significance and New Theories of Reference. Noûs 22 (1):1-18.
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  94. John Perry (1986). Circumstantial Attitudes and Benevolent Cognition. In Jeremy Butterfield (ed.), Language, Mind and Logic. Cambridge University Press.
    From: _Language, Mind and Logic_, edited by Jeremy Butter?eld. 123.
     
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  95. John Perry (1986). From Worlds to Situations. Journal of Philosophical Logic 15 (1):83 - 107.
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  96. John Perry (1986). Thought Without Representation. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 137:137-152.
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  97. Jon Barwise & John Perry (1985). Shifting Situations and Shaken Attitudes. Linguistics and Philosophy 8 (1):105--161.
  98. Jon Barwise & John Perry (1983). Situations and Attitudes. Mit Press.
  99. John Perry (1983). Contemporary Philosophy: A New Survey. The Hague: Nijhoff.
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  100. John Perry (1983). Personal Identity and the Concept of a Person. In Contemporary Philosophy: A New Survey. The Hague: Nijhoff.
     
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  101. Jon Barwise & John Perry (1981). Situations and Attitudes. Journal of Philosophy 78 (11):668-691.
  102. Jon Barwise & John Perry (1981). Semantic Innocence and Uncompromising Situations. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 6 (1):387-404.
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  103. John Perry (1980). Belief and Acceptance. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 5 (1):533-542.
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  104. J. Perry (1979). The Essential Indexical. Noûs 13:3--21.
     
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  105. John Perry (1979). ``A Knowledge by Acquaintance and Knowledge by Description&Quot. Noûs 13:3-21.
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  106. John Perry (1979). The Problem of the Essential Indexical. Noûs 13 (December):3-21.
  107. John Perry (1979). ``The Problem of the Essential Idexical&Quot. Noûs 13:3-21.
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  108. John Perry (1978). A Dialogue on Personal Identity and Immortality. Hackett.
    A DIALOGUE on PERSONAL IDENTITY and IMMORTALITY This is a record of conversations of Gretchen We/rob, a teacher of philosophy at a small mid- western ...
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  109. John Perry (1978). Relative Identity and Number. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):1 - 14.
    I argue for the consistency of frege's treatments of identity and number. Specifically, I argue that geach is wrong in suggesting that frege's insights about number should have led him to the doctrine of relative identity.
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  110. John R. Perry (1978). Defenses for the Mind-Brain Identity Theory: Causal Differences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):362.
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  111. John Perry (1977). Frege on Demonstratives. Philosophical Review 86 (4):474-497.
  112. John Perry (1976). The Importance of Being Identical. In Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.), The Identities of Persons. University of California Press.
     
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  113. John Perry (ed.) (1975). Personal Identity. University of California Press.
    Contents PART I: INTRODUCTION 1 John Perry: The Problem of Personal Identity, 3 PART II: VERSIONS OF THE MEMORY THEORY 2 John Locke: Of Identity and ...
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  114. John Perry (1975). Personal Identity, Memory, and the Problem of Circularity. In , Personal Identity. University of California Press.
  115. John Perry (1975). Review: Gustav Bergmann, Sameness, Meaning, and Identity; Gustav Bergmann, Individuals; Gustav Bergmann, Herbert Hochberg, Concepts. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 40 (1):106-107.
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  116. John Perry (1975). The Problem of Personal Identity. In , Personal Identity. University of California Press. 3--30.
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  117. John Perry (1974). Review: Heinrich Behmann, Max Kasbauer, Franz von Kutschera, Verlag Karl Alber, Three Paradoxical Aspects of Identity. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 39 (2):359-360.
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  118. John Perry (1972). Can the Self Divide? Journal of Philosophy 64 (7):463-88.
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  119. John Perry (1970). Review: David Wiggins, Identity and Spatio-Temporal Continuity. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (3):447-448.
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  120. John Perry (1970). The Same F. Philosophical Review 79 (2):181-200.
  121. John R. Perry (1967). Equality and Education: Remarks on Kleinberger. Studies in Philosophy and Education 5 (4):433-445.
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  122. John Perry (1966). Research at the National Zoo. Bioscience 16 (9):591-592.
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  123. John Perry (1963). Paradoxical Logic. Philosophy East and West 13 (2):155-157.
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  124. Edward N. Zalta Uri Nodelman Colin Allen & John Perry, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Notice: This PDF version was distributed by request to members of the Friends of the SEP Society and by courtesy to SEP content contributors. It is solely for their fair use. Unauthorized distribution is prohibited. To learn how to join the Friends of the SEP Society and obtain authorized PDF versions of SEP entries, please visit https://leibniz.stanford.edu/friends/.
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  125. David Israel & John Perry, Information and Architecture.
    The fact referred to we call the signal or indicating fact. The thermometer is the carrier, the property of containing mercury that has risen past 98.6 is the indicating property. The proposition that Elwood has a fever is the incremental informational content of the signal. The property of having a fever is the indicated property; Elwood is the subject matter. A signal has incremental content, given a connecting fact and relative to a constraint. 1 In this case, the connecting fact (...)
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  126. John Perry, Individuals in Informational and Intentional Content.
    In this paper, I shall defend Russell's view that Mont Blanc, with all of its snow elds, is a component part" or constituent of what is actually asserted when one utters Mont Blanc is more than 4000 meters high," and of what one believes, when one believes that Mont Blanc is 4000 meters high. I also claim, however, that a proposition that does not have Mont Blanc as a constituent plays an important role in the assertion and the belief that (...)
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  127. John Perry, U039 Semantics, Possible-Worlds.
    Possible worlds semantics (PWS) is a family of methods that have been used to analyze a wide variety of intensional phenomena, including modality, conditionals, tense and temporal adverbs, obligation, and reports of informational and cognitive content. PWS spurred the development of philosophical logic and led to new applications of logic in computer science and artificial intelligence. It revolutionized the study of the semantics of natural languages. PWS has inspired analyses of many concepts of philosophical importance, and the concept of a (...)
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  128. John Perry & Neil Scott, Disability, Inability and Cyberspace.
    Computers, the internet, and the larger communications network of which it is a part, provide an informational structure within which many of us spend a large part of our working day and a significant part of our leisure. We are, during those periods, “infonauts in cyberspace,” using the internet to get information from places near and remote, and acting in various ways through the internet to have an effect on computers and people in those places. This cyberspace revolution is changing (...)
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  129. Johan van Benthem, Maricarmen Martinez, David Israel & John Perry, The Stories of Logic and Information.
    Information is a notion of wide use and great intuitive appeal, and hence, not surprisingly, different formal paradigms claim part of it, from Shannon channel theory to Kolmogorov complexity. Information is also a widely used term in logic, but a similar diversity repeats itself: there are several competing logical accounts of this notion, ranging from semantic to syntactic. In this chapter, we will discuss three major logical accounts of information.
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  130. John Perry, 1 History of Situation Semantics.
    Situation semantics was originally conceived as an alternative to extensional model theory and possible world semantics especially suited to the analysis of various problematic constructions, including naked-infinitive perception verbs (Barwise 1981) and belief-reports (Barwise and Perry 1981a, 1981b). In its earliest forms, the central ideas were.
     
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  131. John Perry, Prolegomena to a Theory of Disability, Inability and Handicap.
    Underlying the political activism that led to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was what Ron Amundson has called the environmental conception of disability[1]. In [7] we called this the circumstantial conception of disability and handicap, and contrasted it with the intrinsic conception. We use disability to mean loss of a function, such as moving the hands or seeing, that is part of the standard repertoire for humans. Handicap is a species of inability, in particular, the inability to do something (...)
     
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  132. John Perry, Richly Grounding Symbols in ASL.
    It was once common to regard ASL as less than a full-fledged language, as a mere combination of miming, pointing and a few primitive gestures. That conception of ASL was laid to rest by William Stokoe’s landmark work [22] and much careful research that has come in its wake. This work..
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  133. John Perry, Russell's the Problems of Philosophy.
    There are many good introductions to philosophy, and many important philosophy books, but only a handful that are both; the book you have in your hands, The Problems of Philosophy by Bertrand Russell, is one of these, and one of the best.
     
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  134. John Perry, Myself and I.
    In this essay I distinguish three kinds of self-knowledge. I call these three kinds agent-relative knowledge, self-attached knowledge and knowledge of the person one happens to be. These aspects of self-knowledge differ in how the knower or agent is represented. Most of what I say will be applicable to beliefs as well as knowledge, and to other kinds of attitudes and thoughts, such as desire, as well.
     
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  135. John Perry, Self-Notions.
    ”Self-beliefs” are beliefs of the sort one ordinarily has about oneself, and expresses with the first person. These contrast with the beliefs one has in ”Casta˜neda cases,” in which one has a belief about oneself without knowing it. This paper advances an account of the nature of self-belief. According to this account, self-belief is a special case of interacting with things via notions that serve as repositories for information about objects with certain important relations to the knower, and as motivators (...)
     
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  136. John Perry, Frege on Identity, Cognitive Value, and Subject Matter.
    Frege continues by explaining what bothered him in the Begriffsschrift, and motivated his treatment of identity in that work.2 He goes on to criticize that account. By the end of the paragraph, he has introduced his key concept of sinn, abandonning not only the Begriffsschrift account of identity, but its basical semantical framework. In the Begriffsschrift Frege’s main semantic concept was content [Inhalt ]. Already in the Begriffsschrift, he is struggling with this concept. In §3 he..
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