Jake H. Davis City University of New York, Brown University
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  • Graduate student, City University of New York
  • Research staff, Brown University

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About me
I work primarily in metaethics, normative ethics, and empirically grounded moral psychology, as well as in philosophy of mind and cognitive science. My research program aims to advance current debates in these areas by drawing both from recent empirical research and also from my expertise in Buddhist philosophy, in the way that other contemporary systematic philosophers find inspiration in Hume or Kant or Aristotle. My studies in the early Buddhist texts and Buddhist philosophical psychology were complemented by long periods of intensive meditation practice, years of training as a monk in the Theravāda Buddhist tradition of Burma (Myanmar), and a decade of work interpreting between Burmese and English for meditation masters. I hold a doctorate in Philosophy from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, with an Interdisciplinary Concentration in Cognitive Science, and a master’s in Philosophy from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa.
My works
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  1. Jake H. Davis (forthcoming). Maria Heim: The Forerunner of All Things: Buddhaghosa on Mind, Intention, and Agency. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-6.
    Philosophers interested in what Buddhist ethics has to offer contemporary debates have largely focused on finding distinctively Buddhist reasons to choose to act ethically. But this may be to miss the point. Maria Heim’s recent study illustrates vividly how a very different conception of intention, agency, and ethics emerges from the canonical Pāli texts and the extensive commentaries on these attributed to the fifth-century author Buddhaghosa. She finds in this textual tradition a sophisticated moral anthropology and moral phenomenology, one that (...)
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  2. Jake H. Davis & Evan Thompson (2013). From the Five Aggregates to Phenomenal Consciousness: Toward a Cross-Cultural Cognitive Science. In Steven M. Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. John Wiley & Sons.
    Buddhism originated and developed in an Indian cultural context that featured many first-person practices for producing and exploring states of consciousness through the systematic training of attention. In contrast, the dominant methods of investigating the mind in Western cognitive science have emphasized third-person observation of the brain and behavior. In this chapter, we explore how these two different projects might prove mutually beneficial. We lay the groundwork for a cross-cultural cognitive science by using one traditional Buddhist model of the mind (...)
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  3. J. Davis (2011). Ecopsychology, Transpersonal Psychology, and Nonduality. International Journal of Transpersonal Studies 30 (1-2):137-147.
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  4. E. Condry, J. Conrad, V. Crapanzano, M. Crick, J. Cripps, M. David, J. Davis, J. Derrida, N. B. Dirks & T. Docherty (1997). Cole, J. 87 Collard, J. 54 Comito, T. 198 Condor, J. 205n2. In Andrew Dawson, Jennifer Lorna Hockey & Andrew H. Dawson (eds.), After Writing Culture: Epistemology and Praxis in Contemporary Anthropology. Routledge.
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  5. J. Davis (1994). Last Rights: Death Control and the Elderly in America by Barbara Logue. Bioethics-Oxford- 8:278-278.
     
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  6. J. Davis (1992). History and the People Without Europe.
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  7. J. Davis (1992). The Anthropology of Suffering.
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  8. J. Davis (1991). Times and Identities an Inaugural Lecture Delivered Before the University of Oxford on 1 May 1991. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  9. J. Davis (1989). Wilderness Rites of Passage. Gnosis 11:22-26.
     
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  10. J. Davis (1984). Yashj Nandan, Ed., "Emile Durkheim: Contributions to L'Année Sociologique". [REVIEW] Theory and Society 13 (1):140.
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  11. Charles Hutton, J. Davis, Johnson & G. G. Robinson (1796). A Mathematical and Philosophical Dictionary Containing an Explanation of the Terms, and an Account of the Several Subjects, Comprized Under the Heads Mathematics, Astronomy, and Philosophy Both Natural and Experimental: With an Historical Account of the Rise, Progress, and Present State of These Sciences: Also Memoirs of the Lives and Writings of the Most Eminent Authors, Both Ancient and Modern, Who by Their Discoveries or Improvements Have Contributed to the Advance of Them. In Two Volumes. With Many Cuts and Copper Plates. Printed by J. Davis, for J. Johnson, in St. Paul's Church-Yard; and G. G. And J. Robinson, in Paternoster-Row.
     
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