Amelie Rorty Boston University, Harvard University
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  1. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (forthcoming). As Diotima Saw Socrates. Arion.
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  2. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (forthcoming). From Decency to Civility by Way of Economics:" First Let's Eat and Then Talk of Right and Wrong". Social Research.
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  3. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (forthcoming). Persons as Rhetorical Categories. Social Research.
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  4. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (forthcoming). Rights: Educational, Not Cultural. Social Research.
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  5. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (forthcoming). The Cockrel Weathervane Swerves. Arion.
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  6. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty & Adam Morton (forthcoming). Appendix: Review of" The Many Faces of Evil: Historical Perspectives". [REVIEW] The Monist.
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  7. Amelie Rorty (2014). Dialogues with Paintings: Notes on How to Look and See. Journal of Aesthetic Education 48 (1):1-9.
    There is no such thing as ART. There are public monuments and celebrations of victories, icons, religious teaching, civic pride, courtier flattery, family legitimation, secularization of the sacred, celebration of the ordinary as ordinary, attempts to shock, political statements, making money, decoration of homes, corporations, visual debates on what the world looks like—debates about what the world is—debates about what we see. On the other hand, we can look at anything—clouds, a tree, a face, a road, a herd of cows (...)
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  8. Amélie Rorty (2012). The Functional Logic of Cartesian Passions. In Sabrina Ebbersmeyer (ed.), Emotional Minds. De Gruyter. 3.
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  9. Amelie Rorty (2012). The Use and Abuse of Morality. Journal of Ethics 16 (1):1-13.
    Both morality and theories of morality play many distinctive—and sometimes apparently conflicting—functions: they identify and prohibit wrongful aggression; they chart and analyze basic duties; they present ideals for emulation; they set the terms or justice, rights and entitlements; they characterize the norms of basic decency and neighborliness. Since many of these can, in practice, come into conflict with one another, morality provides guidance for integrating priorities. Claims to morality can, however, be misused as well as used: sanctimonious self-righteousness, self-centered moral (...)
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  10. Amélie Rorty (2011). Aristotle on the Virtues of Rhetoric. Review of Metaphysics 64 (4):715-733.
    Aristotle’s phronimos is a model of the virtues: he fuses sound practical reasoning with well formed desires. Among the skills of practical reasoning are those of finding the right words and arguments in the process of deliberation. As Aristotle puts it, virtue involves doing the right thing at the right time and for the right reason. Speaking well, saying the right thing in the right way is not limited to public oratory: it pervades practical life. Aristotle’s phronimos must acquire the (...)
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  11. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (2011). The Goodness of Searching: Good as What? Good for What? Good for Whom? In Ruth Weissbourd Grant (ed.), In Search of Goodness. University of Chicago Press.
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  12. Amelie Rorty (2010). Questioning Moral Theories. Philosophy 85 (1):29-46.
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  13. Ámelie Rorty (2010). Sartre's Still-Life Portraits. Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):329-339.
    Near the outset of Faust, Goethe sets his protagonist to translating the beginning of the Book of John. Dissatisfied with translating logos as Word, Faust tries "In the beginning was Mind" (Sinn), but he quickly retreats: "Can it be Mind what makes and shapes all things? Surely it should be 'In the beginning was Power (Kraft).'" Yet reflecting that Power might be merely latent, merely potential, he perseveres until finally Spirit (Geist) prompts Faust to settle on, "In the beginning was (...)
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  14. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (2010). The Politics of Spinoza's Vanishing Dichotomies. Political Theory 38 (1):131 - 141.
    Spinoza's project of showing how the mind can be freed from its passive affects and the State from its divisive factions (E IV.Appendix and V.Preface) ultimately coincides with the aims announced in the subtitle of the Tractatus-Theologico-Politicus (TTP) "to demonstrate that [the] freedom to philosophize does not endanger the piety and obedience required for civic peace." Both projects rest on a set of provisional isomorphic distinctions—between adequate and inadequate ideas, between reason and the imagination, between active and passive affects—that Spinoza (...)
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  15. Amelie Rorty (2009). A Plea for Ambivalence. In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oup Oxford.
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  16. Amélie Rorty (2009). Educating the Practical Imagination : A Prolegomena. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press. 195.
  17. Amelie Rorty (2009). On Being Rational. Ratio 22 (3):350-358.
    To be rational is to be engaged in collaborative, corrigible, historically informed inquiry and deliberation. Critical intelligence is merely the beginning of rationality. Substantive rationality also requires reflective and imaginative inquiry. Its active exercise presupposes trust and mandates a commitment to the common good, to responsible attempts to create the political institutions and social conditions on which intellectual and political trust can flourish. Without these, formal and calculative intelligence are – however brilliant – mere cleverness; and without these, rationality can (...)
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  18. Amelie Rorty (2009). Spinoza on the Pathos of Idolatrous Love and the Hilarity of True Love. In Moira Gatens (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Benedict Spinoza. Pennsylvania State University Press.
  19. Amelie Rorty (2009). User-Friendly Self-Deception" a Traveler's Manual". In Clancy W. Martin (ed.), The Philosophy of Deception. Oxford University Press.
     
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  20. Amélie Rorty & James Schmidt (eds.) (2009). Kant's Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Aim: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
    Lively current debates about narratives of historical progress, the conditions for international justice, and the implications of globalisation have prompted a renewed interest in Kant's Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Aim. The essays in this volume, written by distinguished contributors, discuss the questions that are at the core of Kant's investigations. Does the study of history convey any philosophical insight? Can it provide political guidance? How are we to understand the destructive and bloody upheavals that constitute so (...)
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  21. Amelie Rorty (2008). Review: Zöller & Louden (Eds), Anthropology, History and Education. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (6).
  22. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (2008). Filosofia da educação, história da filosofia e política educativa. Crítica.
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  23. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (2008). The Dramatic Sources of Philosophy. Philosophy and Literature 32 (1):pp. 11-30.
    This paper traces some of the sources of Socratic dialectic: myth, drama, lyric poetry, law and the courts, pre-Socratic cosmology.
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  24. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (2006). The Vanishing Subject: The Many Faces of Subjectivity. History of Philosophy Quarterly 23 (3):191 - 209.
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  25. Amelie Rorty (ed.) (2005). Philosophers on Education: New Historical Perspectives. Routledge.
    Philosophers on Education offers us the most comprehensive available history of philosopher's views and impacts on the directions of education. As Amelie Rorty explains, in describing a history of education, we are essentially describing and gaining the clearest understanding of the issues that presently concern and divide us. The essays in this stellar collection are written by some of the finest comtemporary philosophers. Those interested in history of philosophy, epistemology, moral psychology and education, and political theory will find Philosophers on (...)
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  26. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (2004). Enough Already with "Theories of the Emotions". In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), Thinking About Feeling: Contemporary Philosophers on Emotions. Oxford University Press.
     
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  27. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (2004). The Improvisatory Dramas of Deliberation. In Cheshire Calhoun (ed.), Setting the Moral Compass: Essays by Women Philosophers. Oxford University Press.
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  28. Amélie Rorty (ed.) (2003). The Many Faces of Philosophy: Reflections From Plato to Arendt. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy is a dangerous profession, risking censorship, prison, even death. And no wonder: philosophers have questioned traditional pieties and threatened the established political order. Some claimed to know what was thought unknowable; others doubted what was believed to be certain. Some attacked religion in the name of science; others attacked science in the name of mystical poetry; some served tyrants; others were radical revolutionaries. This historically based collection of philosophers' reflections--the letters, journals, prefaces that reveal their hopes and hesitations, their (...)
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  29. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (2002). Aristotle, Kant and the Stoics. International Studies in Philosophy 34 (4):170-172.
  30. Amélie Rorty (ed.) (2001). The Many Faces of Evil: Historical Perspectives. Routledge.
    This is the first anthology to present the full range of the many forms evil. Rorty has assembled a collection of readings that include not only the most common forms of evil, such as vice, sin, cruelty and crime, but also some which are less well known, like disobedience and willfulness. The readings are drawn from a rich array of historical, philosophical, theological, literary, dramatic, psychological and legal perspectives.
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  31. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (2000). Review: Distinctive Measures of Epistemic Evaluation: Character as the Configuration of Traits. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):203 - 206.
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  32. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (2000). Spinoza's Ironic Therapy: From Anger to the Intellectual Love of God. History of Philosophy Quarterly 17 (3):261 - 276.
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  33. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1999). Political, Not Psychological. In Alan Montefiore & David Vines (eds.), Integrity in the Public and Private Domains. Routledge.
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  34. Amélie Rorty (ed.) (1998). Philosophers on Education: Historical Perspectives. Routledge.
    Philosophers on Education offers us the most comprehensive available history of philosopher's views and impacts on the directions of education. As Amelie Rorty explains, in describing a history of education, we are essentially describing and gaining the clearest understanding of the issues that presently concern and divide us. The essays in this stellar collection are written by some of the finest comtemporary philosophers. Those interested in history of philosophy, epistemology, moral psychology and education, and political theory will find Philosophers on (...)
     
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  35. Amélie Rorty (1998). Witnessing Philosophers. Philosophy and Literature 22 (2):309-327.
    Philosophic writing appears in a variety of genres, addressed to a variety of audiences; it appears nestled within distinctive 'enterprises' : Plato, Berkeley and Hume wrote dialogues; Augustine and Rousseau wrote autobiographical confessions; Mill and Bernard Williams wrote reports to Parliament; Boethius and Descartes wrote meditations; Bacon, Montaign and Hume wrote essays; Aquinas and our contemporaries contribte articles;Leibniz and Hume wrote histories' they all wrote letters and discourses.
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  36. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1998). Plato's Counsel on Education. Philosophy 73 (2):157-178.
    Plato's dialogues can be read as a carefully staged exhibition and investigation of paideia, education in the broadest sense, including all that affects the formation of character and mind. The twentieth century textbook Plato — the Plato of the Myth of the Cave and the Divided Line, the ascent to the Good through Forms and Ideas — is but one of his elusive multiple authorial personae, each taking a different perspective on his investigations. As its focused problems differ, each Platonic (...)
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  37. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1998). The Political Sources of Emotions: Greed and Anger. Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):21-33.
  38. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1997). The Ethics of Reading: A Traveler's Guide. Educational Theory 47 (1):85-89.
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  39. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1997). The Social and Political Sources of Akrasia. Ethics 107 (4):644-657.
    Akrasia is not always --or only-- a solitary failure to act on a person's judgment of what is, all things considered, best. Nor is it always a species of moral or ethical failure prompted by a form of irrationality. It is often prompted by social support and sustained by structuring political institutions.
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  40. Amélie Rorty (1996). The Two Faces of Stoicism: Rousseau and Freud. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):335-356.
  41. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1996). Descartes and Spinoza on Epistemological Egalitarianism. History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (1):35 - 53.
  42. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1996). From Exasperating Virtues to Civic Virtues. American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (3):303 - 314.
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  43. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1996). User Friendly Self-Deception: A Traveler's Manual. In Roger T. Ames & Wimal Dissanayake (eds.), Self and Deception: A Cross-Cultural Philosophical Enquiry. Albany: SUNY Press.
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  44. Martha C. Nussbaum & Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (eds.) (1995). Essays on Aristotle's De Anima. First Paperback Edition, with an Additional Essay by M.F. Burnyeat. Clarendon Press.
    Bringing together a group of outstanding new essays on Aristotle's De Anima, this book covers topics such as the relation between soul and body, sense-perception, imagination, memory, desire, and thought, which present the philosophical substance of Aristotle's views to the modern reader. The contributors write with philosophical subtlety and wide-ranging scholarship, locating their interpretations firmly within the context of Aristotle's thought as a whole. The paperback edition includes an additional essay by M. F. Burnyeat.
     
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  45. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1995). Moral Complexity, Conflicted Resonance and Virtue. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (4):949 - 956.
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  46. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1995). Moral Prejudices. Philosophical Review 104 (4):608-610.
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  47. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1995). Runes and Ruins: Teaching Reading Cultures. Journal of Philosophy of Education 29 (2):217–222.
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  48. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1994). User-Friendly Self-Deception. Philosophy 69 (268):211 - 228.
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  49. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1994). The Hidden Politics of Cultural Identification. Political Theory 22 (1):152-166.
    While cultural identification --cultural essentialism and reification-- can play an important liberating role. it is also internally oppressive; it denies the dynamics of intra cultural divisions.
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  50. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty & Mikaël Garandeau (1994). Les Multiples Visages de la Moralité. Revue de Métaphysique Et de Morale 99 (2):205 - 221.
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  51. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1993). Character. International Studies in Philosophy 25 (3):134-135.
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  52. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1993). From Passions to Sentiments: The Structure of Hume's "Treatise". History of Philosophy Quarterly 10 (2):165 - 179.
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  53. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1993). The Many Faces of Gibbard's Wise Choices, Apt Feelings. Ethics 103 (2):318-328.
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  54. Martha Craven Nussbaum & Amélie Rorty (eds.) (1992). Essays on Aristotle's De Anima. Oxford University Press.
    Bringing together a group of outstanding new essays on Aristotle's De Anima, this book covers topics such as the relation between soul and body, sense-perception, imagination, memory, desire, and thought, which present the philosophical substance of Aristotle's views to the modern reader. The contributors write with philosophical subtlety and wide-ranging scholarship, locating their interpretations firmly within the context of Aristotle's thought as a whole.u.
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  55. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1992). Colloquium 2. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 8 (1):39-79.
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  56. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1992). [Book Review] Mind in Action, Essays in the Philosophy of Mind. [REVIEW] Ethics 102:844-846.
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  57. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1992). Descartes on Thinking with the Body. In John Cottingham (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Descartes. Cambridge University Press.
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  58. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.) (1992). Essays on Aristotle's Poetics. Princeton University Press.
    Aimed at deepening our understanding of the Poetics, this collection places Aristotle's analysis of tragedy in its larger philosophical context.
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  59. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1992). The Advantages of Moral Diversity. Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (02):38-.
    We are well served, both practically and morally, by moral and ethical diversity. Moral deliberation requires the collaboration of distinctive perspectives: consequentialist, deontological, perfectionist considerations each contribute significant dimensions in determining what is good and what is right; virtue theory highlights the development of reliable ethical character.
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  60. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1992). The Directions of Aristotle's "Rhetoric". Review of Metaphysics 46 (1):63 - 95.
  61. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1991). Rousseau's Therapeutic Experiments. Philosophy 66 (258):413 - 434.
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  62. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1991). The Psychology of Aristotelian Tragedy. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 16 (1):53-72.
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  63. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1991). King Solomon and Everyman: A Problem in Coordinating Conflicting Moral Intuitions. American Philosophical Quarterly 28 (3):181 - 194.
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  64. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1991). Paradox, Will and Religious Belief, Charles Gurrey. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3).
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  65. Amelie Rorty (1990). The Thread of Life. International Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):149-150.
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  66. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1990). Persons and Personae. In Christopher Gill (ed.), The Person and the Human Mind: Issues in Ancient and Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  67. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1990). Varieties of Pluralism in a Polyphonic Society. Review of Metaphysics 44 (1):3 - 20.
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  68. Amelie Rorty (1989). &Quot;socrates and Sophia Perform the Philosophic Turn. In A. Cohen and B. Desai (ed.), The Institution of Philosophy. Open Court.
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  69. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1989). Relativism, Persons, and Practices. In M. Krausz (ed.), Relativism: Interpretation and Confrontation. Notre Dame University Press.
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  70. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty & Brian P. McLaughlin (1989). Perspectives on Self-Deception. University of California Press.
     
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  71. Brian P. McLaughlin & Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (eds.) (1988). Perspectives on Self-Deception. University of California Press.
    00 Students of philosophy, psychology, sociology, and literature will welcome this collection of original essays on self-deception and related phenomena such as ...
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  72. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1988). The Deceptive Self: Liars, Layers, and Lairs. In Brian P. McLaughlin & Amelie O. Rorty (eds.), Perspectives on Self-Deception. University of California Press.
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  73. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1987). The Historicity of Psychological Attitudes: Love Is Not Love Which Alters Not When It Alteration Finds. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 10 (1):399-412.
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  74. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1987). The Two Faces of Spinoza. Review of Metaphysics 41 (2):299 - 316.
  75. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1986). The Two Faces of Courage. Philosophy 61 (236):151 - 171.
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  76. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1985). Self-Deception, Akrasia and Irrationality. In Jon Elster (ed.), The Multiple Self. Cambridge University Press.
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  77. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1984). Aristotle on the Metaphysical Status of "Pathe". Review of Metaphysics 37 (3):521 - 546.
  78. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1984). Formal Traces in Cartesian Functional Explanation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 14 (4):545 - 560.
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  79. Amelie Rorty (1983). Akratic Believers. American Philosophical Quarterly 20 (2):175-183.
    A person has performed an action akratically when he intentionally, voluntarily acts contrary to what he thinks, all things considered, is best to do. This is very misleadingly called weakness of the will; less misleadingly, akrasia of action. I should like to show that there is intellectual as well as practical akrasia. This might, equally misleadingly, be called weakness of belief; less misleadingly, akrasia of belief.
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  80. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1983). Fearing Death. Philosophy 58 (224):175 - 188.
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  81. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1983). Experiments in Philosophic Genre: Descartes' "Meditations". Critical Inquiry 9 (3):545.
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  82. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1982). From Passions to Emotions and Sentiments. Philosophy 57 (220):159 - 172.
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  83. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1980). 1980. In Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.), Essays on Aristotle's Ethics. University of California Press.
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  84. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.) (1980). Explaining Emotions. University of California Press.
    The philosopher must inform himself of the relevant empirical investigation to arrive at a definition, and the scientist cannot afford to be naive about the..
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  85. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.) (1980). Essays on Aristotle's Ethics. University of California Press.
    This compilation will mark a high point of excellence in its genre."--Gregory Vlastos, University of California, Berkeley.
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  86. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1980). Vi. Akrasia and Conflict. Inquiry 23 (2):193 – 212.
    As Elster suggests in his chapter 'Contradictions of the Mind', in Logic and Society, akrasia and self-deception represent the most common psychological functions for a person in conflict and contradiction. This article develops the theme of akrasia and conflict. Section I says what akrasia is not. Section II describes the character of the akrates, analyzing the sorts of conflicts to which he is subject and describing the sources of his debilities. A brief account is then given of the attractions of (...)
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  87. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1980). Where Does the Akratic Break Take Place? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58 (4):333 – 346.
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  88. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1979). An Open Letter to the Editor. Philosophy 54 (208):239 - 241.
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  89. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1978). Butler on Benevolence and Conscience. Philosophy 53 (204):171 - 184.
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  90. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1978). Explaining Emotions. Journal of Philosophy 75 (March):139-161.
  91. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1978). The Place of Contemplation in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Mind 87 (347):343-358.
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  92. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1976). A Literary Postscript: Characters, Persons, Selves, Individuals. In , The Identities of Persons. University of California Press. 301--323.
  93. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.) (1976). Survival and Identity. University of California Press.
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  94. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.) (1976). The Identities of Persons. University of California Press.
    In this volume, thirteen philosophers contribute new essays analyzing the criteria for personal identity and their import on ethics and the theory of action: it ...
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  95. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1975). Adaptivity and Self-Knowledge. Inquiry 18 (1):1-22.
    In this paper the view is presented that self?knowledge has no special status; its varieties constitute distinctive classes, differing from one another more sharply than each does from analogous knowledge of others. Most cases of self?knowledge are best understood contextually, subsumed under such other activities as decision?making and socializing. First person, present tense ?reports? of sensations, intentions, and thoughts are primarily adaptively expressive, only secondarily truth?functional. The last section sketches some of the disadvantages, as well as some of the advantages, (...)
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  96. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1974). The Place of Pleasure in Aristotle's Ethics. Mind 83 (332):481-497.
    BACKGROUND: Although placing patients with acute respiratory failure in a prone (face down) position improves their oxygenation 60 to 70 percent of the time, the effect on survival is not known. METHODS: In a multicenter, randomized trial, we compared conventional treatment (in the supine position) of patients with acute lung injury or the acute respiratory distress syndrome with a predefined strategy of placing patients in a prone position for six or more hours daily for 10 days. We enrolled 304 patients, (...)
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  97. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1973). The Transformations of Persons. Philosophy 48 (185):261 - 275.
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  98. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1973). Persons, Policies, and Bodies. International Philosophical Quarterly 13 (1):63-80.
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  99. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1972). A Speculative Note on Some Dramatic Elements in the Theaetetus. Phronesis 17 (3):227-238.
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  100. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1972). Belief and Self-Deception. Inquiry 15 (1-4):387-410.
    In Part I, I consider the normal contexts of assertions of belief and declarations of intentions, arguing that many action-guiding beliefs are accepted uncritically and even pre-consciously. I analyze the function of avowals as expressions of attempts at self-transformation. It is because assertions of beliefs are used to perform a wide range of speech acts besides that of speaking the truth, and because there is a large area of indeterminacy in such assertions, that self-deception is possible. In Part II, I (...)
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  101. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1972). Essential Possibilities in the Actual World. Review of Metaphysics 25 (4):607 - 624.
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  102. Amelie Rorty (1971). Not Every Homunculus Spoils the Argument. In Marjorie G. Grene (ed.), Interpretations of Life and Mind: Essays Around the Problem of Reduction. Humanities Press. 75.
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  103. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1971). Naturalism, Paradigms, and Ideology. Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):637 - 667.
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  104. Amelie Rorty (1970). Plato and Aristotle on Belief, Habit, and "Akrasia". American Philosophical Quarterly 7 (1):50 - 61.
  105. Amélie Rorty (1966). Pragmatic Philosophy: An Anthology. Garden City, N.Y.,Anchor Books.
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  106. Charles Hartshorne, Ernest Hocking, Amélie Oksenberg Rorty, V. C. Chappell, Robert Whittemore, Glenn A. Olds, Samuel M. Thompson, W. Norris Clarke, Eliseo Vivas & E. S. Salmon (1956). Comments on Stallknecht's Theses. Review of Metaphysics 9 (3):464 - 481.
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