Emily S. Lee California State University, Fullerton
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  • Faculty, California State University, Fullerton
  • PhD, State University of New York, Stony Brook, 2005.

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About me
Emily S. Lee is Associate Professor of philosophy at California State University at Fullerton. Her research interests include feminist philosophy, philosophy of race and phenomenology. She has published articles on phenomenology and epistemology in regards to the embodiment of women of color. She is currently working on a monograph concerning the phenomenology of race and an anthology on phenomenology, embodiment, and race (elee@fullerton.edu).
My works
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  1. Emily S. Lee (ed.) (2014). Living Alterities: Phenomenology, Embodiment, and Race.
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  2. Emily S. Lee (2014). The Ambiguous Practices of the Inauthentic Asian American Woman. Hypatia 29 (1):146-163.
    The Asian American identity is intimately associated with upward class mobility as the model minority, yet women's earnings remain less than men's, and Asian American women are perceived to have strong family ties binding them to domestic responsibilities. As such, the exact class status of Asian American women is unclear. The immediate association of this ethnic identity with a specific class as demonstrated by the recently released Pew study that Asian Americans are “the highest-income, best-educated” ethnicity contrasts with another study (...)
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  3. David Haekwon Kim, Emily S. Lee, Eduardo Mendieta, Mickaella Perina & Falguni A. Sheth (2012). An Unruly Theory of Race. [REVIEW] Hypatia 27 (3):898 - 902.
  4. Emily S. Lee (2012). Contexts and Agency. [REVIEW] Hypatia 27 (4):902 - 906.
  5. Emily S. Lee (2011). The Epistemology of the Question of Authenticity, in Place of Strategic Essentialism. Hypatia 26 (2):258--279.
    The question of authenticity centers in the lives of women of color to invite and restrict their representative roles. For this reason, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak and Uma Narayan advocate responding with strategic essentialism. This paper argues against such a strategy and proposes an epistemic understanding of the question of authentic- ity. The question stems from a kernel of truth—the connection between experience and knowledge. But a coherence theory of knowledge better captures the sociality and the holism of experience and knowledge.
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  6. Kristen Intemann, Emily S. Lee, Kristin Mccartney, Shireen Roshanravan & Alexa Schriempf (2010). What Lies Ahead: Envisioning New Futures for Feminist Philosophy. Hypatia 25 (4):927 - 934.
    Thanks in large, part to the record of schohrship fostered by Hypatia, feminist philosophers are now positioned not just as critics of the canon, but as innovators advancing uniquely feminist perspectives for theorizing about the world. As relatively junior feminist scholars, the five of us were called upon to provide some reflections on emerging trends in feminist philosophy and to comment on its future. Despite the fact that we come from diverse subfields and philosophical traditions, four common aims emerged in (...)
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  7. Kristen Intemann, L. E. E. S., Kristin Mccartney, Shireen Roshanravan & Alexa Schriempf (2010). What Lies Ahead: Envisioning New Futures for Feminist Philosophy. Hypatia 25 (4):927-934.
    Thanks in large part to the record of scholarship fostered by Hypatia, feminist philosophers are now positioned not just as critics of the canon, but as innovators advancing uniquely feminist perspectives for theorizing about the world. As relatively junior feminist scholars, the five of us were called upon to provide some reflections on emerging trends in feminist philosophy and to comment on its future. Despite the fact that we come from diverse subfields and philosophical traditions, four common aims emerged in (...)
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  8. Emily S. Lee (2010). Madness and Judiciousness: A Phenomenological Reading of a Black Woman’s Encounter with a Saleschild. In Maria Del Guadalupe Davidson, Kathryn T. Gines & Donna-Dale L. Marcano (eds.), Convergences: Black Feminism and Continental Philosophy. SUNY Press.
    Patricia Williams in her book, The Alchemy of Race and Rights, describes being denied entrance in the middle of the afternoon by a “saleschild.” Utilizing the works of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, this article explores their interaction phenomenologically. This small interaction of seemingly simple misunderstanding represents a limit condition in Merleau-Ponty’s analysis. His phenomenological framework does not explain the chasm between the “saleschild” and Williams, that in a sense they do not participate in the same world. This interaction between the “saleschild” and (...)
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  9. Emily S. Lee (2010). Review of Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell, Susan Sherwin (Eds.), Embodiment and Agency. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (2).
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  10. Emily S. Lee (2008). A Phenomenology for Homi Bhabha's Postcolonial Metropolitan Subject. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (4):537-557.
    Homi Bhabha attends to the figure of the postcolonial metropolitan subject-a racialized subject who is not representative of the first world, yet a symbol of the metropolitan sphere. Bhabha describes theirdaily lives as inextricably split or doubled. His analysis cannot account for the agonistic moments when one is caught in not knowing, in focusing attention, and in developing understanding. Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology with the openness in the horizon of the gestaltian framework better accounts for such splits as moments on the (...)
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  11. Emily S. Lee (2008). Book Review of Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss’s Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty. [REVIEW] American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 7 (2):24--26.
  12. Emily S. Lee (2008). Ode to a Pot. American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 8 (1):17--18.
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  13. Emily S. Lee (2005). Towards a Lived Understanding of Race and Sex. Philosophy Today 49 (SPEP Supplement):82-88.
    Utilizing Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s work, I argue that the gestaltian framework’s co-determinacy of the theme and the horizon in seeing and experiencing the world serves as an encompassing epistemological framework with which to understand racism. Conclusions reached: as bias is unavoidably part of being in the world, defining racism as bias is superfluous; racism is sedimented into our very perceptions and experiences of the world and not solely a prejudice of thought; neutral perception of skin color is impossible. Phenomenology accounts for (...)
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  14. Emily S. Lee (2004). The Gender of Science. Teaching Philosophy 27 (2):193-195.
  15. A. Fisher, L. Gormally, C. G. Helman, E. Lee, S. R. Lord, C. Sherrington, H. B. Menz, S. Loue, A. Morton-Cooper & A. Palmer (2002). Realities. Oxford: Blackwell Science. 224 Pp.£ 17.99 (PB). ISBN 0 632 05157 4. Brett H 2002: Complementary Therapies in the Care of Older People. London: Whurr. 278 Pp.£ 19.50 (PB). ISBN 1 86156 304 3. Burns S, Bulman C Eds 2000: Reflective Practice in Nursing: The Growth of the Profes-Sional Practitioner, Oxford: Blackwell Science. 214 Pp.£ 15.99 (PB). [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 9 (6).
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  16. Emily S. Lee (2002). The Meaning of Visible Differences of the Body. Apa Newsletters 2 (2):34--37.
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