Hylarie Kochiras École Normale Supérieure
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  • Postdoc, École Normale Supérieure
  • PhD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 2008.

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About me
Hylarie Kochiras is currently a postdoctoral fellow at École Normale Supérieure de Paris. She was previously a postdoctoral fellow at The Cohn Institute of Tel Aviv University, and prior to that a visiting scholar at the Department of Philosophy & History of Science (ΜΙΘΕ) of the University of Athens. She held a European Institutes for Advanced Study (EURIAS) fellowship during 2011-2012 at Bucharest’s New Europe College, and was a postdoctoral fellow during 2010-2011 at the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Philosophy of Science during 2010-2011. She was, previously Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University at Buffalo (2008-2010), following her Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research focuses early modern philosophy of science. Contact: kochiras(at)nec.ro.
My works
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  1. Hylarie Kochiras (2013). Causal Language and the Structure of Force in Newton'sSystem of the World. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (2):210-235.
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  2. Hylarie Kochiras (2013). The Mechanical Philosophy and Newton's Mechanical Force. Philosophy of Science 80 (4):557-578.
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  3. Hylarie Kochiras (2012). By Ye Divine Arm: God and Substance in De Gravitatione. Religious Studies 2012 (September):1-30.
    This article interprets Newton’s De gravitatione as presenting a reductive account of substance, on which divine and created substances are identified with their characteristic attributes, which are present in space. God is identical to the divine power to create, and mind to its characteristic power. Even bodies lack parts outside parts, for they are not constructed from regions of actual space, as some commentators suppose, but rather consist in powers alone, maintained in certain configurations by the divine will. This interpretation (...)
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  4. Hylarie Kochiras (2012). Spiritual Presence and Dimensional Space Beyond the Cosmos. Intellectual History Review 22 (1):41-68.
    This paper examines connections between concepts of space and extension on the one hand and immaterial spirits on the other, specifically the immanentist concept of spirits as present in rerum natura. Those holding an immanentist concept, such as Thomas Aquinas, typically understood spirits non-dimensionally as present by essence and power; and that concept was historically linked to holenmerism, the doctrine that the spirit is whole in every part. Yet as Aristotelian ideas about extension were challenged and an actual, infinite, dimensional (...)
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  5. Peter Machamer, J. E. Mcguire & Hylarie Kochiras (2012). Newton and the Mechanical Philosophy: Gravitation as the Balance of the Heavens. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):370-388.
    We argue that Isaac Newton really is best understood as being in the tradition of the Mechanical Philosophy and, further, that Newton saw himself as being in this tradition. But the tradition as Newton understands it is not that of Robert Boyle and many others, for whom the Mechanical Philosophy was defined by contact action and a corpuscularean theory of matter. Instead, as we argue in this paper, Newton interpreted and extended the Mechanical Philosophy's slogan “matter and motion” in reference (...)
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  6. Hylarie Kochiras (2011). Gravity's Cause and Substance Counting: Contextualizing the Problems. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 42 (1):167-184.
    This paper considers Newton’s position on gravity’s cause, both conceptually and historically. With respect to the historical question, I argue that while Newton entertained various hypotheses about gravity’s cause, he never endorsed any of them, and in particular, his lack of confidence in the hypothesis of robust and unmediated distant action by matter is explained by an inclination toward certain metaphysical principles. The conceptual problem about gravity’s cause, which I identified earlier along with a deeper problem about individuating substances, is (...)
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  7. Hylarie Kochiras (2009). Gravity and Newton's Substance Counting Problem. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 40 (3):267-280.
    A striking feature of Newton’s thought is the very broad reach of his empiricism, potentially extending even to immaterial substances, including God, minds, and should one exist, a non-perceiving immaterial medium. Yet Newton is also drawn to certain metaphysical principles—most notably the principle that matter cannot act where it is not—and this second, rationalist feature of his thought is most pronounced in his struggle to discover ‘gravity’s cause’. The causal problem remains vexing, for he neither invokes primary causation, nor accepts (...)
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  8. Hylarie Kochiras, Locke's Philosophy of Science. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This article examines questions connected with the two features of Locke's intellectual landscape that are most salient for understanding his philosophy of science: (1) the profound shift underway in disciplinary boundaries, in methodological approaches to understanding the natural world, and in conceptions of induction and scientific knowledge; and (2) the dominant scientific theory of his day, the corpuscular hypothesis. Following the introduction, section 2 addresses questions connected to changing conceptions of scientific knowledge. What does Locke take science (scientia) and scientific (...)
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  9. Hylarie Kochiras (2006). Фрейд сказал или “саймон говорит”*? Информированное согласие и развитие психоанализа как науки. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9:227-241.
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  10. Hylarie Kochiras (2006). Belief Contexts and Epistemic Possibility. Principia 10 (1):1-20.
    Although epistemic possibility figures in several debates, those debates have had relatively little contact with one another. G. E. Moore focused squarely upon analyzing epistemic uses of the phrase, ‘It’s possible that p’, and in doing so he made two fundamental assumptions. First, he assumed that epistemic possibility statements always express the epistemic position of a community, as opposed to that of an individual speaker. Second, he assumed that all epistemic uses of ‘It’s possible that p’ are analyzable in terms (...)
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  11. Hylarie Kochiras (2006). Freud Said--Or Simon Says? Informed Consent and the Advancement of Psychoanalysis as a Science. Medicine, Health Care, and Philosophy 9 (2):227-241.
    Is it ever permissible to publish a patient’s confidences without permission? I investigate this question for the field of psychoanalysis. Whereas most medical fields adopted a 1995 recommendation for consent requirements, psychoanalysis continues to defend the traditional practice of nonconsensual publication. Both the hermeneutic and the scientific branches of the field justify the practice, arguing that it provides data needed to help future patients, and both branches advance generalizations and causal claims. However the hermeneutic branch embraces methods tending to undermine (...)
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