Christian Barry Australian National University
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  • Faculty, Australian National University
  • PhD, Columbia University, 2005.

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About me
My research focuses on ethical theory and international justice. My recent work include a monograph with Sanjay Reddy, International Trade and Labour Standards: A Proposal for Linkage (Columbia University Press), and articles in Philosophy & Public Affairs, Review of International Studies, International Affairs, Journal of Political Philosophy, Journal of Moral Philosophy, Political Studies, Cornell Journal of International Law, and the Journal of Applied Philosophy my book with Gerhard Øverland, Responding to Global Poverty: Harm, Responsibility, and Agency will by published by Cambridge University Press in 2016
My works
54 items found.
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  1.  79
    Christian Barry & Luara Ferracioli (forthcoming). Can Withdrawing Citizenship Be Justified? Political Studies.
    When can or should citizenship be granted to prospective members of states? When can or should states withdraw citizenship from their existing members? In recent decades, political philosophers have paid considerable attention to the first question, but have generally neglected the second. There are of course good practical reasons for prioritizing the question of when citizenship should be granted—many individuals have a strong interest in acquiring citizenship in particular political communities, while many fewer are at risk of denationalization. Still, loss (...)
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  2.  69
    Christian Barry & Kate Macdonald (forthcoming). How Should We Conceive of Individual Consumer Responsibility to Address Labour Injustices? In Yossi Dahan, Hanna Lerner & Faina Milman-Sivan (eds.), Global Justice and International Labour Rights. Cambridge University Press
    Many approaches to addressing labour injustices—shortfalls from minimally decent wages and working conditions— focus on how governments should orient themselves toward other states in which such phenomena take place, or to the firms that are involved with such practices. But of course the question of how to regard such labour practices must also be faced by individuals, and individual consumers of the goods that are produced through these practices in particular. Consumers have become increasingly aware of their connections to complex (...)
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  3.  46
    Christian Barry & Patrick Tomlin (forthcoming). Moral Uncertainty and Permissibility: Evaluating Option Sets. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-26.
    In this essay, we explore an issue of moral uncertainty: what we are permitted to do when we are unsure about which moral principles are correct. We develop a novel approach to this issue that incorporates important insights from previous work on moral uncertainty, while avoiding some of the difficulties that beset existing alternative approaches. Our approach is based on evaluating and choosing between option sets rather than particular conduct options. We show how our approach is particularly well-suited to address (...)
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  4.  59
    Christian Barry & David Wiens (forthcoming). What Second-Best Scenarios Reveal About Ideals of Global Justice. In Thom Brooks (ed.), Oxford Handbook to Global Justice.
    In theory, there need be no conflict between addressing global inequality (inequalities between people worldwide) and addressing domestic inequality (inequalities between people within a political community). Yet, in practice, there are likely instances in which the feasible mechanisms for reducing global inequality risk aggravating domestic inequality. The burgeoning literature on global justice has tended to overlook the latter type of scenario. This chapter explores ways in which tradeoffs between promoting domestic and global equality may arise and how they may be (...)
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  5. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (forthcoming). Individual Responsibility for Carbon Emissions: Is There Anything Wrong with Overdetermining Harm? In Jeremy Moss (ed.), Climate Change and Justice. Cambridge University Press
    Climate change and other harmful large-scale processes challenge our understandings of individual responsibility. People throughout the world suffer harms—severe shortfalls in health, civic status, or standard of living relative to the vital needs of human beings—as a result of physical processes to which many people appear to contribute. Climate change, polluted air and water, and the erosion of grasslands, for example, occur because a great many people emit carbon and pollutants, build excessively, enable their flocks to overgraze, or otherwise stress (...)
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  6. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2016). Responding to Global Poverty: Harm, Responsibility, and Agency. Cambridge University Press.
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  7. Christian Barry & Robert Kirby (2015). Scepticism About Beneficiary Pays: A Critique. Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4).
    Some moral theorists argue that being an innocent beneficiary of significant harms inflicted by others may be sufficient to ground special duties to address the hardships suffered by the victims, at least when it is impossible to extract compensation from those who perpetrated the harm. This idea has been applied to climate change in the form of the beneficiary-pays principle. Other philosophers, however, are quite sceptical about beneficiary pays. Our aim in this article is to examine their critiques. We conclude (...)
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  8.  4
    Christian Barry & Robert Kirby (2015). Scepticism About Beneficiary Pays: A Critique. Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2).
    Some moral theorists argue that being an innocent beneficiary of significant harms inflicted by others may be sufficient to ground special duties to address the hardships suffered by the victims, at least when it is impossible to extract compensation from those who perpetrated the harm. This idea has been applied to climate change in the form of the beneficiary-pays principle. Other philosophers, however, are quite sceptical about beneficiary pays. Our aim in this article is to examine their critiques. We conclude (...)
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  9.  57
    Christian Barry (2014). Review of Mathias Risse, On Global Justice. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 5.
  10.  44
    Christian Barry (2014). The Regulation of Harm in International Trade: A Critique of James's Collective Due Care Principle. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (2):255-263.
    In his important recent book, Aaron James has defended a principle ? Collective Due Care ? for determining when a form of economic integration is morally objectionable because it causes unjustified harm (including unemployment, wage suppression and diminished working conditions). This essay argues that Collective Due Care would yield implausible judgements about trade practices and would be too indeterminate to play the practical role for which it is intended.
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  11. Christian Barry, Matthew Lindauer & Gerhard Øverland (2014). Doing, Allowing, and Enabling Harm: An Empirical Investigation. In Joshua Knobe, Tania Lombrozo & Shaun Nichols (eds.), Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy. Oxford University Press
    Traditionally, moral philosophers have distinguished between doing and allowing harm, and have normally proceeded as if this bipartite distinction can exhaustively characterize all cases of human conduct involving harm. By contrast, cognitive scientists and psychologists studying causal judgment have investigated the concept ‘enable’ as distinct from the concept ‘cause’ and other causal terms. Empirical work on ‘enable’ and its employment has generally not focused on cases where human agents enable harm. In this paper, we present new empirical evidence to support (...)
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  12.  97
    Christian Barry & David Wiens (2014). Benefiting From Wrongdoing and Sustaining Wrongful Harm. Brill.
    _ Source: _Page Count 23 Some moral theorists argue that innocent beneficiaries of wrongdoing may have special remedial duties to address the hardships suffered by the victims of the wrongdoing. These arguments generally aim to simply motivate the idea that being a beneficiary can provide an independent ground for charging agents with remedial duties to the victims of wrongdoing. Consequently, they have neglected contexts in which it is implausible to charge beneficiaries with remedial duties to the victims of wrongdoing, thereby (...)
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  13. Christian Barry & Scott Wisor (2014). The Ethics of International Trade. In Darrel Moellendorf & Heather Widdows (eds.), Handbook of Global Ethics. Routledge
  14. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2014). The Implications of Failing to Assist. Social Theory and Practice 40 (4):570-590.
    In this essay we argue that an agent’s failure to assist someone in need at one time can change the cost she can be morally required to take on to assist that same person at a later time. In particular, we show that the cost the agent can subsequently be required to take on to help the person in need can increase quite significantly, and can be enforced through the proportionate use of force. We explore the implications of this argument (...)
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  15. Robert E. Goodin & Christian Barry (2014). Benefiting From the Wrongdoing of Others. Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):363-376.
    Bracket out the wrong of committing a wrong, or conspiring or colluding or conniving with others in their committing one. Suppose you have done none of those things, and you find yourself merely benefiting from a wrong committed wholly by someone else. What, if anything, is wrong with that? What, if any, duties follow from it? If straightforward restitution were possible — if you could just ‘give back’ what you received as a result of the wrongdoing to its rightful owner (...)
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  16. Christian Barry & Luara Ferracioli (2013). Young on Responsibility and Structural Injustice. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 32 (3):247-257.
    Our aim in this essay is to critically examine Iris Young’s arguments in her important posthumously published book against what she calls the liability model for attributing responsibility, as well as the arguments that she marshals in support of what she calls the social connection model of political responsibility. We contend that her arguments against the liability model of conceiving responsibility are not convincing, and that her alternative to it is vulnerable to damaging objections.
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  17. Christian Barry & Scott Wisor (2013). Global Poverty. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell
  18. Christian Barry & Scott Wisor (2013). World Trade Organization. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley
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  19.  78
    Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2013). How Much for the Child? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (1):189-204.
    In this paper we explore what sacrifices you are morally required to make to save a child who is about to die in front of you. It has been argued that you would have very demanding duties to save such a child (or any adult who is in similar circumstance through no fault of their own, for that matter), and some examples have been presented to make this claim seem intuitively correct. Against this, we argue that you do not in (...)
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  20. Christian Barry (2012). Local Priorities, Universal Priorities, and Enabling Harm. Ethics and International Affairs 26 (1):21-26.
  21. Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). Introduction. In Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith (eds.), Global Justice. Ashgate
    This volume brings together a range of influential essays by distinguished philosophers and political theorists on the issue of global justice. Global justice concerns the search for ethical norms that should govern interactions between people, states, corporations and other agents acting in the global arena, as well as the design of social institutions that link them together. The volume includes articles that engage with major theoretical questions such as the applicability of the ideals of social and economic equality to the (...)
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  22. Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith (eds.) (2012). Global Justice. Ashgate.
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  23. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2012). Are Trade Subsidies and Tariffs Killing the Global Poor? Social Research (4):865-896.
    In recent years it has often been claimed that policies such as subsidies paid to domestic producers by affluent countries and tariffs on goods produced by foreign producers in poorer countries violate important moral requirements because they do severe harm to poor people, even kill them. Such claims involve an empirical aspect—such policies are on balance very bad for the global poor—and a philosophical aspect—that the causal influence of these policies can fairly be characterized as doing severe harm and killing. (...)
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  24. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2012). The Feasible Alternatives Thesis: Kicking Away the Livelihoods of the Global Poor. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (1):97-119.
    Many assert that affluent countries have contributed in the past to poverty in developing countries through wars of aggression and conquest, colonialism and its legacies, the imposition of puppet leaders, and support for brutal dictators and venal elites. Thomas Pogge has recently argued that there is an additional and, arguably, even more consequential way in which the affluent continue to contribute to poverty in the developing world. He argues that when people cooperate in instituting and upholding institutional arrangements that foreseeably (...)
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  25. Jonathan Pickering & Christian Barry (2012). On the Concept of Climate Debt: Its Moral and Political Value. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (5):667-685.
    A range of developing countries and international advocacy organizations have argued that wealthy countries, as a result of their greater historical contribution to human-induced climate change, owe a ?climate debt? to poor countries. Critics of this argument have claimed that it is incoherent or morally objectionable. In this essay we clarify the concept of climate debt and assess its value for conceptualizing responsibilities associated with global climate change and for guiding international climate negotiations. We conclude that the idea of a (...)
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  26. Christian Barry (2011). A Challenge to the Reigning Theory of the Just War. International Affairs 87 (2):457-466.
  27. Christian Barry (2011). Immigration and Global Justice. Global Justice Theory Practice Rhetoric 4 (1):30-38.
  28.  59
    Christian Barry, Redistribution. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  29.  45
    Christian Barry (2011). Sovereign Debt, Human Rights, and Policy Conditionality. Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (3):282-305.
  30. Christian Barry & Matt Peterson (2011). Who Should Pay for the Damage of the Global Financial Crisis? In Ned Dobos Christian Barry & Thomas Pogge (eds.), Global Financial Crisis:The Ethical Issues. Palgrave
  31. Christian Barry & Nicholas Southwood (2011). What Is Special About Human Rights? Ethics and International Affairs 25 (3):369-83.
    Despite the prevalence of human rights discourse, the very idea or concept of a human right remains obscure. In particular, it is unclear what is supposed to be special or distinctive about human rights. In this paper, we consider two recent attempts to answer this challenge, James Griffin’s “personhood account” and Charles Beitz’s “practice-based account”, and argue that neither is entirely satisfactory. We then conclude with a suggestion for what a more adequate account might look like – what we call (...)
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  32. Ned Dobos, Christian Barry & Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge (eds.) (2011). Global Financial Crisis: The Ethical Issues. Palgrave Macmillan.
  33.  51
    Gerhard Øverland & Christian Barry (2011). Do Democratic Societies Have a Right to Do Wrong? Journal of Social Philosophy 42 (2):111-131.
  34. Christian Barry & Matthew Peterson (2010). Dealing Fairly with the Costs to the Poor of the Global Financial Crisis. In Iain MacNeil & Justin O'Brien (eds.), The Future of Financial Regulation. Hart
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  35. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2010). Why Remittances to Poor Countries Should Not Be Taxed. NYU Journal of International Law and Politics 42 (1):1180-1207.
  36. Lucy Allais, David Archard, Neera Badhwar, Christian Barry, Paul Bloomfield, Campbell Brown, Vittorio Bufacchi, Erik Carlson, Paula Casal & Richard Chappell (2009). Referees for Volume 6. Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (4):549-550.
     
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  37. Christian Barry & Laura Valentini (2009). Egalitarian Challenges to Global Egalitarianism: A Critique. Review of International Studies 35:485-512.
  38. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2009). Responding to Global Poverty: Review Essay of Peter Singer, the Life You Can Save. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (2):239-247.
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  39. Lea Ypi, Robert E. Goodin & Christian Barry (2009). Associative Duties, Global Justice, and the Colonies. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (2):103-135.
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  40.  23
    Christian Barry (2008). Christopher F. Zurn,Deliberative Democracy and the Institutions of Judicial Review:Deliberative Democracy and the Institutions of Judicial Review. Ethics 118 (4):767-772.
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  41. Christian Barry & Pablo Gilabert (2008). Does Global Egalitarianism Provide an Impractical and Unattractive Ideal of Justice? International Affairs 84 (5):1025-1039.
    In his important new book National responsibility and global justice, David Miller presents a systematic challenge to existing theories of global justice. In particular, he argues that cosmopolitan egalitarianism must be rejected. Such views, Miller maintains, would place unacceptable burdens on the most productive political communities, undermine national self-determination, and disincentivize political communities from taking responsibility for their fate. They are also impracticable and quite unrealistic, at least under present conditions. Miller offers an alternative account that conceives global justice in (...)
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  42.  34
    Christian Barry & Sanjay Reddy (2008). International Trade and Labor Standards:A Proposal for Linkage. Columbia University Press.
    In this book, Christian Barry and Sanjay G. Reddy propose ways in which the international trading system can support poor countries in promoting the well-being of their peoples.
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  43.  38
    Christian Barry (2007). Deen K. Chatterjee, Ed., The Ethics of Assistance: Morality and the Distant Needy:The Ethics of Assistance: Morality and the Distant Needy. Ethics 117 (2):338-342.
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  44.  63
    Christian Barry & Lydia Tomitova (2007). Fairness in Sovereign Debt. Ethics and International Affairs 21 (s1):41-79.
    When can we say that a debt crisis has been resolved fairly? An often overlooked but very important effect of financial crises and the debts that often engender them is that they can lead the crisis countries to increased dependence on international institutions and the policy conditionality they require in return for their continued support, limiting their capabilities and those of their citizens to exercise meaningful control over their policies and institutions. These outcomes have been viewed by many not merely (...)
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  45.  53
    Christian Barry (2006). Is Global Institutional Reform a False Promise? Cornell International Law Journal 39 (3):523-536.
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  46.  4
    Christian Barry & Thomas W. Pogge (eds.) (2006). Global Institutions and Responsibilities. John Wiley & Sons.
    This book helps readers identify feasible and morally plausible reforms of global institutional arrangements and international organizations. A distinctive, practically oriented contribution to debates about global justice. Helps readers to examine the fairness of global rules and institutions. Integrates philosophical thinking about normative responsibility with discussion of practical dilemmas concerning organizations such as the WTO, and rules governing the use of force internationally. Brings together original articles by political philosophers, legal theorists, and economists. Considers the aims of global justice, the (...)
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  47.  45
    Christian Barry (2005). Applying the Contribution Principle. Metaphilosophy 36 (1-2):210-227.
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  48. Christian Barry & Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge (eds.) (2005). Global Institutions and Responsibilities: Achieving Global Justice. Blackwell.
    This book helps readers identify feasible and morally plausible reforms of global institutional arrangements and international organizations.
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  49.  8
    Christian Barry, Michael Davis, Peter K. Dews, Aaron V. Garrett, Yusuf Has, Bill E. Lawson, Val Plumwood, Joshua Preiss, Jennifer C. Rubenstein & Avital Simhony (2003). Book Notes. [REVIEW] Ethics 113 (3):734-741.
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  50.  9
    Christian Barry (2002). Boundaries and Allegiances, Samuel Scheffler , 221 Pp., $29.95 Cloth. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 16 (1):167-172.
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  51. Christian Barry (2002). Book Review. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 16 (1).
     
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  52.  26
    Christian Barry & Kate Raworth (2002). Access to Medicines and the Rhetoric of Responsibility. Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):57–70.
    In Africa fewer than 50,000 people—less than 2 percent of the people in need—currently receive ARV therapy. These facts have elicited strongly divergent reactions, and views about the appropriate response to this crisis have varied widely.
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  53.  5
    Mira Johri & Christian Barry (2002). Health and Global Justice. Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):33-34.
    In a recent global survey commissioned for the Millennium Summit of the United Nations, people around the world consistently mentioned good health as what they most desired.
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  54.  5
    Christian Barry (2001). The Bounds of Justice, Onora O'Neill , 226 Pp., $54.95 Cloth, $19.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 15 (1):197-200.
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