Kristin Mickelson University of Minnesota, Morris
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  • Faculty, University of Minnesota, Morris
  • PhD, University of Colorado, Boulder, 2012.

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  1. Kristin Mickelson, The Zygote Argument Is Invalid--Now What?
    Alfred Mele’s Zygote Argument is widely considered to be among the most powerful arguments for free-will incompatibilism. In this paper, I explain how a common equivocation on the term “incompatibilism” has obscured the fact that the original Zygote Argument is invalid. I argue that if the original, diagnostic conclusion of the Zygote Argument is to be preserved, the argument must be supplemented with a best-explanation argument that identifies deterministic laws as menacing. By the same reasoning, it follows that every “diagnostic” (...)
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  2. Kristin Mickelson (2010). The Soft-Line Solution to Pereboom's Four-Case Argument. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):595-617.
    Derk Pereboom's Four-Case Argument is among the most famous and resilient manipulation arguments against compatibilism. I contend that its resilience is not a function of the argument's soundness but, rather, the ill-gotten gain from an ambiguity in the description of the causal relations found in the argument's foundational case. I expose this crucial ambiguity and suggest that a dilemma faces anyone hoping to resolve it. After a thorough search for an interpretation which avoids both horns of this dilemma, I conclude (...)
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  3. Kristin Mickelson, A Critique of Vihvelin's "Three-Fold Classification&Quot;.
    The standard definitions of “incompatibilism” and “compatibilism” are problematic because these definitions do not capture the robust metaphysical and explanatory commitments of the historical views associated with these terms. As a result, equivocation on these terms is commonplace and the dialectic of the free-will debate has been obscured. Kadri Vihvelin (2013, 2011, 2008) proposes that philosophers replace the standard taxonomy of free-will views with her “Three-fold Classification.” In this essay, I argue that Vihvelin’s proposed taxonomy is also untenable. Among other (...)
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  4. Kristin Mickelson, The Explanation-Based Taxonomy of Free-Will Views [Temporarily Unavailable].
    The standard definitions of terms such as ‘incompatibilism’ and ‘compatibilism’ are problematic because these definitions do not capture the robust metaphysical and explanatory commitments of the historical views associated with these terms. As a result of equivocation on such terms is commonplace and the dialectic of the free-will debate has been obscured. In this essay, I defend a new and more exhaustive taxonomy of free-will views, the “Explanation-based Taxonomy.” This new taxonomy avoids the problems of its predecessors, and gives philosophers (...)
     
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  5. Kristin Mickelson & Christian Lee, Redefining 'Determinism' [Temporarily Unavailable].
     
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