Felipe De Brigard Harvard University
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  • Postdoc, Harvard University
  • PhD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 2011.

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About me
I am a postdoctoral fellow at the Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory Lab in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. I work in philosophy of mind with an emphasis in cognitive psychology and neuroscience. My research focuses on the nature of memory and its relations to other cognitive faculties, in particular perception, imagination, attention and consciousness. I am also interested in the philosophy of neuroscience and moral psychology.
My works
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  1. Felipe De Brigard (forthcoming). Attention, Consciousness, and Commonsense. Journal of Consciousness Studies.
    The relation of dependency between consciousness and attention is, once again, a matter of heated debate among scientists and philosophers. There are at least three general views on the issue. First, there are those who suggest that attention is both necessary and sufficient for consciousness (e.g. Posner, 1994; Prinz, 2000, forthcoming). Second, there are those who suggest that even though attention is necessary for consciousness, it may not be sufficient (e.g. Moran & Desimone, 1984; Rensink et al., 1997; Merikle & (...)
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  2. Felipe De Brigard (2014). The Nature of Memory Traces. Philosophy Compass 9 (6):402-414.
    Memory trace was originally a philosophical term used to explain the phenomenon of remembering. Once debated by Plato, Aristotle, and Zeno of Citium, the notion seems more recently to have become the exclusive province of cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists. Nonetheless, this modern appropriation should not deter philosophers from thinking carefully about the nature of memory traces. On the contrary, scientific research on the nature of memory traces can rekindle philosopher's interest on this notion. With that general aim in mind, the (...)
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  3. Felipe De Brigard (2013). Is Memory for Remembering? Recollection as a Form of Episodic Hypothetical Thinking. Synthese 191 (2):1-31.
    Misremembering is a systematic and ordinary occurrence in our daily lives. Since it is commonly assumed that the function of memory is to remember the past, misremembering is typically thought to happen because our memory system malfunctions. In this paper I argue that not all cases of misremembering are due to failures in our memory system. In particular, I argue that many ordinary cases of misremembering should not be seen as instances of memory’s malfunction, but rather as the normal result (...)
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  4. Felipe De Brigard & William Brady (2013). The Effect of What We Think May Happen on Our Judgments of Responsibility. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (2):259-269.
    Recent evidence suggests that if a deterministic description of the events leading up to a morally questionable action is couched in mechanistic, reductionistic, concrete and/or emotionally salient terms, people are more inclined toward compatibilism than when those descriptions use non-mechanistic, non-reductionistic, abstract and/or emotionally neutral terms. To explain these results, it has been suggested that descriptions of the first kind are processed by a concrete cognitive system, while those of the second kind are processed by an abstract cognitive system. The (...)
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  5. Felipe De Brigard (2012). Influence of Outcome Valence in the Subjective Experience of Episodic Past, Future, and Counterfactual Thinking. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1085-1096.
  6. Felipe De Brigard (2012). Predictive Memory and the Surprising Gap. Frontiers in Psychology 3:420.
    Predictive Memory and the Surprising Gap.
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  7. Felipe De Brigard (2012). The Role of Attention in Conscious Recollection. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
    Most research on the relationship between attention and consciousness has been limited to perception. However, perceptions are not the only kinds of mental contents of which we can be conscious. An important set of conscious states that has not received proper treatment within this discussion is that of memories. This paper reviews compelling evidence indicating that attention may be necessary, but probably not sufficient, for conscious recollection. However, it is argued that unlike the case of conscious perception, the kind of (...)
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  8. K. Giovanello, F. De Brigard, J. Ford, D. Kaufer, J. Browndyke & K. Welsh-Bohmer (2012). Event-Related Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Changes During Relational Retrieval in Normal Aging and Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society 18:886-897.
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  9. F. de Brigard (2010). Consciousness, Attention and Commonsense. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (9-10):189-201.
    In a recent paper, Christopher Mole (2008) argued in favour of the view that, according to our commonsense psychology, while consciousness is necessary for attention, attention isn’t necessary for consciousness. In this paper I offer an argument against this view. More precisely, I offer an argument against the claim that, according to our commonsense psychology, consciousness is necessary for attention. However, I don’t claim it follows from this argument that commonsense has it the other way around, viz. that consciousness isn’t (...)
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  10. Felipe De Brigard (2010). If You Like It, Does It Matter If It's Real? Philosophical Psychology 23 (1):43-57.
    Most people's intuitive reaction after considering Nozick's experience machine thought-experiment seems to be just like his: we feel very little inclination to plug in to a virtual reality machine capable of providing us with pleasurable experiences. Many philosophers take this empirical fact as sufficient reason to believe that, more than pleasurable experiences, people care about “living in contact with reality.” Such claim, however, assumes that people's reaction to the experience machine thought-experiment is due to the fact that they value reality (...)
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  11. Felipe de Brigard & J. Prinz (2010). Attention and Consciousness. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews 1 (1):51-59.
    For the past three decades there has been a substantial amount of scientific evidence supporting the view that attention is necessary and sufficient for perceptual representations to become conscious (i.e., for there to be something that it is like to experience a representational perceptual state). This view, however, has been recently questioned on the basis of some alleged counterevidence. In this paper we survey some of the most important recent findings. In doing so, we have two primary goals. The first (...)
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  12. Hagop Sarkissian, Amita Chatterjee, Felipe De Brigard, Joshua Knobe, Shaun Nichols & Smita Sirker (2010). Is Belief in Free Will a Cultural Universal? Mind and Language 25 (3):346-358.
    Recent experimental research has revealed surprising patterns in people's intuitions about free will and moral responsibility. One limitation of this research, however, is that it has been conducted exclusively on people from Western cultures. The present paper extends previous research by presenting a cross-cultural study examining intuitions about free will and moral responsibility in subjects from the United States, Hong Kong, India and Colombia. The results revealed a striking degree of cross-cultural convergence. In all four cultural groups, the majority of (...)
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  13. Felipe de Brigard (2009). Guerrero del Amo, JA" Las dificultades del compatibilismo de Dennett", Thémata. Revista de filosofía 39 (2007): 97-103. Ideas y Valores 58 (141):262-268.
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  14. Felipe de Brigard (2009). Reseña de "Las dificultades del compatibilismo de Dennett, Thémata. Revista de filosofía 39" de Guerrero del Amo, J. A. Ideas y Valores 58 (141):262-268.
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  15. Felipe De Brigard (2009). The Origins of Meaning: Language in the Light of Evolution. Philosophical Psychology 22 (4):529 – 533.
  16. Felipe De Brigard, Eric Mandelbaum & David Ripley (2009). Responsibility and the Brain Sciences. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (5):511-524.
    Some theorists think that the more we get to know about the neural underpinnings of our behaviors, the less likely we will be to hold people responsible for their actions. This intuition has driven some to suspect that as neuroscience gains insight into the neurological causes of our actions, people will cease to view others as morally responsible for their actions, thus creating a troubling quandary for our legal system. This paper provides empirical evidence against such intuitions. Particularly, our studies (...)
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  17. Felipe de Brigard (2007). Prinz, Jesse J. Furnishing the Mind: Concepts and Their Perceptual Basis. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 358 P.(2002)[2004]. [REVIEW] Ideas y Valores 56 (133):163-168.
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