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  • PhD, Lancaster University, 2001.

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About me
I am an independent philosopher, with a Ph.D. but currently not in a university, working on Middle Way Philosophy. This is an alternative approach to objectivity and judgement which challenges a set of interconnected assumptions made in both analytic and continental traditions in the West. This approach was originally inspired by the Buddha's Middle Way, but I am not a scholar of Buddhism (or, any longer, a Buddhist) and work within the context of Western philosophical discussion, also drawing on evidence from psychology, cognitive science, and integrative practices. I have founded the Middle Way Society to work with others on the development and practice of Middle Way Philosophy: for more information please see http://www.middlewaysociety.org.
My works
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  1. Davin Bernstein, Robert Ellis & G. A. Ry Gisolo (forthcoming). N EWS and NOTES. Philosophy East and West.
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  2. Robert M. Ellis (2013). Middle Way Philosophy 2: The Integration of Desire. Lulu.
    An argument that there is a common pattern in conflict between desires and the dialectical integration of those conflicts, at both individual and socio-political levels. Philosophical, psychological, poltical and Buddhist approaches to integration are brought together here to show how the integration of desire contributes to moral objectivity.
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  3. Robert M. Ellis (2013). Middle Way Philosophy 3: The Integration of Meaning. Lulu.
    This third volume of the Middle Way Philosophy series applies the revolutionary view, taken from cognitive science, that meaning is found in our bodies rather than in a relationship between language and reality. Cognitive and emotive meaning cannot be separated. This approach reveals the basic error of the metaphysical views that depend on absolute cognitive meaning. It also provides the basis for an account of how we can integrate meaning. Each new time we connect an experience to a symbol we (...)
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  4. Robert M. Ellis (2012). Middle Way Philosophy 1: The Path of Objectivity. Lulu.
    The first of a planned series of 5 volumes on Middle Way Philosophy. Middle Way Philosophy was originally inspired by the Middle Way of the Buddha but is developed in an entirely Western context. It addresses the questions of objectivity, justification, facts and values, and the relationship of philosophy and psychology. It develops the concept of experiential adequacy to provide a non-metaphysical resolution of the dichotomy between absolutism and relativism in both facts and values.
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  5. Robert M. Ellis (2011). A New Buddhist Ethics. Lulu.com.
    This book is a survey of practical moral issues applying the Middle Way (as developed in 'A Theory of Moral Objectivity') as the basis of 'Buddhist' Ethics. No appeal is made to Buddhist traditions or scriptures, but instead the Middle Way is applied consistently as a universal philosophical and practical principle to suggest the direction of resolutions to moral debates. Practical ethics topics covered include sexual ethics, medical ethics, environmental ethics, animals, violence, the arts, scientific issues and political ethics.
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  6. Robert M. Ellis (2011). A Theory of Moral Objectivity. Lulu.com.
    An inter-disciplinary philosophical treatise (written as an accredited Ph.D. thesis) that attempts to establish a new approach to moral objectivity. Inspired by the Buddha's Middle Way, but arguing from first premises, it challenges widespread and interlinked assumptions in both analytic and continental philosophy, whilst drawing on both these traditions together with psychological, religious and historical evidence. The first section of the book provides a detailed critique of existing approaches to ethics in the Western tradition. The second half then puts forward (...)
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  7. Robert M. Ellis (2011). Truth on the Edge: A Brief Western Philosophy of the Middle Way. Lulu.com.
    This book is a briefer and updated account of the Middle Way Philosophy developed in 'A Theory of Moral Objectivity'. Its starting point is the argument that we are not justified in making any claims about truth, whether moral or scientific, but the idea of truth is still meaningful. Instead of making or denying metaphysical claims about truth, we need to think in terms of incrementally objective justification within experience. This standpoint is related to an account of objectivity as psychological (...)
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  8. Robert M. Ellis (2011). The Trouble with Buddhism. Lulu.com.
    This book is a philosophical critique of the Buddhist tradition (not a scholarly work about the Buddhist tradition), applying the standards of judgement developed in 'A Theory of Moral Objectivity'. It is argued that although the Buddhist tradition provides access to the insights of the Middle Way, many other aspects of Buddhist tradition are inconsistent with this central insight. The sources of justified belief in Buddhism, karma, conditionality, concepts of reality, monasticism and Buddhist ethics are all subjected to the same (...)
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  9. Robert Ellis (2004). Chipping Away at Competition. Knowledge, Technology, and Policy 17 (1):8-17.
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  10. Robert Ellis (2003). Conformity Versus Creativity? The Philosophers' Magazine 24 (24):45-48.
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  11. R. Ellis (2000). Jaak Panksepp: Affective Neuroscience. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (2):313-317.
  12. Robert Ellis (2000). Parfit and the Buddha: Identity and Identification Inreasons and Persons. Contemporary Buddhism 1 (1):91-106.
    (2000). Parfit and the buddha: Identity and identification in reasons and persons. Contemporary Buddhism: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 91-106. doi: 10.1080/14639940008573723.
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  13. Robert Ellis (1998). Storm The Eastern Front. The Philosophers' Magazine 2 (2):55-55.
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  14. R. Ellis (1997). The Fate of Place: A Philosophical History, by Edward Casey. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 28:302-304.
     
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  15. Robert Ellis (1997). Relativism and the Philosophy of Religious Education. The Philosophers' Magazine 1 (1):17-18.
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  16. Robert Ellis (1997). Revelation, Wisdom, and Learning From Religion. British Journal of Religious Education 19 (2):95-103.
    D.G Attfield's article "Learning from Religion" in BJRE 18:2 raises a number of difficulties in the treatment of truth claims in Religious Education. He argues that these claims should limit the acceptable goals of non-confessional R.E. to teaching about religion and not cross a threshold of faith-commitment beyond which a child may learn from religion. His arguments rest on a questionable understanding of religions as entirely defined by their irreconcilable revelations, which actually condemns R.E to an ineffectual relativism. Attfield also (...)
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  17. R. Ellis (1990). The Moral Significance of Hard Toil: Critique of a Common Intuition. Philosophical Forum 21 (3):343-358.
     
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