Catherine Wilson University of York, Oxford University
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  • Faculty, University of York
  • Graduate student, Oxford University
  • PhD, Princeton University, 1977.

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About me
I'm developing a project on the life sciences in the 18th century and Enlightenment political theory. I am also interested in the concept of 'the organism' in the philosophy of biology and its history. I am working on the pragmatics and semantics of moral discourse and the theory of internal reasons after Bernard Williams.
My works
143 items found.
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  1. G. A. Fielding, F. Mok, C. Wilson, C. W. Imrie & Dc Carter (forthcoming). Dna Polymerase Delta: A Second Eukaryotic Dna Replicase. Bioessays.
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  2. Catherine Wilson (forthcoming). Darwin and Nietzsche: Selection, Evolution, and Morality. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (2):354-370.
  3. Catherine Wilson (2015). The Doors of Perception and the Artist Within. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 89 (1):1-20.
    This paper discusses the significance for the philosophy of perception and aesthetics of certain productions of the ‘offline brain’. These are experienced in hypnagogic and other trance states, and in disease- or drug-induced hallucination. They bear a similarity to other visual patterns in nature, and reappear in human artistry, especially of the craft type. The reasons behind these resonances are explored, along with the question why we are disposed to find geometrical complexity and ‘supercolouration’ beautiful. The paper concludes with a (...)
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  4. Catherine Wilson (2014). Mach, Musil, and Modernism. The Monist 97 (1):138-155.
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  5. Catherine Wilson (2014). The Works of Lucy Hutchinson. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 105 (1):216-217.
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  6. C. Wilson (2013). Fiction and Emotion: Replies to My Critics. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):117-123.
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  7. C. Wilson (2013). Grief and the Poet. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):77-91.
    Poetry, drama and the novel present readers and viewers with emotionally significant situations that they often experience as moving, and their being so moved is one of the principal motivations for engaging with fictions. If emotions are considered as action-prompting beliefs about the environment, the appetite for sad or frightening drama and literature is difficult to explain, insofar nothing tragic or frightening is actually happening to the reader, and people do not normally enjoy being sad or frightened. The paper argues (...)
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  8. Catherine Wilson (2013). Darwin and Nietzsche. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (2):354-370.
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  9. Catherine Wilson (2012). Curiosity and Conciliation: A New Leibniz Biography. Modern Intellectual History 9 (2):409-421.
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  10. Desmond M. Clarke & Catherine Wilson (eds.) (2011). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. Oxford University Press.
    In this Handbook twenty-six leading scholars survey the development of philosophy between the middle of the sixteenth century and the early eighteenth century.
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  11. Catherine Wilson (2011). Moral Progress Without Moral Realism. Philosophical Papers 39 (1):97-116.
    This paper argues that we can acknowledge the existence of moral truths and moral progress without being committed to moral realism. Rather than defending this claim through the more familiar route of the attempted analysis of the ontological commitments of moral claims, I show how moral belief change for the better shares certain features with theoretical progress in the natural sciences. Proponents of the better theory are able to convince their peers that it is formally and empirically superior to its (...)
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  12. Catherine Wilson (2011). Moral Truth: Observational or Theoretical? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (1pt1):97-114.
    Moral properties are widely held to be response-dependent properties of actions, situations, events and persons. There is controversy as to whether the putative response-dependence of these properties nullifies any truth-claims for moral judgements, or rather supports them. The present paper argues that moral judgements are more profitably compared with theoretical judgements in the natural sciences than with the judgements of immediate sense-perception. The notion of moral truth is dependent on the notion of moral knowledge, which in turn is best understood (...)
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  13. Catherine Wilson (2011). Realism and Relativism in Ethics. In Desmond M. Clarke & Catherine Wilson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. OUP Oxford
     
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  14. Catherine Wilson (2010). Review of David Cunning, Argument and Persuasion in Descartes' Meditations. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (10).
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  15. Catherine Wilson (2010). Some Motives and Incentives to the Study of Natural Philosophy. In Claus Zittel & Moritz Epple (eds.), Science as Cultural Practice: Vol. I: Cultures and Politics of Research From the Early Modern Period to the Age of Extremes. Akademie Verlag 13-30.
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  16. Catherine Wilson (2010). The Explanation of Consciousness and the Interpretation of Philosophical Texts. In Peter K. Machamer & Gereon Wolters (eds.), Interpretation: Ways of Thinking About the Sciences and the Arts. University of Pittsburgh Press
     
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  17. Catherine Wilson (2009). 15 Epicureanism in Early Modern Philosophy. In James Warren (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism. Cambridge University Press 266.
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  18. Catherine Wilson (2009). Epicureanism in the Early Modern Period. In James Warren (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism. Cambridge University Press
     
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  19. Catherine Wilson (2009). Review of Daniel Callcut (Ed.), Reading Bernard Williams. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (10).
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  20. Catherine Wilson (2009). Williams. In Christopher Belshaw & Gary Kemp (eds.), 12 Modern Philosophers. Wiley-Blackwell
     
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  21. Catherine Wilson (2008). Disgrace : Bernard Williams and J.M. Coetzee. In Garry Hagberg (ed.), Art and Ethical Criticism. Blackwell Pub. 144--162.
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  22. Catherine Wilson (2008). Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity. Oxford University Press.
    This landmark study examines the role played by the rediscovery of the writings of the ancient atomists, Epicurus and Lucretius, in the articulation of the major philosophical systems of the seventeenth century, and, more broadly, their influence on the evolution of natural science and moral and political philosophy. The target of sustained and trenchant philosophical criticism by Cicero, and of opprobrium by the Christian Fathers of the early Church, for its unflinching commitment to the absence of divine supervision and the (...)
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  23. Catherine Wilson, Kant and Leibniz. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  24. Catherine Wilson (2008). Review of Alan Thomas (Ed.), Bernard Williams. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (5).
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  25. Catherine Wilson (2008). The Enlightenment Philosopher as Social Critic. Intellectual History Review 18 (3):413-425.
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  26. Catherine Wilson (2008). What Do Simple Folks Know? Commentary on the Papers of Adler, Arikha, Martensen, Origgi, and Stoler. Philosophical Forum 39 (3):363-372.
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  27. Monte Ransome Johnson & Catherine Wilson (2007). Lucretius and the History of Science. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press
    An overview of the influence of Lucretius poem On the Nature of Things (De Rerum Natura) on the renaissance and scientific revolution of the seventeenth century, and an examination of its continuing influence over physical atomism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
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  28. Monte Johnson & Catherine Wilson (2007). Pt. 2. Themes. Lucretius and the History of Science. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press
     
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  29. Catherine Wilson (2007). Evolutionary Ethics. In Mohan Matthen & Christopher Stephens (eds.), Philosophy of Biology. Elsevier 219.
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  30. Catherine Wilson (2007). Robert Hooke: Tercentennial Studies. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 98:626-627.
  31. Catherine Wilson (2007). The Moral Epistemology of Locke's Essay. In Lex Newman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Cambridge University Press
  32. Catherine Wilson (2007). Two Opponents of Material Atomism: Cavendish and Leibniz. In P. Phemister & S. Brown (eds.), Leibniz and the English-Speaking World. Springer 35-50.
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  33. Catherine Wilson (2007). Two Opponents of Material Atomism. In P. Phemister & S. Brown (eds.), Leibniz and the English-Speaking World. Springer 35--50.
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  34. C. Wilson (2006). Review: The Moral Demands of Affluence. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (460):1122-1126.
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  35. Catherine Wilson (2006). Commentary on Galen Strawson. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (s 10-11):177-183.
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  36. Catherine Wilson (2006). Kant and the Speculative Sciences of Origins. In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press
  37. Catherine Wilson (2006). Review of Victoria Kahn, Neil Saccamano, Daniela Coli (Eds.), Politics and the Passions, 1500-1850. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (11).
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  38. Glenn A. Hartz & Catherine Wilson (2005). Ideas and Animals: The Hard Problem of Leibnizian Metaphysics. Studia Leibnitiana 37 (1):1 - 19.
    Die Ansicht, dass Leibniz urn 1700 oder einige Zeit danach ein überzeugter Idealist war oder wurde, der allein an die Realität der Geister und ihrer Ideen glaubte, hält sich merkwürdigerweise in der neueren Sekundärliteratur. In diesem Beitrag beurteilen wir die Textgrundlage für diese Behauptung nach von uns für solide gehaltenen Kriterien einer historischen Interpretation, wobei sich die Behauptung unserer Ansicht nach als unzureichend erweist. Obwohl Leibniz zur Überzeugung gelangt war, dass wirkliche "Atome" der Natur keine Ausdehnung hätten, war er sein (...)
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  39. C. Wilson (2005). Thomas Holden: The Architecture of Matter: Galileo to Kant. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (3).
     
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  40. Catherine Wilson (2005). Claudia Card, Ed., The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir:The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Ethics 115 (2):389-393.
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  41. Catherine Wilson (2005). 'Compossibility, Expression, Accommodation. In Donald Rutherford J. A. Cover (ed.), Leibniz: Nature and Freedom. Oxford University Press 108--20.
     
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  42. Catherine Wilson (2005). Is the History of Philosophy Good for Philosophy? In Tom Sorell & G. A. J. Rogers (eds.), Analytic Philosophy and History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press
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  43. Catherine Wilson (2005). What is the Importance of Descartes’s Meditation Six? Philosophica 76.
    In this essay, I argu e that Descartes considered his theory that the body is an inn ervated machine – in which the soul is situated – to be his most original contribution to philosophy. His ambition to prove the immortality of the soul was very poorly realized, a predictable outcome, insofar as his aims were ethical, not theological. His dualism accordingly requires reassessment.
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  44. Sandra Lee Bartky, Paul Benson, Sue Campbell, Claudia Card, Robin S. Dillon, Jean Harvey, Karen Jones, Charles W. Mills, James Lindemann Nelson, Margaret Urban Walker, Rebecca Whisnant & Catherine Wilson (2004). Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Moral psychology studies the features of cognition, judgement, perception and emotion that make human beings capable of moral action. Perspectives from feminist and race theory immensely enrich moral psychology. Writers who take these perspectives ask questions about mind, feeling, and action in contexts of social difference and unequal power and opportunity. These essays by a distinguished international cast of philosophers explore moral psychology as it connects to social life, scientific studies, and literature.
     
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  45. Catherine Wilson (2004). John Locke, Selected Correspondence Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (6):425-428.
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  46. Catherine Wilson (2004). John Locke, Selected Correspondence. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 24:425-428.
     
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  47. Catherine Wilson (2004). Love of God and Love of Creatures: The Masham-Astell Debate. History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (3):281 - 298.
  48. Catherine Wilson (2004). Moral Animals: Ideals and Constraints in Moral Theory. Oxford University Press.
    In Moral Animals, Catherine Wilson develops a theory of morality based on two fundamental premises: first that moral progress implies the evolution of moral ideals involving restraint and sacrifice; second that human beings are outfitted by nature with selfish motivations, intentions, and ambitions that place constraints on what morality can demand of them. Normative claims, she goes on to show, can be understood as projective hypotheses concerning the conduct of realistically-described nonideal agents in preferred fictional worlds. Such claims differ from (...)
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  49. Catherine Wilson (2004). Report on the 2004 Montreal Nouveaux Essais Conference. The Leibniz Review 14:173-174.
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  50. Catherine Wilson (2004). Simone de Beauvoir and Human Dignity. In Emily R. Grosholz (ed.), The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir. Clarendon Press
     
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  51. Catherine Wilson (2004). The Preferences of Women. In Peggy DesAutels & Margaret Urban Walker (eds.), Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield 99.
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  52. Catherine Wilson (2003). A Humean Argument for Benevolence to Strangers. The Monist 86 (3):454-468.
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  53. Catherine Wilson (2003). Capability and Language in the Novels of Tarjei Vesaas. Philosophy and Literature 27 (1):21-39.
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  54. Catherine Wilson (2003). Descartes's Meditations: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    In this new introduction to a classic philosophical text, Catherine Wilson examines the arguments of Descartes' famous Meditations, the book which launched modern philosophy. Drawing on the reinterpretations of Descartes' thought of the past twenty-five years, she shows how Descartes constructs a theory of the mind, the body, nature, and God from a premise of radical uncertainty. She discusses in detail the historical context of Descartes' writings and their relationship to early modern science, and at the same time she introduces (...)
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  55. Catherine Wilson (2003). Margaret Cavendish, Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (5):325-327.
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  56. Catherine Wilson (2003). Margaret Cavendish, Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 23:325-327.
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  57. Catherine Wilson (2003). Philosopher: A Kind of Life. Philosophy 78 (4):541-552.
    This is an essay review of Ted Honderich's recently published autobiography. Treating the work as both a study of philosophical and political culture in the second half of the twentieth century and as an exercise in self-evaluation, the reviewer discusses the problems of truth and explanation in narrative and the issues of professional and sexual morality raised by the narrative. Honderich's account is assessed as credible, illuminating, and well-written, even as questions are raised concerning the consistency of his political beliefs.
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  58. Catherine Wilson (2003). Philosopher: A Kind of Life By Ted Honderich Routledge: London and New York, 2001. ISBN 0-415-23697-5. Pp. 441+ X. Philosophy 78:541.
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  59. Catherine Wilson (2003). The Role of a Merit Principle in Distributive Justice. Journal of Ethics 7 (3):277-314.
    The claim that the level of well-beingeach enjoys ought to be to some extent afunction of individuals'' talents, efforts,accomplishments, and other meritoriousattributes faces serious challenge from bothegalitarians and libertarians, but also fromskeptics, who point to the poor historicalrecord of attempted merit assays and theubiquity of attribution biases arising fromlimited sweep, misattribution, custom andconvention, and mimicry. Yet merit-principlesare connected with reactive attitudes andinnate expectations, giving them some claim torecognition and there is a widespread beliefthat their use indirectly promotes thewell-being of all. (...)
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  60. Christian Helmut Wenzel, Catherine Wilson, Andrew Levine & David Ingram (2002). Review of Herbert Marcuse, Douglas Kellner Ed., Towards a Critical Theory of Society: The Collected Papers of Herbert Marcuse: Volume Two. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (1).
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  61. C. Wilson (2002). The Cambridge Companion to Malebranche. Philosophical Review 111 (1):108-113.
    The French philosopher and theologian Nicholas Malebranche was one of the most important thinkers of the early modern period. A bold and unorthodox thinker, he tried to synthesize the new philosophy of Descartes with the religious Platonism of St. Augustine. This is the first collection of essays to address Malebranche's thought comprehensively and systematically. There are chapters devoted to Malebranche's metaphysics, his doctrine of the soul, his epistemology, the celebrated debate with Arnauld, his philosophical method, his occasionalism and theory of (...)
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  62. Catherine Wilson (2002). Les Modèles du Vivant de Descartes À Leibniz. The Leibniz Review 12:123-127.
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  63. Catherine Wilson (2002). Review: Losonsky, Enlightenment and Action From Descartes to Kant: Passionate Thought. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (1).
  64. Catherine Wilson (2002). The Biological Basis and Ideational Superstructure of Ethics. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26:211-244.
     
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  65. Catherine Wilson (2001). Leibniz. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  66. Catherine Wilson (2001). Our Only Star and Compass: Locke and the Struggle for Political Rationality. [REVIEW] Enlightenment and Dissent 20:181-184.
     
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  67. Catherine Wilson (2001). Prospects for Non-Cognitivism. Inquiry 44 (3):291 – 314.
    This essay offers a defence of the non-cognitivist approach to the interpretation of moral judgments as disguised imperatives corresponding to social rules. It addresses the body of criticism that faced R. M. Hare, and that currently faces moral anti-realists, on two levels, by providing a full semantic analysis of evaluative judgments and by arguing that anti-realism is compatible with moral aspiration despite the non-existence of obligations as the externalist imagines them. A moral judgment consists of separate descriptive and prescriptive components (...)
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  68. Catherine Wilson (2001). Response to Ohad Nachtomy's “Individuals, Worlds, and Relations. The Leibniz Review 11:125-129.
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  69. Catherine Wilson (2001). The Bounds of Agency. Journal of Philosophy 98 (1):47-54.
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  70. Catherine Wilson (2001). Thomas Kuhn: A Philosophical History for Our Times by Steve Fuller. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 92:436-437.
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  71. Catherine Wilson (2000). Descartes and the Corporeal Mind: Some Implications of the Regius Affair. In John Schuster, Stephen Gaukroger & John Sutton (eds.), Descartes' Natural Philosophy. Routledge 659--79.
     
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  72. Catherine Wilson (2000). How to Connect with the Past. Metascience 9 (2):203-226.
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  73. Catherine Wilson (2000). Leibniz and Clarke: A Study of Their Correspondence by Ezio Vailati. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 91:155-156.
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  74. Catherine Wilson (2000). Plenitude and Compossibility in Leibniz. The Leibniz Review 10:1-20.
    Leibniz entertained the idea that, as a set of “striving possibles” competes for existence, the largest and most perfect world comes into being. The paper proposes 8 criteria for a Leibniz-world. It argues that a) there is no algorithm e.g., one involving pairwise compossibility-testing that can produce even possible Leibniz-worlds; b) individual substances presuppose completed worlds; c) the uniqueness of the actual world is a matter of theological preference, not an outcome of the assembly-process; and d) Goedel’s theorem implies that (...)
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  75. Catherine Wilson (2000). The Biological Basis and Ideational Superstructure of Morality. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (Supplement):211-244.
    (2000). The Biological Basis and Ideational Superstructure of Morality. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 30, Supplementary Volume 26: Moral Epistemology Naturalized, pp. 210-244.
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  76. C. Wilson (1999). Introduction: Social Inequality: Rousseau in Retrospect. Canadian Journal of Philosophy. Supplementary Volume 25 (Supplement):1-30.
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  77. Catherine Wilson (1999). Introduction. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (Supplement):1-30.
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  78. Catherine Wilson (1999). Margaret Dauler Wilson. The Leibniz Review 9:1-15.
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  79. Catherine Wilson (1999). Picturing Knowledge: Historical and Philosophical Problems Concerning the Use of Art in Science Brian Baigrie, Editor Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996, Xxiv + 389 Pp., $80.00, $24.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (03):664-.
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  80. D. Pimentel, C. Wilson, C. McCullum, R. Huang, P. Dwen, J. Flack, Q. Tran, T. Saltman & B. Cliff (1998). Separating Feelings From Knowledge-Reply. BioScience 48 (5):341-341.
     
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  81. Robin Robbins, Howard Hotson, David Yandell, Catherine Wilson, Giambattista Gori & James Somerville (1998). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 6 (1):127-142.
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  82. C. Wilson (1998). J. Cottingham, Reason, Will and Sensation. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 6:135-137.
     
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  83. Catherine Wilson (1998). Natural Domination: A Reply to Michael Levin. Philosophy 73 (4):573-592.
    The paper is adressed to Michael Levin's recent Philosophy article ‘Natural Submission, Aristotle on.’ Levin argues that rule by the naturally dominant is for the best and that the naturally submissive ought to accept it as just and even inevitable. I point out some confusions in his attempt to link merit-conferring traits in individuals with social and political dominance and question his conceptions of human welfare, inferiority, and criminality. Certain combinations of competence and forcefulness arise in real-world settings, and they (...)
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  84. Catherine Wilson (1998). Savagery and the Supersensible: Kant's Universalism in Historical Context. History of European Ideas 24 (4-5):315-330.
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  85. Richard Arthur, Christia Mercer, Justin Smith & Catherine Wilson (1997). Kontinuitaet Und Mechanismus. The Leibniz Review 7:25-64.
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  86. Catherine Wilson (1997). Leibniz and the Animalcula. In M. A. Stewart (ed.), Studies in Seventeenth-Century European Philosophy. Oxford University Press 153--76.
     
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  87. Catherine Wilson (1997). Motion, Sensation, and the Infinite: The Lasting Impression of Hobbes on Leibniz. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (2):339 – 351.
  88. Catherine Wilson (1997). Naomi Zack, Bachelors of Science: Seventeenth-Century Identity, Then and Now Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (4):303-305.
  89. Catherine Wilson (1997). Theological Foundations for Modern Science? Dialogue 36 (03):597-.
    The paper is a critical notice of Margaret Osler, "Divine Will and the Mechanical Philosophy". Criticism focuses on Osler's claim that theological voluntarism and intellectualism and associated ideas about the necessity of physical laws and the certainty of scientific beliefs provide an underlying framework for understanding Gassendi's and Descartes's natural philosophies.
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  90. Catherine Wilson (1996). Donald Rutherford, Leibniz and the Rational Order of Nature Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 16 (4):287-289.
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  91. Catherine Wilson (1996). Donald Rutherford, Leibniz and the Rational Order of Nature. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 16:287-289.
     
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  92. Catherine Wilson (1996). Instruments and Ideologies: The Social Construction of Knowledge and Its Critics. American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (2):167 - 181.
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  93. C. Wilson (1995). Up at the Fork of the Creek: In Search of American Populism. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1995 (104):77-88.
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  94. Catherine Wilson (1995). On Imlay's "Berkeley and Action". In Robert G. Muehlmann (ed.), Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays. The Pennsylvania State University Press
  95. Catherine Wilson (1995). The Invisible World Early Modern Philosophy and the Invention of the Microscope. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  96. Catherine Wilson (1995). 13 The Reception of Leibniz in the Eighteenth Century. In Nicholas Jolley (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Leibniz. Cambridge University Press 442.
  97. C. Wilson (1994). Elizabeth Wolgast, Ethics of an Artificial Person: Lost Responsibility in Professions and Organizations. Radical Philosophy 66.
     
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  98. Catherine Wilson (1994). Berkeley and the Microworld. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 76 (1):37-64.
  99. Catherine Wilson (1994). Ethics of an Artificial Person: Lost Responsibility in Professions and Organizations. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 66.
     
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  100. Catherine Wilson (1994). Hide Ishiguro., Leibniz's Philosophy of Logic and Language. International Studies in Philosophy 26 (2):128-129.
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  101. Catherine Wilson (1994). Leibniz and the Logic of Life. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 48 (188):237-253.
     
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  102. Catherine Wilson (1994). Reply to Cover's 1993 Review of Leibniz's Metaphysics. The Leibniz Review 4:5-8.
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  103. Catherine Wilson (1993). Constancy, Emergence, and Illusions: Obstacles to a Naturalistic Theory of Vision. In Causation in Early Modern Philosophy. University Park: Penn St University Press
     
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  104. Catherine Wilson (1993). Causation in Early Modern Philosophy. University Park: Penn St University Press.
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  105. Catherine Wilson (1993). Critical Notice. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):661-674.
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  106. Catherine Wilson (1993). Enthusiasm and its Critics: Historical and Modern Perspectives. History of European Ideas 17 (4):461-478.
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  107. Catherine Wilson (1993). G.W. Leibniz, De Summa Rerum: Metaphysical Papers 1675-1676. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 13:40-42.
     
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  108. Catherine Wilson (1993). Interaction with the Reader in Kant's Transcendental Theory of Method. History of Philosophy Quarterly 10 (1):83 - 97.
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  109. Catherine Wilson (1993). Leibniz and Arnauld. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):661-674.
  110. Catherine Wilson (1993). On Some Alleged Limitations to Moral Endeavor. Journal of Philosophy 60 (6):275-289.
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  111. Catherine Wilson (1993). The Fold. The Leibniz Review 3:1-2.
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  112. Catherine Wilson (1992). Hipparchia’s Choice. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 62.
  113. Catherine Wilson (1992). How Did the Dinosaurs Die Out? How Did the Poets Survive? Radical Philosophy 62:20-6.
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  114. Catherine Wilson (1992). Leibniz's Metaphysics: A Historical and Comparative Study. Philosophical Review 101 (4):853-855.
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  115. Catherine Wilson & Tony Skillen (1992). Replies to Richard Rorty’s ‘Feminism and Pragmatism’: 1. How Did the Dinosaurs Die Out? How Did the Poets Survive? 2. Richard Rorty: Knight Errant. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 62.
     
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  116. Catherine Wilson (1991). Leibniz and Strawson. International Studies in Philosophy 23 (3):99-100.
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  117. Catherine Wilson (1991). What is Identity? Review of Metaphysics 44 (3):663-664.
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  118. Catherine Wilson (1990). Michael R. Matthews, Ed., The Scientific Background to Modern Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 10 (6):243-244.
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  119. Catherine Wilson (1989). Descartes: The Probable and the Certain. History of European Ideas 10 (3):384-385.
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  120. Catherine Wilson (1989). Leibniz's Metaphysics. Princeton Up.
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  121. Catherine Wilson (1989). Subjectivity and Representation in Descartes: The Origins of Modernity. History of European Ideas 10 (3):387-389.
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  122. C. Wilson (1988). Descartes's Gambit Peter J. Markie (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1986), 278 Pp., $30.25, Cloth. [REVIEW] History of European Ideas 9 (6):741-742.
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  123. Catherine Wilson (1988). Descartes's Gambit. History of European Ideas 9 (6):741-742.
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  124. Catherine Wilson (1988). Edward Craig, The Mind of God and the Works of Man Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 8 (7):254-257.
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  125. Catherine Wilson (1988). Edward Craig, The Mind of God and the Works of Man. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 8:254-257.
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  126. Catherine Wilson (1988). Visual Surface and Visual Symbol: The Microscope and the Occult in Early Modern Science. Journal of the History of Ideas 49 (1):85.
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  127. Catherine Wilson & Christiane Schildknecht (1988). The Cogito Meant 'No More Philosophy': Valéry's Descartes. History of European Ideas 9 (1):47-62.
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  128. Catherine Wilson (1987). De Ipsa Natura. Sources of Leibniz's Doctrines of Force, Activity and Natural Law. Studia Leibnitiana 19 (2):148-172.
    Leibniz beschreibt sein philosophisches Anliegen oft als Versuch, bestimmte Formen, die von den modernen Philosophen verbannt waren, wieder herzustellen. Dieser Aufsatz erörtert den historischen Gang dieser Verbannung und Leibniz' Bemühen um eine Rehabilitierung der Begriffe Natur, Form und Kraft, wobei er jedoch okkulte, “barbarische” und überflüssige Zutaten zur Naturphilosophie vermeidet.
     
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  129. Catherine Wilson (1987). De Ipsa Natura: Leibniz on Substance, Force and Activity. Studia Leibnitiana 19:148.
     
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  130. Catherine Wilson (1987). K. Okruhlik and JR Brown, Eds., The Natural Philosophy of Leibniz Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 7 (1):11-13.
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  131. Catherine Wilson (1987). K. Okruhlik And J.R. Brown, Eds., The Natural Philosophy Of Leibniz. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 7:11-13.
     
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  132. Catherine Wilson (1986). Sämtliche Schriften Und Briefe by G. W. Leibniz. Journal of Philosophy 83 (7):395-398.
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  133. Catherine Wilson (1984). Morality and the Self in Robert Musil's The Perfecting of a Love. Philosophy and Literature 8 (2):222-235.
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  134. Catherine Wilson (1983). Literature and Knowledge. Philosophy 58 (226):489 - 496.
    There is probably no subject in the philosophy of art which has prompted more impassioned theorizing than the question of the ‘cognitive value’ of works of art. ‘In the end’, one influential critic has stated, ‘I do not distinguish between science and art except as regards method. Both provide us with a view of reality and both are indispensable to a complete understanding of the universe.’ If a man is not prepared to distinguish between science and art one may well (...)
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  135. Catherine Wilson (1983). Leibnizian Optimism. Journal of Philosophy 80 (11):765-783.
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  136. Catherine Wilson (1983). Leibnizian Optimism. Journal of Philosophy 80 (11):765-783.
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  137. Catherine Wilson (1983). Peter Loptson, Ed., Anne Conway: The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 3 (6):292-296.
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  138. Catherine Wilson (1982). Illusion and Representation. British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (3):211-221.
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  139. Catherine Wilson (1982). Leibniz and Atomism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 13 (3):175-199.
  140. Catherine Wilson (1982). Nicholas Wolterstorff, Works and Worlds of Art Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 2 (1):39-43.
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  141. Catherine Wilson (1982). Nicholas Wolterstorff, Works and Worlds of Art. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 2:39-43.
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  142. Catherine Wilson (1980). Self-Deception and Psychological Realism. Philosophical Investigations 3 (4):47-60.
    Philosophers interested in the "paradox of self-Deception" have argued that self-Deception either (a) does not occur; (b) occurs but is unintelligible; or (c) can be explained by reference to sub-Components of a single personality. I argue that self-Deception can be explained as a variety of weakness of the will, Without the realist's mythology of dual or triple selves.
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  143. Catherine Wilson (1978). Cognitivism's Contributions: Some Questions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (2):253.
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