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  1. M. Davies (forthcoming). Externalism and Perceptual Content. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society.
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  2. M. Davies (forthcoming). The Hesiodic Catalogue of Women. Classical Review.
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  3. S. Brannan, R. Campbell, M. Davies, V. English, R. Mussell & J. C. Sheather (2014). Ethics Briefing. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (1):69-70.
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  4. Anne M. Aimola Davies, Stephen Waterman, Rebekah C. White & Martin Davies (2013). When You Fail to See What You Were Told to Look For: Inattentional Blindness and Task Instructions. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):221-230.
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  5. Anne M. Aimola Davies, Rebekah C. White & Martin Davies (2013). Spatial Limits on the Nonvisual Self-Touch Illusion and the Visual Rubber Hand Illusion: Subjective Experience of the Illusion and Proprioceptive Drift. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):613-636.
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  6. Martin Davies (2013). Computer-Aided Argument Mapping and the Teaching of Critical Thinking. Inquiry 27 (3):16-28.
    Part I of this paper outlined the three standard approaches to the teaching of critical thinking: the normative (or philosophical), cognitive psychology, and educational taxonomy approaches. The paper contrasted these with the visualisation approach; in particular, computer-aided argument mapping (CAAM), and presented a detailed account of the CAAM methodology and a theoretical justification for its use. This part develops further support for CAAM. A case is made that CAAM improves critical thinking because it minimises the cognitive burden of prose and (...)
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  7. Martin Davies, Sophie Brannan, Eleanor Chrispin, Veronica English, Rebecca Mussell & Julian C. Sheather (2013). Ethics Briefing. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):413-414.
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  8. Rebekah C. White, Anne M. Aimola Davies & Martin Davies (2011). Two Hands Are Better Than One: A New Assessment Method and a New Interpretation of the Non-Visual Illusion of Self-Touch. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):956-964.
  9. Rebekah C. White, Anne M. Aimola Davies & Martin Davies (2011). Two Hands Are Better Than One: A New Assessment Method and a New Interpretation of the Non-Visual Illusion of Self-Touch. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):956-964.
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  10. Martin Davies (2010). Double Dissociation: Understanding its Role in Cognitive Neuropsychology. Mind and Language 25 (5):500-540.
    The paper makes three points about the role of double dissociation in cognitive neuropsychology. First, arguments from double dissociation to separate modules work by inference to the best, not the only possible, explanation. Second, in the development of computational cognitive neuropsychology, the contribution of connectionist cognitive science has been to broaden the range of potential explanations of double dissociation. As a result, the competition between explanations, and the characteristic features of the assessment of theories against the criteria of probability and (...)
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  11. Rebekah C. White, Anne M. Aimola Davies, Terri J. Halleen & Martin Davies (2010). Tactile Expectations and the Perception of Self-Touch: An Investigation Using the Rubber Hand Paradigm. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):505-519.
  12. S. Brannan, M. Davies, V. English, R. Mussell, J. Sheather, E. Chrispin & A. Sommerville (2009). Ethics Briefings. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):63-64.
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  13. Martin Davies (2009). And Two Epistemic Projects. In Ian Ravenscroft (ed.), Minds, Ethics, and Conditionals: Themes From the Philosophy of Frank Jackson. Oxford University Press. 337.
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  14. Martin Davies (2009). Two Purposes of Arguing and Two Epistemic Projects. In Ian Ravenscroft (ed.), Minds, Ethics, and Conditionals: Themes From the Philosophy of Frank Jackson. Oup Oxford.
  15. Martin Davies (2008). Consciousness and Explanation. In Lawrence Weiskrantz & Martin Davies (eds.), Frontiers of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
     
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  16. Lawrence Weiskrantz & Martin Davies (eds.) (2008). Frontiers of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    In recent years consciousness has become a significant area of study in the cognitive sciences. The Frontiers of Consciousness is a major interdisciplinary exploration of consciousness. The book stems from the Chichele lectures held at All Souls College in Oxford, and features contributions from a 'who's who' of authorities from both philosophy and psychology. The result is a truly interdisciplinary volume, which tackles some of the biggest and most impenetrable problems in consciousness. The book includes chapters considering the apparent explanatory (...)
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  17. J. Currie, A. Damasio, J. Danckert, C. Darwin, A. S. David, M. Davies, B. Davis, J. Decety, R. C. DeCharmes & K. Delmeire (2005). Crick, F. 222. In Helena De Preester & Veroniek Knockaert (eds.), Body Image and Body Schema. John Benjamins Publishing Company. 329.
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  18. Martin Davies (2005). An Approach to the Philosophy of Cognitive Science. In Frank Jackson & Michael A. Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Analytic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Expanded version of a chapter to appear in The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Analytic Philosophy, edited by Frank Jackson and Michael Smith (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005).
     
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  19. Martin Davies (2005). Cognitive Science. In Frank Jackson & Michael Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press New York.
    The so-called ‘cognitive revolution’ (Gardner, 1985) in American psychology owed much to developments in adjacent disciplines, especially theoretical linguistics and computer science. Indeed, the cognitive revolution brought forth, not only a change in the conception of psychology, but also an inter-disciplinary approach to understanding the mind, involving philosophy, anthropology and neuroscience along with computer science, linguistics and psychology. Many commentators agree in dating the conception of this inter-disciplinary approach, cognitive science, to 11 September 1956, the second day of a symposium (...)
     
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  20. Martin Davies, Anne Aimola Davies & Max Coltheart (2005). Anosognosia and the Two-Factor Theory of Delusions. Mind and Language 20 (2):241-57.
    Anosognosia is literally ‘unawareness of or failure to acknowledge one’s hemi- plegia or other disability’ (OED). Etymology would suggest the meaning ‘lack of knowledge of disease’ so that anosognosia would include any denial of impairment, such as denial of blindness (Anton’s syndrome). But Babinski, who introduced the term in 1914, applied it only to patients with hemiplegia who fail to acknowledge their paralysis. Most commonly, this is failure to acknowledge paralysis of the left side of the body following damage to (...)
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  21. Martin Davies (2004). Aunty's Argument and Armchair Knowledge. In J.M. Larrazabal & L.A Perez Miranda (eds.), Language, Knowledge, and Representation. Kluwer.
    In my contribution to the Proceedings of the First International Colloquium on Cognitive Science, held in Donostia (San Sebasti.
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  22. Martin Davies (2004). Epistemic Entitlement, Warrant Transmission and Easy Knowledge. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 78 (1):213–245.
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  23. Martin Davies (2004). Reference, Contingency, and the Two-Dimensional Framework. Philosophical Studies 118 (1-2):83-131.
    I review and reconsider some of the themes of ‘Two notions of necessity’ (Davies and Humberstone, 1980) and attempt to reach a deeper understanding and appreciation of Gareth Evans’s reflections (in ‘Reference and contingency’, 1979) on both modality and reference. My aim is to plot the relationships between the notions of necessity that Humberstone and I characterised in terms of operators in two-dimensional modal logic, the notions of superficial and deep necessity that Evans himself described, and the epistemic notion of (...)
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  24. Martin Davies & Daniel Stoljar (2004). Introduction. Philosophical Studies 118 (1-2):1-10.
    The two-dimensional semantic framework, with its two-dimensional matrices of truth values, was developed for tense logic by Frank Vlach (1973), building on work by Hans Kamp (1971), and for modal logic by Lennart Åqvist (1973), Krister Segerberg (1973), and Bas van Fraassen (1977). Other antecedents of the contemporary use of the framework are found in formal work on contextdependence by Richard Montague (1968) and David Lewis (1970) and especially in David Kaplan’s distinction between character and content in ‘Demonstratives’ (published in (...)
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  25. Crispin Wright & Martin Davies (2004). On Epistemic Entitlement. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 78:167 - 245.
    [Crispin Wright] Two kinds of epistemological sceptical paradox are reviewed and a shared assumption, that warrant to accept a proposition has to be the same thing as having evidence for its truth, is noted. 'Entitlement', as used here, denotes a kind of rational warrant that counter-exemplifies that identification. The paper pursues the thought that there are various kinds of entitlement and explores the possibility that the sceptical paradoxes might receive a uniform solution if entitlement can be made to reach sufficiently (...)
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  26. J. Brookman, M. Cieri, C. Peeps, M. Davies, N. Naffine, W. McElroy, L. Kuo, T. Mansoor, A. Morris & T. O’Donnell (2003). Anderson, E., Judging Bertha Wilson, Law as Large as Life (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2001). Aristodemou, M., Law and Literature (Oxford: OUP, 2000). Beveridge, F., Nott, S. And Stephen, K., Eds., Making Women Count: Integrating Gender Into Law and Policy Making (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2000). [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 11:117-118.
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  27. Max Coltheart & Martin Davies (2003). Inference and Explanation in Cognitive Neuropsychology. Cortex 39 (1):188-191.
    The question posed by Dunn and Kirsner (D&K) is an instance of a more general one: What can we infer from data? One answer, if we are talking about logically valid deductive inference, is that we cannot infer theories from data. A theory is supposed to explain the data and so cannot be a mere summary of the data to be explained. The truth of an explanatory theory goes beyond the data and so is never logically guaranteed by the data. (...)
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  28. Martin Davies (2003). Externalism, Self-Knowledge and Transmission of Warrant. In Maria J. Frapolli & E. Romero (eds.), Meaning, Basic Self-Knowledge, and Mind. Csli.
    Externalism about some mental property, M, is the thesis that whether a person (or other physical being) has M depends, not only on conditions inside the person.
     
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  29. Martin Davies, In the Armchair, Down and Out.
    Sitting in the philosopher’s armchair, I am not engaged in any detailed empirical investigation of the world. But, as I pursue philosophy’s distinctive armchair methodology, I sometimes come upon arguments that appear to disclose requirements for thought. According to some of these arguments, being a thinking person requires having the right kind of history, or having the right kind of cognitive architecture. According to other arguments, being able to think about particular topics requires being a member of a community of (...)
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  30. Martin Davies (2003). The Problem of Armchair Knowledge. In Susana Nuccetelli (ed.), New Essays on Semantic Externalism and Self-Knowledge. MIT Press.
    He then argues that (1), (2) and (3) constitute an inconsistent triad as follows (1991, p. 15): Suppose (1) that Oscar knows a priori that he is thinking that water is wet. Then by (2), Oscar can simply deduce E, using premisses that are knowable a priori, including the premiss that he is thinking that water is wet. Since Oscar can deduce E from premisses that are knowable a priori, Oscar can know E itself a priori. But this contradicts (3), (...)
     
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  31. Martin L. Davies (2003). Klassische Aufklärung. Überlegungen zur Modernisierung der deutsch-jüdischen Kultur am Beispiel des Exlibris von David Friedländer. Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 55 (1):40-61.
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  32. Martin Davies & Tony Stone (2003). Psychological Understanding and Social Skills. In B. Repacholi & V. Slaughter (eds.), Individual Differences in Theory of Mind: Implications for Typical and Atypical Development. Hove, E. Sussex: Psychology Press.
    In B. Repacholi and V. Slaughter (eds), _Individual Differences in Theory of Mind: Implications for Typical and Atypical_ _Development_. Macquarie Monographs in Cognitive Science. Hove, E. Sussex: Psychology Press, 2003..
     
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  33. Robyn Langdon, Martin Davies & Max Coltheart (2002). Understanding Minds and Understanding Communicated Meanings in Schizophrenia. Mind and Language 17 (1&2):68-104.
  34. Robyn Langdon, Martin Davies & Max Coltheart (2002). Understanding Minds and Understanding Communicated Meanings in Schizophrenia. Mind and Language 17 (1-2):68-104.
    Cognitive neuropsychology is that branch of cognitive psychology that investi- gates people with acquired or developmental disorders of cognition. The aim is to learn more about how cognitive systems normally operate or about how they are normally acquired by studying selective patterns of cognitive break- down after brain damage or selective dif?culties in acquiring particular cogni- tive abilities. In the early days of modern cognitive neuropsychology, research focused on rather basic cognitive abilities such as speech comprehension or production at the (...)
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  35. Tony Stone & Martin Davies (2002). Chomsky Amongst the Philosophers. Mind and Language 17 (3):276-289.
  36. Tony Stone & Martin Davies (2002). Chomsky Among the Philosophers. Mind and Language 17 (3):276-289.
    A major recurrent feature of the intellectual landscape in cognitive science is the appearance of a collection of essays by Noam Chomsky. These collections serve both to inform the wider cognitive science community about the latest developments in the approach to the study of language that Chomsky has advocated for almost fifty years now,1 and to provide trenchant criticisms of what he takes to be mistaken philosophical objections to this approach. This new collection contains seven essays, the earliest of which (...)
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  37. M. Davies (2001). Knowledge (Explicit and Implicit): Philosophical Aspects. In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. 12--8126.
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  38. M. Davies (2001). Review: Virgil and the Myth of Venice. Books and Readers in the Italian Renaissance. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (2):367-369.
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  39. Martin Davies (2001). Explicit and Implicit Knowledge: Philosophical Aspects. In N. J. Smelser & P. B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Amsterdam: Elsevier Science Ltd.
    from the fact that the subject reacts faster to those words than to words that were not on the list. The subject.
     
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  40. Martin Davies, Max Coltheart, Robyn Langdon & N. Breen (2001). Monothematic Delusions: Towards a Two-Factor Account. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 8 (2-3):133-58.
    We provide a battery of examples of delusions against which theoretical accounts can be tested. Then, we identify neuropsychological anomalies that could produce the unusual experiences that may lead, in turn, to the delusions in our battery. However, we argue against Maher’s view that delusions are false beliefs that arise as normal responses to anomalous experiences. We propose, instead, that a second factor is required to account for the transition from unusual experience to delusional belief. The second factor in the (...)
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  41. Martin Davies & Tony Stone (2001). Mental Simulation, Tacit Theory, and the Threat of Collapse. Philosophical Topics 29 (1-2):127-73.
    According to the theory theory of folk psychology, our engagement in the folk psychological practices of prediction, interpretation and explanation draws on a rich body of knowledge about psychological matters. According to the simulation theory, in apparent contrast, a fundamental role is played by our ability to identify with another person in imagination and to replicate or re-enact aspects of the other person’s mental life. But amongst theory theorists, and amongst simulation theorists, there are significant differences of approach.
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  42. Max Coltheart & Martin Davies (2000). Pathologies of Belief. Blackwell.
    Blackwell, 2000 Review by George Graham, Ph.D on Oct 27th 2000 Volume: 4, Number: 43.
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  43. Martin Davies (2000). Externalism, Architecturalism, and Epistemic Warrant. In C. Wright, B. Smith & C. Macdonald (eds.), Knowing Our Own Minds. Oxford University Press. 321-363.
    This paper addresses a problem about epistemic warrant. The problem is posed by philosophical arguments for externalism about the contents of thoughts, and similarly by philosophical arguments for architecturalism about thinking, when these arguments are put together with a thesis of first person authority. In each case, first personal knowledge about our thoughts plus the kind of knowledge that is provided by a philosophical argument seem, together, to open an unacceptably ‘non-empirical’ route to knowledge of empirical facts. Furthermore, this unwelcome (...)
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  44. Martin Davies (2000). Externalism and Armchair Knowledge. In Paul A. Boghossian & Christopher Peacocke (eds.), New Essays on the a Priori. Oxford University Press. 384--414.
    [I]f you could know a priori that you are in a given mental state, and your being in that state conceptually or logically implies the existence of external objects, then you could know a priori that the external world exists. Since you obviously _can.
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  45. Martin Davies (2000). Externalism and a Priori Knowledge. In Paul Boghossian & Christopher Peacocke (eds.), New Essays on the a Priori. Oxford University Press. 384--432.
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  46. Martin Davies (2000). Interaction Without Reduction: The Relationship Between Personal and Subpersonal Levels of Description. Mind and Society 1 (2):87-105.
    Starting from Dennett's distinction between personal and sub-personal levels of description, I consider the relationships amongst three levels: the personal level, the level of information-processing mechanisms, and the level of neurobiology. I defend a conception of the relationship between the personal level and the sub-personal level of information-processing mechanisms as interaction without reduction . Even given a nonreductionist conception of persons, philosophical theorizing sometimes supports downward inferences from the personal to the sub-personal level. An example of a downward inference is (...)
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  47. Martin Davies (2000). Persons and Their Underpinnings. Philosophical Explorations 3 (1):43-62.
    I defend a conception of the relationship between the personal and sub-personal levels as interaction withoutreduction.There are downward inferences from the personal to the sub-personal level but we find upward explanatory gaps when we try to construct illuminating accounts of personal level conditions using just sub-personal level notions. This conception faces several serious challenges but the objection that I consider in this paper says that, when theories support downward inferences from the personal to the sub-personal level, this is the product (...)
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  48. Martin Davies & Max Coltheart (2000). Introduction: Pathologies of Belief. Mind and Language 15 (1):1–46.
    who are unrecognizable because they are in disguise. ¼ The person I see in the mirror is not really me. ¼ A person I knew who died is nevertheless in the hospital ward today. ¼ This arm [the speaker’s left arm] is not mine it is yours; you have..
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  49. Martin Davies & Max Coltheart (2000). Pathologies of Belief. Mind and Language 15:1-46.
    1923; Young, this volume); the Cotard delusion (Cotard, 1882; Berrios and Luque, 1995; Young, this volume); the Fregoli delusion (Courbon and Fail, 1927; de Pauw, Szulecka and Poltock, 1987; Ellis, Whitley and Luaute´, 1994); the delusion of mirrored-self misidentifi- cation (Foley and Breslau, 1982; Breen et al., this volume); a delusion of reduplicative param- nesia (Benson, Gardner and Meadows, 1976; Breen et al., this volume); a delusion sometimes found in patients suffering from unilateral neglect (Bisiach, 1988); and the delusions of (...)
     
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  50. Martin Davies & Tony Stone (2000). Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy Online.
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  51. Martin Davies & Tony Stone (2000). Simulation Theory. In Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy Online.
    Mental simulation is the simulation, replication or re-enactment, usually in imagination, of the thinking, decision-making, emotional responses, or other aspects of the mental life of another person. According to simulation theory, mental simulation in imagination plays a key role in our everyday psychological understanding of other people. The same mental resources that are used in our own thinking, decision-making or emotional responses are redeployed in imagination to provide an understanding of the thoughts, decisions or emotions of another.
     
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  52. Tony Stone & Martin Davies (2000). Autonomous Psychology and the Moderate Neuron Doctrine. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):849-850.
    _Two notions of autonomy are distinguished. The respective_ _denials that psychology is autonomous from neurobiology are neuron_ _doctrines, moderate and radical. According to the moderate neuron_ _doctrine, inter-disciplinary interaction need not aim at reduction. It is_ _proposed that it is more plausible that there is slippage from the_ _moderate to the radical neuron doctrine than that there is confusion_ _between the radical neuron doctrine and the trivial version._.
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  53. Tony Stone & Martin Davies (1999). Autonomous Psychology and the Moderate Neuron Doctrine. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):849-850.
  54. Martin Davies (1998). Language, Thought, and the Language of Thought (Aunty's Own Argument Revisited). In P. Carruthers & J. Boucher (eds.), Language and Thought. Cambridge University Press. 226.
    In this chapter, I shall be examining an argument for the language of thought hypothesis.
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  55. Martin Davies & Tony Stone (1998). Folk Psychology and Mental Simulation. In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 42. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 53-82.
    This paper is about the contemporary debate concerning folk psychology – the debate between the proponents of the theory theory of folk psychology and the friends of the simulation alternative.1 At the outset, we need to ask: What should we mean by this term ‘folk psychology’?
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  56. Tony Stone & Martin Davies (1998). Folk Psychology and Mental Simulation. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 43:53-82.
    This paper is about the contemporary debate concerning folk psychology – the debate between the proponents of the theory theory of folk psychology and the friends of the simulation alternative.1 At the outset, we need to ask: What should we mean by this term ‘folk psychology’?
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  57. Martin Davies (1997). Externalism and Experience. In Ned Block & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.), The Nature of Consciousness: Philosophical Debates. Mit Press. 244-250.
    In this paper, I shall defend externalism for the contents of perceptual experience. A perceptual experience has representational properties; it presents the world as being a certain way. A visual experience, for example, might present the world to a subject as containing a surface with a certain shape, lying at a certain distance, in a certain direction; perhaps a square with sides about 30 cm, lying about one metre in front of the subject, in a direction about 20 degrees to (...)
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  58. Martin Davies (1997). Poggio Bracciolini. In Jill Kraye (ed.), Cambridge Translations of Renaissance Philosophical Texts. Cambridge University Press. 135.
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  59. Martin Davies (1997). Multiple Review of Norton Nelkin's Consciousness and the Origins of Thought: Introduction. Mind and Language 12 (2):178-180.
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  60. Tony Stone & Martin Davies (1996). The Mental Simulation Debate: A Progress Report. In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. 119--137.
    1. Introduction For philosophers, the current phase of the debate with which this volume is concerned can be taken to have begun in 1986, when Jane Heal and Robert Gordon published their seminal papers (Heal, 1986; Gordon, 1986; though see also, for example, Stich, 1981; Dennett, 1981). They raised a dissenting voice against what was becoming a philosophical orthodoxy: that our everyday, or folk, understanding of the mind should be thought of as theoretical. In opposition to this picture, Gordon and (...)
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  61. Anthony P. Atkinson & Martin Davies (1995). Consciousness Without Conflation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):248-249.
    Although information-processing theories cannot provide a full explanatory account of P-consciousness, there is less conflation and confusion in cognitive psychology than Block suspects. Some of the reasoning that Block criticises can be interpreted plausibly in the light of a folk psychological view of the relation between P-consciousness and A-consciousness.
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  62. Martin Davies (1995). Consciousness and the Varieties of Aboutness. In C. Macdonald (ed.), Philosophy of Psychology: Debates on Psychological Explanation. Oxford University Press. 2.
    Thinking is special. There is nothing quite like it. Thinking.
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  63. Martin Davies (1995). Philosophy: A Guide Through the Subject. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  64. Martin Davies (1995). Two Notions of Implicit Rules. Philosophical Perspectives 9:153-83.
  65. Martin Davies (1995). The Philosophy of Mind. In A. C. Grayling (ed.), Philosophy: A Guide Through the Subject. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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  66. Martin Davies & Tony Stone (eds.) (1995). Folk Psychology: The Theory of Mind Debate. Blackwell.
  67. Martin Davies & Tony Stone (eds.) (1995). Mental Simulation: Evaluations and Applications. Blackwell.
  68. Martin Davies & Tony Stone (1995). Mental Simulation: Evaluations and Applications - Reading in Mind and Language. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  69. Martin Davies (1994). Antyredukcyjny naturalizm. Z Peterem Frederickiem Strawsonem rozmawiają Mark Sainsbury i Martin Davies. Filozofia Nauki 2.
    Professor Strawson was interviewed on video on location at King's College, London during the Spring of 1992. Professor Strawson discusses his thoughts on a variety of topics on which he has written previously, providing some illuminating insights into how his thoughts has progressed. The text published here is en excerpt from this interview, translated with kind permission of Mr Rudolf V. Fara, the producer, in which prof. Strawson discusses his philosophical views with Martin Davies, Wilde Reader in Mental Philosophy at (...)
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  70. Martin Davies (1994). The Mental Simulation Debate. Philosophical Issues 5:189-218.
    For philosophers, the current phase of the debate with which this volume is concerned can be taken to have begun in 1986, when Jane Heal and Robert Gordon published their seminal papers (Heal, 1986; Gordon, 1986; though see also, for example, Stich, 1981; Dennett, 1981). They raised a dissenting voice against what was becoming a philosophical orthodoxy: that our everyday, or folk, understanding of the mind should be thought of as theoretical. In opposition to this picture, Gordon and Heal argued (...)
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  71. Jody Azzouni, Emmon Bach, Chris Barker, Wojciech Buzkowski, Robyn Carsten, Gennaro Chierchia, Max Cresswell, Mark Crimmins, Mary Dalrymple & Martin Davies (1993). Reviewers of Submitted Papers During 1993. Linguistics and Philosophy 16:655-556.
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  72. M. Davies & G. Humphreys (eds.) (1993). Consciousness: A Mind and Language Reader. Blackwell.
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  73. Martin Davies (1993). Aims and Claims of Externalist Arguments. Philosophical Issues 4:227-249.
  74. Martin Davies & Glyn W. Humphreys (1993). Consciousness: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Blackwell.
     
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  75. Martin Davies & Glyn W. Humphreys (eds.) (1993). Consciousness: Psychological and Philosophical Essays. Blackwell.
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  76. Glyn W. Humphreys & Martin Davies (eds.) (1993). Consciousness: Psychological and Philosophical Essays. Blackwell.
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  77. John Kittmer, Sophocles, M. Davies & B. Heiden (1993). TrachiniaeTragic Rhetoric: An Interpretation of Sophocles' Trachiniae. Journal of Hellenic Studies 113:187.
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  78. Tony Stone & Martin Davies (1993). Cognitive Neuropsychology and the Philosophy of Mind. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (4):589-622.
  79. Martin Davies (1992). Aunty's Own Argument for the Language of Thought. In Jes Ezquerro (ed.), Cognition, Semantics and Philosophy. Kluwer. 235--271.
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  80. Martin Davies (1992). Perceptual Content and Local Supervenience. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 66:21-45.
  81. Martin Davies (1992). Thinking Persons and Cognitive Science. In A. Clark & Ronald Lutz (eds.), Connectionism in Context. Springer-Verlag. 111--122.
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  82. Martin Davies (1991). Concepts, Connectionism, and the Language of Thought. Philosophy and Connectionist Theory. Lawrence Erlbaum:229--57.
  83. Martin Davies (1991). Concepts, Connectionism, and the Language of Thought. In W Ramsey, Stephen P. Stich & D. Rumelhart (eds.), Philosophy and Connectionist Theory. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 485-503.
    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate a _prima facie_ tension between our commonsense conception of ourselves as thinkers and the connectionist programme for modelling cognitive processes. The language of thought hypothesis plays a pivotal role. The connectionist paradigm is opposed to the language of thought; and there is an argument for the language of thought that draws on features of the commonsense scheme of thoughts, concepts, and inference. Most of the paper (Sections 3-7) is taken up with the (...)
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  84. Martin Davies (1991). Individualism and Perceptual Content. Mind 100 (399):461-84.
  85. M. Davies, Homer & M. Fusillo (1990). La battaglia delle rane e dei topi: Batrachomyomachia. Journal of Hellenic Studies 110:210.
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  86. Martin Davies (1990). Thinking Persons and Cognitive Science. AI and Society 4 (1):39-50.
    Cognitive psychology and cognitive science are concerned with a domain of cognition that is much broader than the realm of judgement, belief, and inference. The idea of states with semantic content is extended far beyond the space of reasons and justification. Within this broad class of states we should, however, differentiate between the states distinctive of thinking persons — centrally, beliefs, desires, and intentions — and other states. The idea of consciousness does not furnish a principle of demarcation. But the (...)
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  87. M. Davies & M. W. Haslam (1989). Oxyrhynchus Papyri. Vol. Liii. Journal of Hellenic Studies 109:247.
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  88. Martin Davies (1989). Connectionism, Modularity and Tacit Knowledge. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (December):541-55.
    In this paper, I define tacit knowledge as a kind of causal-explanatory structure, mirroring the derivational structure in the theory that is tacitly known. On this definition, tacit knowledge does not have to be explicitly represented. I then take the notion of a modular theory, and project the idea of modularity to several different levels of description: in particular, to the processing level and the neurophysiological level. The fundamental description of a connectionist network lies at a level between the processing (...)
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  89. Martin Davies (1989). Leblanc Hugues. Alternatives to Standard First-Order Semantics. Handbook of Philosophical Logic, Volume I, Elements of Classical Logic, Edited by Gabbay D. And Guenthner F., Synthese Library, Vol. 164, D. Reidel Publishing Company, Dordrecht, Boston, and Lancaster, 1983, Pp. 189–274. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 54 (4):1483-1484.
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  90. Martin Davies (1989). Review: Hugues Leblanc, D. Gabbay, F. Guenthner, Alternatives to Standard First-Order Semantics. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 54 (4):1483-1484.
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  91. Martin Davies (1989). 'Two Examiners Marked Six Scripts.' Interpretations of Numerically Quantified Sentences. Linguistics and Philosophy 12 (3):293 - 323.
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  92. Martin Davies (1989). Tacit Knowledge and Subdoxastic States. In A. George (ed.), Reflections on Chomsky. Blackwell.
  93. M. Davies & F. Bossi (1988). Studi Sul Margite. Journal of Hellenic Studies 108:222.
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  94. M. Davies & G. Markwald (1988). Die Homerischen Epigramme: Sprachliche und inhaltliche Untersuchungen. Journal of Hellenic Studies 108:221.
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  95. Martin Davies (1988). La connaissance tacite (modularité et subdoxasticité). Hermes 3:85.
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  96. Martin Davies (1987). Relevance and Mutual Knowledge. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):716.
  97. Martin Davies (1987). Tacit Knowledge and Semantic Theory: Can a Five Percent Difference Matter? Mind 96 (October):441-62.
    In his paper ‘Scmantic Theory and Tacit Knowlcdgc’, Gareth Evans uscs a familiar kind of cxamplc in ordcr to render vivid his account of tacit knowledge. We arc to consider a finite language, with just one hundrcd scntcnccs. Each scntcncc is made up of a subjcct (a name) and a prcdicatc. The names are ‘a’, ‘b’, . . ., T. The prcdicatcs arc ‘F’, ‘G’, . . ., ‘O’. Thc scntcnccs have meanings which dcpcnd in a systematic way upon their (...)
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  98. M. Davies (1986). Alcaeus Fr. 42'. Hermes 114:257-62.
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  99. Martin Davies (1986). Externality, Psychological Explanation, and Narrow Content. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 60:263-83.
  100. Martin Davies (1986). Individualism and Supervenience: Externality, Psychological Explanation, and Narrow Content. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 263:263-283.
  101. Martin Davies (1986). Lewis, David [1983]: Philosophical Papers Volume I. Oxford University Press. Hardback £20.00. Paperback £8.95. Xii+285 Pp. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 37 (1):130-134.
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  102. Martin Davies (1986). Tacit Knowledge and the Structure of Thought and Language. In Charles S. Travis (ed.), Meaning and Interpretation. Blackwell.
  103. Martin Davies (1984). Taylor on Meaning-Theories and Theories of Meaning. Mind 93 (369):85-90.
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  104. Martin Davies (1983). Actuality and Context Dependence II. Analysis 43 (3):128 - 133.
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  105. Martin Davies (1983). Function in Perception. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 61 (December):409-426.
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  106. Martin Davies (1983). Meaning and Structure. Philosophia 13 (1-2):13-33.
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  107. Martin Davies (1982). Individuation and the Semantics of Demonstratives. Journal of Philosophical Logic 11 (3):287 - 310.
    Obsessed by the cases where things go wrong, we pay too little attention to the vastly more numerous cases where they go right, and where it is perhaps easier to see that the descriptive content of the expression concerned is wholly at the service of this function [of identifying reference], a function which is complementary to that of predication and contains no element of predication in itself (Strawson [1974], p. 66).An earlier version of the paper was written during an enjoyable (...)
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  108. Martin Davies (1982). Sentence Modifiers and Semantic Theories: A Note on a Conjecture. Analysis 42 (1):7 - 11.
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  109. Martin Davies (1982). Idiom and Metaphor. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 83:67-85.
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  110. M. Davies, Elegy, B. Gentili & C. Prato (1981). Poetarum Elegiacorum Testimonia Et Fragmenta. Journal of Hellenic Studies 101:167.
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  111. Martin Davies (1981). Meaning, Quantification, Necessity: Themes in Philosophical Logic. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  112. Martin Davies (1981). Meaning, Structure and Understanding. Synthese 48 (1):135 - 161.
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  113. Martin Davies (1980). A Note on Substitutional Quantification. Noûs 14 (4):619-622.
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  114. Martin Davies (1980). Determinism and Evil. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58 (2):116 – 127.
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  115. Martin Davies (1980). Determinism and Evil. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58 (2):116-127.
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  116. Martin Davies & Lloyd Humberstone (1980). Two Notions of Necessity. Philosophical Studies 38 (1):1-31.
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  117. M. Davies (1974). Poetic Imagination. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 5 (1):46-50.
     
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  118. Martin Davies, A Principled Solution to the Problem of Armchair Knowledge.
    The problem of armchair knowledge arises when there are armchair warrants for believing the premises of a palpably valid argument, yet it is implausible that the question whether or not the conclusion of the argument is true can be settled from the armchair. In the first lecture, I presented three instances of the problem, arising from an architecturalist argument, (LOT), an externalist argument, (WATER), and an argument about colour concepts, (RED). Other instances could be presented; I shall mention some later (...)
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  119. Martin Davies, Begging the Question and Settling the Question.
    In the first lecture, I presented three instances of the problem of armchair knowledge arising from the (LOT), (RED), and (WATER) arguments. In each case, there are armchair warrants for believing the premises, but it is implausible that the question whether or not the conclusion of the argument is true could be settled from the armchair.
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  120. Martin Davies, Foundational Issues in the Philosophy of Language.
    Linguistic expressions are meaningful. Sentences, built from words and phrases, are used to communicate information about objects, properties and events in the world. In philosophy of language, the study of linguistic meaning is central.
     
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  121. Martin Davies, Gareth Evans (12 May 1946 – 10 August 1980).
    As an undergraduate from 1964 to 1967, Gareth Evans, a British philosopher of language and mind, studied for the PPE degree (philosophy, politics and economics) at University College, Oxford, where his philosophy tutor was Peter Strawson. He was then a Senior Scholar at Christ Church, Oxford (1967–68) and a Kennedy Scholar visiting Harvard and Berkeley (1968–69). In 1968, less than a year after completing his degree, Evans was elected to a Fellowship at University College. He took up the position in (...)
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  122. Martin Davies, Inference and Explanation in Cognitive Neuropsychology.
    The question posed by Dunn and Kirsner (D&K) is an instance of a more general one: What can we infer from data? One answer, if we are talking about logically valid deductive inference, is that we cannot infer theories from data. A theory is supposed to explain the data and so cannot be a mere summary of the data to be explained. The truth of an explanatory theory goes beyond the data and so is never logically guaranteed by the data. (...)
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  123. Martin Davies, Philosophy of Language.
    Philosophy of language deals with questions that arise from our ordinary, everyday conception of language. (Philosophy of linguistics, in contrast, follows up questions that arise from the scientific study of language.) But saying this does not yet give a clear idea of the sorts of questions that belong distinctively in philosophy of language. Wittgenstein said (1953, §119), ‘The results of philosophy are the uncovering of one or another piece of plain nonsense and of bumps that the understanding has got by (...)
     
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