Helen Beebee University of Birmingham
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  • Faculty, University of Birmingham
  • PhD, King's College London, 1996.

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  1. H. Beebee, C. Hitchcock & H. Price (eds.) (forthcoming). Making a Difference, Oxford (Oxford University) (Forthcoming). Oxford University Press.
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  2. Helen Beebee, Christopher Hitchcock & Huw Price (eds.) (forthcoming). Making a Difference. Oxford University Press.
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  3.  27
    Helen Beebee (2014). Radical Indeterminism and Top-Down Causation. Res Philosophica 91 (3):537-545.
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  4.  57
    Helen Beebee (2013). Hume's Two Definitions: The Procedural Interpretation. Hume Studies 37 (2):243-274.
    Hume's two definitions of causation have caused an extraordinary amount of controversy. The starting point for the controversy is the fact, well known to most philosophy undergraduates, that the two definitions aren't even extensionally equivalent, let alone semantically equivalent. So how can they both be definitions? One response to this problem has been to argue that Hume intends only the first as a genuine definition—an interpretation that delivers a straightforward regularity interpretation of Hume on causation. By many commentators' lights, however, (...)
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  5.  9
    Helen Beebee (2013). Michelle Bastian Completed Her Ph. D. In Philosophy at the University of New South Wales. She is Currently a Chancellor's Fellow at the Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh. Her Work Focuses on the Use of Time in Social Practises of Inclusion and Exclusion. [REVIEW] In Katrina Hutchison & Fiona Jenkins (eds.), Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? OUP Usa 261.
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  6.  17
    Helen Beebee (2013). Nature Without Abandoning Kripke–Putnam Semantics1. In Stephen Mumford & Matthew Tugby (eds.), Metaphysics and Science. Oxford University Press 141.
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  7.  15
    Helen Beebee (2013). Reply to Strawson:'David Hume: Objects and Power'. In Stewart Duncan & Antonia LoLordo (eds.), Debates in Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses. Routledge 242.
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  8. Helen Beebee (2012). Causation and Necessary Connection. In Alan Bailey & Dan O'Brien (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Hume. Continuum 131.
     
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  9. Helen Beebee (2012). Free Will Sans Metaphysics? Metascience 21 (1):77-81.
    Free will sans metaphysics? Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9525-5 Authors Helen Beebee, Department of Philosophy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT UK Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  10. Helen Beebee, Christopher Hitchcock & Peter Menzies (eds.) (2012). The Oxford Handbook of Causation. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Causation is a central topic in many areas of philosophy. In metaphysics, philosophers want to know what causation is, and how it is related to laws of nature, probability, action, and freedom of the will. In epistemology, philosophers investigate how causal claims can be inferred from statistical data, and how causation is related to perception, knowledge and explanation. In the philosophy of mind, philosophers want to know whether and how the mind can be said to have causal efficacy, and in (...)
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  11. Helen Beebee & Nigel Sabbarton-Leary (eds.) (2012). The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds. Routledge.
    Essentialism--roughly, the view that natural kinds have discrete essences, generating truths that are necessary but knowable only _a posteriori_--is an increasingly popular view in the metaphysics of science. At the same time, philosophers of language have been subjecting Kripke’s views about the existence and scope of the necessary _a posteriori_ to rigorous analysis and criticism. Essentialists typically appeal to Kripkean semantics to motivate their radical extension of the realm of the necessary _a posteriori_; but they rarely attempt to provide any (...)
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  12. Helen Beebee (2011). Hume on Causation. Routledge.
    Hume is traditionally credited with inventing the ‘regularity theory’ of causation, according to which the causal relation between two events consists merely in the fact that events of the first kind are always followed by events of the second kind. Hume is also traditionally credited with two other, hugely influential positions: the view that the world appears to us as a world of unconnected events, and inductive scepticism: the view that the ‘problem of induction’, the problem of providing a justification (...)
     
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  13.  82
    Helen Beebee (2011). Hume's Impact on Causation. The Philosophers' Magazine (54):75-79.
    Many philosophers came to regard “causation” as an illegitimate pseudo-concept. This was a dominant view in analytic philosophy until quite late in the twentieth century. Russell famously quipped that “the law of causality” was “a relic of a bygone age, surviving, like the monarchy, only because it is erroneously supposed to do no harm”.
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    Helen Beebee (2011). Metaphysics: The Key Concepts. Routledge.
    Informative, accessible, and fun to read ” this is an excellent reference guide for undergraduates and anyone wanting an introduction to the fundamental ...
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  15. Nikk Effingham, Helen Beebee & Philip Goff (2011). Metaphysics: The Key Concepts. Routledge.
    _‘Informative, accessible, and fun to read— this is an excellent reference guide for undergraduates and anyone wanting an introduction to the fundamental issues of metaphysics. I know of no other resource like it.’– __Meghan Griffith, Davidson College, USA_ _'Marvellous! This book provides the very best place to start for students wanting to take the first step into understanding metaphysics.Undergraduates would do well to buy it and consult it regularly. The quality and clarity of the material are consistently high.' – __Chris (...)
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  16.  59
    Helen Beebee (2010). Metametaphysics. The Philosophers' Magazine 50:24-25.
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  17.  73
    Helen Beebee & Nigel Sabbarton-Leary (2010). Are Psychiatric Kinds Real? European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 6 (1):11-27.
    The paper considers whether psychiatric kinds can be natural kinds and concludes that they can. This depends, however, on a particular conception of ‘natural kind’. We briefly describe and reject two standard accounts – what we call the ‘stipulative account’ (according to which apparently a priori criteria, such as the possession of intrinsic essences, are laid down for natural kindhood) and the ‘Kripkean account’ (according to which the natural kinds are just those kinds that obey Kripkean semantics). We then rehearse (...)
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  18. Helen Beebee & Nigel Sabbarton-Leary (2010). Introduction. In Helen Beebee & Nigel Sabbarton-Leary (eds.), The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds. Routledge
     
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  19. Helen Beebee & Nigel Sabbarton-Leary (2010). On the Abuse of the Necessary a Posteriori. In Helen Beebee & Nigel Sabbarton-Leary (eds.), The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds. Routledge 159--79.
     
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  20. Helen Beebee & Nigel Sabbarton-Leary (eds.) (2010). The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds. Routledge.
    Essentialism--roughly, the view that natural kinds have discrete essences, generating truths that are necessary but knowable only a posteriori --is an increasingly popular view in the metaphysics of science. At the same time, philosophers of language have been subjecting Kripke’s views about the existence and scope of the necessary a posteriori to rigorous analysis and criticism. Essentialists typically appeal to Kripkean semantics to motivate their radical extension of the realm of the necessary a posteriori ; but they rarely attempt to (...)
     
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  21. Helen Beebee & Markus Schrenk (eds.) (2010). Hume. Metaphysics and Epistemology. Mentis.
    The articles in this special issue of the yearbook Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy all concern, in one way or another, Hume’s epistemology and metaphysics. -/- There are discussions of our knowledge of causal powers, the extent to which conceivability is a guide to modality, and testimony; there are also discussions of our ideas of space and time, the role in Hume’s thought of the psychological mechanism of ‘completing the union’, the role of impressions, and Hume’s argument against the (...)
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  22. Nikk Effingham, Helen Beebee & Philip Goff (2010). Metaphysics: The Key Concepts. Routledge.
    _‘Informative, accessible, and fun to read— this is an excellent reference guide for undergraduates and anyone wanting an introduction to the fundamental issues of metaphysics. I know of no other resource like it.’– __Meghan Griffith, Davidson College, USA_ _'Marvellous! This book provides the very best place to start for students wanting to take the first step into understanding metaphysics.Undergraduates would do well to buy it and consult it regularly. The quality and clarity of the material are consistently high.' – __Chris (...)
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  23. Helen Beebee (2009). Causation and Observation. In Helen Beebee, Christopher Hitchcock & Peter Menzies (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Causation. OUP Oxford
     
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  24. Helen Beebee (2009). John Foster the Divine Lawmaker. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (2):453-457.
  25. Helen Beebee, Peter Menzies & Christopher Hitchcock (eds.) (2009). The Oxford Handbook of Causation. Oxford University Press.
    Causation is a central topic in many areas of philosophy, including metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, ethics, history of philosophy, and philosophy ...
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  26.  19
    Donald Ainslie, Carla Bagnoli, Donald Baxter, Tom Beauchamp, Helen Beebee, Martin Bell, Deborah Boyle, John Bricke, Deborah Brown & Dorothy Coleman (2008). Hume Studies Referees, 2007–2008. Hume Studies 34 (2):323-324.
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  27.  66
    Helen Beebee (2008). Smilansky's Alleged Refutation of Compatibilism. Analysis 68 (299):258–260.
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  28. Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.) (2008). Reading Metaphysics. John Wiley & Sons.
    This collection brings together key contemporary texts in metaphysics and features an interactive commentary which helps readers engage the texts critically and to use them to develop their own views. Each text is followed by a detailed commentary, setting it in context Includes questions designed to help readers think hard about what the author is saying and why, to think of objections, and to formulate his or her own views Aims to improve the reader’s ability to engage critically with philosophical (...)
     
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  29.  7
    Abraham Anderson, Margaret Atherton, Annette Baier, Tom Beauchamp, Helen Beebee, Martin Bell, Lorraine Besser-Jones, Richard Bett, Mark Box & Deborah Boyle (2007). Hume Studies Referees, 2006–2007. Hume Studies 33 (2):385-387.
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  30.  12
    Helen Beebee (2007). Humes Old and New: Peter Millican and Helen Beebee: The Two Definitions and the Doctrine of Necessity. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 107:413 - 431.
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  31. Helen Beebee (2007). Hume on Causation : The Projectivist Interpretation. In Huw Price & Richard Corry (eds.), Causation, Physics, and the Constitution of Reality: Russell's Republic Revisited. Oxford University Press
  32.  49
    Helen Beebee (2007). The Two Definitions and the Doctrine of Necessity. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 107 (1pt3):413-431.
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  33. Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.) (2007). Reading Metaphysics: Selected Texts with Interactive Commentary. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This collection brings together key contemporary texts in metaphysics and features an interactive commentary which helps readers engage the texts critically and to use them to develop their own views. Each text is followed by a detailed commentary, setting it in context Includes questions designed to help readers think hard about what the author is saying and why, to think of objections, and to formulate his or her own views Aims to improve the reader’s ability to engage critically with philosophical (...)
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  34. Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.) (2007). Reading Metaphysics: Selected Texts with Interactive Commentary. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This collection brings together key contemporary texts in metaphysics and features an interactive commentary which helps readers engage the texts critically and to use them to develop their own views. Each text is followed by a detailed commentary, setting it in context Includes questions designed to help readers think hard about what the author is saying and why, to think of objections, and to formulate his or her own views Aims to improve the reader’s ability to engage critically with philosophical (...)
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  35. Helen Beebee (2006). Does Anything Hold the Universe Together? Synthese 149 (3):509-533.
    According to ‘regularity theories’ of causation, the obtaining of causal relations depends on no more than the obtaining of certain kinds of regularity. Regularity theorists are thus anti-realists about necessary connections in nature. Regularity theories of one form or another have constituted the dominant view in analytic Philosophy for a long time, but have recently come in for some robust criticism, notably from Galen Strawson. Strawson’s criticisms are natural criticisms to make, but have not so far provoked much response from (...)
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  36. Helen Beebee (2006). Does Anything Hold the Universe Together? Synthese 149 (3):509-533.
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  37. Helen Beebee (2006). Hume on Causation. Routledge.
    Causation is one of the most important and enduring topics in philosophy, going back to Aristotle. In this important book, Helen Beebee covers all the major debates and issues in the philosophy of causation. Beginning with an introduction to the concept, Causation examines the most important philosopher of causation, David Hume, and assesses the problems of induction and necessary connection in light of Hume's thought. Beebee then investigates different theories of causation and challenges to the Humane approach. She considers the (...)
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  38. Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (2005). Introduction. In Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.), Truthmakers: The Contemporary Debate. Clarendon
     
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  39.  96
    Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.) (2005). Truthmakers: The Contemporary Debate. Clarendon.
  40.  58
    H. Beebee (2004). Review: Scientific Essentialism. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (450):334-340.
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  41. Helen Beebee (2004). Causing and Nothingness. In L. A. Paul, E. J. Hall & J. Collins (eds.), Causation and Counterfactuals. The MIT Press 291--308.
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  42. Helen Beebee (2004). Chance-Changing Causal Processes. In Phil Dowe & Paul Noordhof (eds.), Cause and Chance: Causation in an Indeterministic World. Routledge
    Scepticism concerning the idea of causation being linked to contingent chance-raising is articulated in Beebee’s challenging chapter. She suggests that none of these approaches will avoid the consequence that spraying defoliant on a weed is a cause of the weed’s subsequent health. We will always be able to abstract away enough of the healthy plant processes so all that’s left is the causal chain involving defoliation and health. In those circumstances, there will be contingent chance-raising. Beebee’s conclusion is that we (...)
     
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  43.  82
    Helen Beebee (2004). Review: Ellis, Scientific Essentialism; The Philosophy of Nature. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (450).
  44.  9
    Helen Beebee (2004). The Philosophy of Nature. Mind 113 (450):334-340.
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  45.  5
    H. Beebee & M. Rush (2003). Non-Paradoxical Multi-Location. Analysis 63 (4):311-317.
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  46. Helen Beebee (2003). Local Miracle Compatibilism. Noûs 37 (2):258-277.
  47. Helen Beebee (2003). Seeing Causing. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (3):257-280.
    Singularists about causation often claim that we can have experiences as of causation. This paper argues that regularity theorists need not deny that claim; hence the possibility of causal experience is no objection to regularity theories of causation. The fact that, according to a regularity theorist, causal experience requires background theory does not provide grounds for denying that it is genuine experience. The regularity theorist need not even deny that non-inferential perceptual knowledge of causation is possible, despite the fact that (...)
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  48. Helen Beebee & Michael Rush (2003). Non-Paradoxical Multi-Location. Analysis 63 (4):311–317.
  49. Co-Authored & Helen Beebee (2003). Probability as a Guide to Life. In David Papineau (ed.), The Roots of Reason: Philosophical Essays on Rationality, Evolution, and Probability. Oxford University Press
     
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  50.  4
    H. Beebee (2002). Contingent Laws Rule: Reply to Bird. Analysis 62 (3):252-255.
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  51.  79
    Helen Beebee (2002). Contingent Laws Rule: Reply to Bird. Analysis 62 (3):252–255.
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  52.  96
    Helen Beebee (2002). Reply to Huemer on the Consequence Argument. Philosophical Review 111 (2):235-241.
  53. Helen Beebee (2002). Transfer of Warrant, Begging the Question, and Semantic Externalism. Philosophical Quarterly 51 (204):356-74.
  54. Helen Beebee & Alfred R. Mele (2002). Humean Compatibilism. Mind 111 (442):201-223.
    Humean compatibilism is the combination of a Humean position on laws of nature and the thesis that free will is compatible with determinism. This article's aim is to situate Humean compatibilism in the current debate among libertarians, traditional compatibilists, and semicompatibilists about free will. We argue that a Humean about laws can hold that there is a sense in which the laws of nature are 'up to us' and hence that the leading style of argument for incompatibilism?the consequence argument?has a (...)
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  55. Helen Beebee (2001). Recent Work on Causation. Philosophical Books 42 (1):33-45.
     
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  56. Helen Beebee (2000). The Non-Governing Conception of Laws of Nature. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (3):571-594.
    Recently several thought experiments have been developed which have been alleged to refute the Ramsey-Lewis view of laws of nature. The paper aims to show that two such thought experiments fail to establish that the Ramsey-Lewis view is false, since they presuppose a conception of laws of nature that is radically at odds with the Humean conception of laws embodied by the Ramsey-Lewis view. In particular, the thought experiments presuppose that laws of nature govern the behavior of objects. The paper (...)
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  57.  5
    H. Beebee (1998). Do Causes Raise the Chances of Effects? Analysis 58 (3):182-190.
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  58.  29
    H. Beebee (1998). Review. Causation & Persistence: A Theory of Causation. D Ehring. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (1):181-184.
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  59.  93
    Helen Beebee (1998). Do Causes Raise the Chances of Effects? Analysis 58 (3):182–190.
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  60.  16
    Helen Beebee (1998). Review of Skyrms & Eells (Eds.), Probabilities & Conditionals. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (1).
  61.  3
    Douglas Ehring & Helen Beebee (1998). Causation & Persistence: A Theory of Causation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (1):181-184.
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  62.  11
    Helen Beebee (1997). Counterfactual Dependence and Broken Barometers: A Response to Flichman's Argument. Critica 29 (86):107 - 119.
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  63.  24
    Helen Beebee (1997). Taking Hindrance Seriously. Philosophical Studies 88 (1):59-79.
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  64. Helen Beebee & David Papineau (1997). Probability as a Guide to Life. Journal of Philosophy 94 (5):217-243.
  65.  33
    Helen Beebee & David Papineau (1997). Probability as a Guide to Life. Journal of Philosophy 94 (5):217-243.
  66. Helen Beebee, Christopher Hitchcock & Peter Charles Menzies, Introduction.
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