Farhang Erfani American University
Contact
  • No contact info.

Affiliations
  • Faculty, American University

Areas of specialization

Areas of interest


blank
About me
Not much to say..
My works
8 items found.
Sort by:
  1. Jacques Derrida, Mark Dooley & Farhang Erfani (forthcoming). Hegel, Gwf. Philosophy Today.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Farhang Erfani (2011). Iranian Cinema and Philosophy: Shooting Truth. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Introduction -- How orphans believe: Deleuze, national cinema and Majidi's The color of paradise. Deleuze: on realism and movement-Image -- Deleuze: neorealism (and a brief analysis of Kiarostami's life and nothing more) -- Majidi: The color of paradise -- Deleuze and Majidi: the faith of Mohammad -- "What are filmmakers for in needy times?" On Heidegger and Kiarostami's Taste of cherry -- An overview of Kiarostami's Taste of cherry and the question of the medium -- Heidegger on art and truth (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Farhang Erfani (2011). The Aesthetics of Autonomy: Ricoeur and Sartre on Emancipation, Authenticity, and Selfhood. Lexington Books.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Farhang Erfani (2009). We Are Not Saints, But We Have Kept Our Appointment. Idealistic Studies 39 (1/3):115-123.
    In this essay, I closely read one of the last major works of the late Paul Ricoeur, The Course of Recognition, along with Samuel Beckett’s Waiting forGodot. Ricoeur argues that recognition has not received sufficient attention in the philosophical tradition. Those who have approached the question come mainlyfrom a Hegelian perspective, which posits recognition in terms of struggle. Against this model, Ricoeur argues that we ought to make room for mutual recognition, not grounded in violence and reciprocity but in mutuality. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Farhang Erfani & John F. Whitmire (2008). Ricoeur and the Pre-Political. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (4):501-521.
    We argue that Paul Ricoeur’s work on narrative and alienation provides a largely untapped, though potentially fruitful way of re-thinking the question of political agency within the context of globalization. We argue that the political agency of many around the world has been placed in an exceedingly fragile position due to the rapid pace of globalization, the movement of multi-national corporations from their previous national headquarters, etc. We use Ricoeur’s work to argue that the alienation of globalization is not something (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Farhang Erfani (2007). Committed Perception. Philosophy Today 51 (3):320-329.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Farhang Erfani (2007). Something New Under the Sun: Levinas and the Ethics of Political Imagination. Phaenex 2 (1):46-66.
    Despite Emmanuel Levinas’ own ambivalent relationship to utopianism, Levinasian ethics and utopianism have much in common. First, I look at Levinas’ own remarks on utopianism, to underline the said ambivalence. It is clear that Levinas is concerned with utopia’s “totalitarian” potential. Then I turn to the utopian tradition and scholarship to argue that utopia ought to be properly understood precisely as a resistance to a given order, or totality. Utopia is a form of political imagination that positions itself against the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Farhang Erfani (2004). Sartre and Kierkegaard on the Aesthetics of Boredom. Idealistic Studies 34 (3):303-317.
    This paper analyzes two inauthentic approaches to the problem of boredom from Sartre’s and Kierkegaard’s perpectives. I maintain that their narratives—Nausea and “The “Seducer’s Diary”—fit this problem perfectly, as it is through narratives that we appreciate and learn to avoid boredom. I also submit that their solutions are doomed to failure because they attempt to be the sole authors of their own stories, without making room for alterity.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Is this list right?