Susanna Siegel Harvard University
blank
About me
Not much to say..
My works
53 items found.
Sort by:
  1. S. Siegel (forthcoming). Forthcoming. The Phenomenology of Efficacy. Philosophical Topics.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Susanna Siegel (forthcoming). How is Wishful Seeing Like Wishful Thinking? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    This paper makes the case that when wishful thinking ill-founds belief, the belief depends on the desire in ways can be recapitulated at the level of perceptual experience. The relevant kinds of desires include motivations, hopes, preferences, and goals. I distinguish between two modes of dependence of belief on desire in wishful thinking: selective or inquiry-related, and responsive or evidence-related. I offers a theory of basing on which beliefs are badly-based on desires, due to patterns of dependence that can found (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Susanna Siegel (forthcoming). Precis of The Contents of Visual Experience. Philosophical Studies.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Susanna Siegel (forthcoming). Epistemic Evaluability and Perceptual Farce. In A. Raftopoulos (ed.), Cognitive Effects on Perception: New Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford.
  5. Susanna Siegel (forthcoming). The Contents of Experience. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Susanna Siegel & Nicholas Silins (forthcoming). Attention and Perceptual Justification. In Adam Pautz & Daniel Stoljar (eds.), Festschrift for Ned Block. MIT Press.
  7. Susanna Siegel & Nicholas Silins (forthcoming). The Epistemology of Perception. In Mohan Matthen (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception. Oxford.
    An overview of the epistemology of perception, covering the nature of justification, immediate justification, the relationship between the metaphysics of perceptual experience and its rational role, the rational role of attention, and cognitive penetrability. The published version will contain a smaller bibliography, due to space constraints in the volume.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Nicholas Silins & Susanna Siegel (forthcoming). Consciousness, Attention, and Justification. In Elia Zardini & Dylan Dodd (eds.), Contemporary Perspectives on Scepticism and Perceptual Jusification. Oxford University Press.
    We discuss the rational role of highly inattentive experiences, and argue that they can provide rational support for beliefs.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Susanna Siegel (2014). Affordances and the Contents of Perception. In Berit Brogaard (ed.), Does Perception Have Content? Oxford. 39-76.
  10. Ned Block & Susanna Siegel (2013). Attention and Perceptual Adaptation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):205-206.
  11. Susanna Siegel (2013). Are There Edenic Grounds of Perceptual Intentionality? Analysis 73 (2):329-344.
    This is a critical piece on *The Character of Consciousness* by David Chalmers. It focuses on Chalmers's two-stage view of perceptual content and the epistemology of perceptual belief that flows from this theory, and criticizes his theories of Edenic concepts, perceptual acquaintance, and perceptual belief.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Susanna Siegel (2013). Can Selection Effects on Experience Influence its Rational Role? In Tamar Gendler (ed.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology volume 4. Oxford. 240.
    I distinguish between two kinds of selection effects on experience: selection of objects or features for experience, and anti-selection of experiences for cognitive uptake. I discuss the idea that both kinds of selection effects can lead to a form of confirmation bias at the level of perception, and argue that when this happens, selection effects can influence the rational role of experience.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Susanna Siegel (2013). Erratum To: Precis of The Contents of Visual Experience. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 163 (3):817-817.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Susanna Siegel (2013). Erratum To: Precis of The Contents of Visual Experience. Philosophical Studies 163 (3):817-817.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Susanna Siegel (2013). Precise of The Contents of Visual Experience. Philosophical Studies 163 (3):813-816.
  16. Susanna Siegel (2013). Reply to Campbell. Philosophical Studies 163 (3).
    Reply to John Campbell's contribution to a symposium on *The Contents of Visual Experience*.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Susanna Siegel (2013). Replies to Campbell, Prinz, and Travis. Philosophical Studies 163 (3):847-865.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Susanna Siegel (2013). Reply to Fumerton, Huemer, and McGrath. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):749-757.
    Fumerton, Huemer, and McGrath each contributed to a symposium on "The Epistemic Impact of the Etiology of Experience" in Philosophical Studies. These are my replies their contributions.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Susanna Siegel (2013). Reply to Prinz. Philosophical Studies 163 (3).
    Reply to Jesse Prinz's contribution to a symposium on *The Contents of Visual Experience*.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Susanna Siegel (2013). Reply to Travis. Philosophical Studies 163 (3).
    Reply to Charles Travis's contribution to a symposium on *The Contents of Visual Experience*.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Susanna Siegel (2013). The Epistemic Impact of the Etiology of Experience. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):697-722.
    In this paper I offer a theory of what makes certain influences on visual experiences by prior mental states (including desires, beliefs, moods, and fears) reduce the justificatory force of those experiences. The main idea is that experiences, like beliefs, can have rationally assessable etiologies, and when those etiologies are irrational, the experiences are epistemically downgraded.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Susanna Siegel (2012). Congnitive Penetrability and Perceptual Justification. Noûs 46 (2):201 - 222.
    In this paper I argue that it's possible that the contents of some visual experiences are influenced by the subject's prior beliefs, hopes, suspicions, desires, fears or other mental states, and that this possibility places constraints on the theory of perceptual justification that 'dogmatism' or 'phenomenal conservativism' cannot respect.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. S. Siegel (2010). The Weak Content View. In Bence Nanay (ed.), Perceiving the World. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Susanna Siegel (2010). Do Visual Experiences Have Contents? In Bence -Nanay (ed.), Perceiving the World. Oxford.
  25. Susanna Siegel (2010). The Contents of Visual Experience. Oxford.
    In this book, Susanna Siegel develops a framework for understanding the contents of visual experience, and argues that these contents involve all sorts of ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Susanna Siegel (2009). The Visual Experience of Causation. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (236):519-540.
    In this paper I argue that causal relations between objects are represented in visual experience, and contrast my argument and its conclusion with Michotte's results from the 1960's.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Tamar Gendler, Susanna Siegel & Steven M. Cahn (eds.) (2008). The Elements of Philosophy: Readings From Past and Present. Oxford University Press.
    The Elements of Philosophy: Readings from Past and Present is a comprehensive collection of historical and contemporary readings across the major fields of philosophy. With depth and quality, this introductory anthology offers a selection of readings that is both extensive and expansive; the readings span twenty-five centuries. They are organized topically into five parts: Religion and Belief, Moral and Political Philosophy, Metaphysics and Epistemology, Philosophy of Mind and Language, and Life and Death. The product of the collaboration of three highly (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. S. Siegel, R. Dittrich & J. Vollmann (2008). Ethical Opinions and Personal Attitudes of Young Adults Conceived by in Vitro Fertilisation. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):236-240.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Susanna Siegel (2008). The Epistemic Conception of Hallucination. In Adrian Haddock & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Disjunctivism: Perception, Action and Knowledge. Oxford University Press. 205--224.
    Early formulations of disjunctivism about perception refused to give any positive account of the nature of hallucination, beyond the uncontroversial fact that they can in some sense seem to the same to the subject as veridical perceptions. Recently, some disjunctivists have attempt to account for hallucination in purely epistemic terms, by developing detailed account of what it is for a hallucinaton to be indiscriminable from a veridical perception. In this paper I argue that the prospects for purely epistemic treatments of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Alex Byrne, David Hilbert & Susanna Siegel (2007). Do We See More Than We Can Access? Behavioral and Brain Sciences (5-6):501-502.
    Short commentary on a paper by Ned Block.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Susanna Siegel (2007). How Can We Discover the Contents of Experience? Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (S1):127-42.
    In this paper I discuss several proposals for how to find out which contents visual experiences have, and I defend the method I.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Michael Glanzberg & Susanna Siegel (2006). Presupposition and Policing in Complex Demonstratives. Noûs 40 (1):1–42.
    In this paper, we offer a theory of the role of the nominal in complex demonstrative expressions, such as 'this dog' or 'that glove with a hole in it'.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Susanna Siegel (2006). Direct Realism and Perceptual Consciousness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (2):378-410.
    In The Problem of Perception, A.D. Smith’s central aim is to defend the view that we can directly perceive ordinary objects, such as cups, keys and the like.1 The book is organized around the two arguments that Smith considers to be serious threats to the possibility of direct perception: the argument from illusion, and the argument from hallucination. The argument from illusion threatens this possibility because it concludes that indirect realism is true. Indirect realism is the view that we perceive (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Susanna Siegel (2006). How Does Phenomenology Constrain Object-Seeing? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (3):429 – 441.
    Perception provides a form of contact with the world and the other people in it. For example, we can learn that Franco is sitting in his chair by seeing Franco; we can learn that his hair is gray by seeing the colour of his hair. Such perception enables us to understand primitive forms of language, such as demonstrative expressions.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Susanna Siegel (2006). Subject and Object in the Contents of Visual Experience. Philosophical Review 115 (3):355--88.
    In this paper, I argue that certain perceptual relations are represented in visual experience.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Susanna Siegel (2006). Which Properties Are Represented in Perception? In Tamar S. Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Perceptual Experience. Oxford University Press. 481--503.
    In discussions of perception and its relation to knowledge, it is common to distinguish what one comes to believe on the basis of perception from the distinctively perceptual basis of one's belief. The distinction can be drawn in terms of propositional contents: there are the contents that a perceiver comes to believe on the basis of her perception, on the one hand; and there are the contents properly attributed to perception itself, on the other. Consider the content.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Susanna Siegel, The Contents of Perception. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry on the contents of perception.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Susanna Siegel (2005). The Phenomenology of Efficacy. Philosophical Topics 33 (1):265-84.
    In this paper I argue that certain type of first-personal causal property, efficacy, is represented in perceptual experience.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. S. Siegel (2004). Review of John Campbell's "Reference and Consciousness&Quot;. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 113 (3):427-431.
  40. Susanna Siegel (2004). Indiscriminability and the Phenomenal. Philosophical Studies 120 (1-3):91-112.
    In this paper, I describe and criticize M.G.F. Martin's version of disjunctivism, and his argument for it from premises about self-knowledge.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Susanna Siegel (2004). Review of Reference and Consciousness. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 113 (3):427-431.
  42. Susanna Siegel (2004). Reference and Consciousness. Philosophical Review 113 (3):427-431.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Susanna Siegel, The Dog and the Zombie.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. S. Siegel (2002). A Theory of Sentience. Philosophical Review 111 (1):135-138.
  45. Susanna Siegel (2002). Review of A Theory of Sentience, by Austen Clark. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 111 (1).
    First, what it is for a sentient being to sense is for it to employ two distinct capacities: one for representing places-at-times; the other for representing "features" (60, cf. 70). Exercised together, the result is akin to feature-placing, which brings us to the second thesis: what sensory systems represent is that features are instantiated at place-times. Accordingly, sensory systems do not, for instance, attribute properties to objects, such as trees, tables, bodies, or persons (163).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Susanna Siegel (2002). The Role of Perception in Demonstrative Reference. Philosophers' Imprint 2 (1):1-21.
    Siegel defends "Limited Intentionism", a theory of what secures the semantic reference of uses of bare demonstratives ("this", "that" and their plurals). According to Limited Intentionism, demonstrative reference is fixed by perceptually anchored intentions on the part of the speaker.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. L. G. Allan & S. Siegel (1997). Assessing a New Analysis of the McCollough Effect. Cognition 64:207-222.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. S. Petry & S. Siegel (1989). Differential Processing of Subjective Contour Brightness and Sharpness. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (6):518-518.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Lg Allan, S. Siegel & G. Macqueen (1987). Color Contingent on Words. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (5):339-339.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. J. Macrae & S. Siegel (1987). Different Effects of Morphine in Self-Administering and Yoked-Control Rats. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (5):345-345.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  51. Susanna Siegel, Dialogue About Philosophy in Spanish.
    This is a compilations of short talks presented at a workshop held at Harvard in April 14 on the life of analytic philosophy today in Spanish. Authors include Susanna Siegel, Diana Acosta and Patricia Marechal, Diana Perez, Laura Pérez, and Josefa Toribio.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  52. Susanna Siegel, Misperception.
    In discussions of perception and its provision of knowledge, it is common to distinguish what one comes to believe on the basis of perception from the distinctively perceptual basis of one's belief. The distinction can be drawn in terms of propositional contents: there are the contents that a perceiver would normally come to believe on the basis of her perception, on the one hand; and there are the contents properly attributed to perception itself, on the other. Consider the content.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  53. Susanna Siegel, The Contents of Consciousness.
    A short overview of the philosophical significance of perceptual contents.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Is this list right?