Christopher Bartel Appalachian State University
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  • Faculty, Appalachian State University
  • PhD, King's College London, 2007.

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About me
My research interests primarily lie within aesthetics and philosophy of perception. Within the field of aesthetics, I am particularly interested in the philosophy of music -- the ontology of musical works, musical understanding, the relationship (or lack thereof) between music and language, and philosophy of musical perception. I also have interests in general aesthetics as well as the interrelations between aesthetics and ethics. Within the field of perception, I am particularly interested in examining the nature of auditory experience and developing an account of the representation of the contents of auditory experience. Perhaps controversially, I do not see a sharp distinction between my work in aesthetics and my work in perception. I am currently working on a series of essays designed to demonstrate how much contemporary work in the cognitive science of music could be employed to solve some of the central problems in philosophy of music.
My works
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  1. C. Bartel (forthcoming). Art and Pornography. British Journal of Aesthetics:ayt043.
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  2. Christopher Bartel (2014). Musical Understandings, by Stephen Davies. Mind 123 (492):1184-1187.
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  3. Christopher Bartel (2012). Resolving the Gamer's Dilemma. Ethics and Information Technology 14 (1):11-16.
    Morgan Luck raises a potentially troubling problem for gamers who enjoy video games that allow the player to commit acts of virtual murder. The problem simply is that the arguments typically advanced to defend virtual murder in video games would appear to also support video games that allowed gamers to commit acts of virtual paedophilia. Luck’s arguments are persuasive, however, there is one line of argument that he does not consider, which may provide the relevant distinction: as virtual paedophilia involves (...)
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  4. Christopher Bartel (2012). The Puzzle of Historical Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):213-222.
    Works of fiction are often criticized for their historical inaccuracies. But this practice poses a problem: why would we criticize a work of fiction for its historical inaccuracy given that it is a work of fiction? There is an intuition that historical inaccuracies in works of fiction diminish their value as works of fiction; and yet, given that they are works of fiction, there is also an intuition that such works should be free from the constraints of historical truth. The (...)
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  5. Christopher Bartel (2011). Music Without Metaphysics? British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (4):383-398.
    In a recent pair of articles, Aaron Ridley and Andrew Kania have debated the merits of the study of musical ontology. Ridley contends that the study of musical ontology is orthogonal to more pressing concerns over the value of music. Kania rejects this, arguing that a theory of the value of music must begin with an understanding of the ontology of music. In this essay, I will argue that, despite Kania's rejections, Ridley's criticism exposes a false methodological assumption that needs (...)
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  6. Christopher Bartel (2010). The 'Fine Art' of Pornography? In Dave Monroe (ed.), Porn: Philosophy for Everyone. Wiley-Blackwell. 153--65.
    Can pornographic depictions have artistic value? Much pornography closely resembles art, at least in many superficial respects. Films, photographs, paintings—all of these can have artistic value. Of course, films, photographs and paintings can also be pornographic. If some photographs have artistic value, and some photographs are pornographic, can pornographic photographs have artistic value too? I argue that pornography may only possess artistic value despite, not by virtue of, its pornographic content.
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  7. Christopher Bartel (2010). The Performance of Reading. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 60 (238):220-222.
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  8. Christopher Bartel (2010). Why Music Moves Us - Jeanette Bicknell. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):317-319.
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  9. Christopher Bartel (2009). Works of Music – Julian Dodd. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (237):760-762.
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  10. Christopher Bartel (2008). Listening to Popular Music. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):357-359.
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  11. Christopher Bartel (2005). Art and Value. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (1):94-96.
  12. Christopher Bartel (2004). Is Art Good for Us? Beliefs About High Culture in American Life. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (1):93-96.
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