Michael Bernstein Hebrew University of Jerusalem
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  • Graduate student, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

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  1. N. Lipsman, P. Giacobbe, M. Bernstein & A. M. Lozano (2012). Informed Consent for Clinical Trials of Deep Brain Stimulation in Psychiatric Disease: Challenges and Implications for Trial Design. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (2):107-111.
    Advances in neuromodulation and an improved understanding of the anatomy and circuitry of psychopathology have led to a resurgence of interest in surgery for psychiatric disease. Clinical trials exploring deep brain stimulation (DBS), a focally targeted, adjustable and reversible form of neurosurgery, are being developed to address the use of this technology in highly selected patient populations. Psychiatric patients deemed eligible for surgical intervention, such as DBS, typically meet stringent inclusion criteria, including demonstrated severity, chronicity and a failure of conventional (...)
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  2. Kurt Hugenberg, Don Sacco, Steven Young & Michael Bernstein (2011). Social Categorization Influences Face Perception and Face Memory. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford.
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  3. M. Almeida & M. Bernstein (2003). Lucky Libertarianism. Philosophical Studies 22 (2):93-119.
    Perhaps the greatest impediment to a viable libertarianism is the provision of a satisfactory explanation of how actions that are undetermined by an agent''s character can still be under the control of, or up to, the agent. The luck problem has been most assiduously examined by Robert Kane who supplies a detailed account of how this problem can be resolved. Although Kane''s theory is innovative, insightful, and more resourceful than most of his critics believe, it ultimately cannot account for the (...)
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  4. M. Bernstein (2002). Fatalism. In Robert H. Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Free Will. Oxford University Press.
     
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  5. M. Bernstein (2001). Intrinsic Value. Philosophical Studies 102 (3):329 - 343.
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  6. M. Bernstein & J. Bickle (2000). Fusing Significance Coding with the Stream of Cognitive and Conscious Sequences: Generalizing From a Neurocomputational Model of Motivated Saccadic Eye Movements. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S74 - S75.
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  7. J. Bickle, C. Worley & M. Bernstein (2000). Vector Subtraction Implemented Neurally: A Neurocomputational Model of Some Sequential Cognitive and Conscious Processes. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (1):117-144.
    Although great progress in neuroanatomy and physiology has occurred lately, we still cannot go directly to those levels to discover the neural mechanisms of higher cognition and consciousness. But we can use neurocomputational methods based on these details to push this project forward. Here we describe vector subtraction as an operation that computes sequential paths through high-dimensional vector spaces. Vector-space interpretations of network activity patterns are a fruitful resource in recent computational neuroscience. Vector subtraction also appears to be implemented neurally (...)
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  8. M. Bernstein (1995). Kanean Libertarianism. Southwest Philosophy Review 11 (1):151-57.
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  9. M. Bernstein & G. Myro (1988). Justification and Determinism: An Exchange in Justification. The Monist 71 (3):358-376.
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