Kevin Reuter Ruhr-Universität Bochum
Contact

Affiliations
  • Postdoc, Ruhr-Universität Bochum
  • PhD, Birkbeck College, 2012.

Areas of specialization

Areas of interest


blank
About me
I am a postdoctoral fellow at the Ruhr-University of Bochum working primarily on introspection, consciousness and bodily sensations, and the philosophy of mind and psychology more widely.
My works
11 items found.
Order:
  1.  69
    Michael Messerli & Kevin Reuter (forthcoming). Hard Cases of Comparison. Philosophical Studies:1-24.
    In hard cases of comparison, people are faced with two options neither of which is conceived of as better, worse, or equally good compared to the other. Most philosophers claim that hard cases can indeed be distinguished from cases in which two options are equally good, and can be characterized by a failure of transitive reasoning. It is a much more controversial matter and at the heart of an ongoing debate, whether the options in hard cases of comparison should be (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  8
    Kevin Reuter (forthcoming). The Developmental Challenge to the Paradox of Pain. Erkenntnis:1-19.
    People seem to perceive and locate pains in bodily locations, but also seem to conceive of pains as mental states that can be introspected. However, pains cannot be both bodily and mental, at least according to most conceptions of these two categories: mental states are not the kind of entities that inhabit body parts. How are we to resolve this paradox of pain? In this paper, I put forward what I call the ‘Developmental Challenge’, tackling the second pillar of this (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  4
    Pascale Willemsen & Kevin Reuter (forthcoming). Is There Really an Omission Effect? Philosophical Psychology:1-18.
    The omission effect, first described by Spranca and colleagues, has since been extensively studied and repeatedly confirmed. All else being equal, most people judge it to be morally worse to actively bring about a negative event than to passively allow that event to happen. In this paper, we provide new experimental data that challenges previous studies of the omission effect both methodologically and philosophically. We argue that previous studies have failed to control for the equivalence of rules that are violated (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  3
    Guillermo Del Pinal & Kevin Reuter (2016). Dual Character Concepts in Social Cognition: Commitments and the Normative Dimension of Conceptual Representation. Cognitive Science 40 (8).
    The concepts expressed by social role terms such as artist and scientist are unique in that they seem to allow two independent criteria for categorization, one of which is inherently normative. This study presents and tests an account of the content and structure of the normative dimension of these “dual character concepts.” Experiment 1 suggests that the normative dimension of a social role concept represents the commitment to fulfill the idealized basic function associated with the role. Background information can affect (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Erica Cosentino, Markus Werning & Kevin Reuter (2015). Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Erica Cosentino, Markus Werning & Kevin Reuter (2015). Reading Words Hurts: The Impact of Pain Sensitivity on People’s Ratings of Pain-Related Words. In Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
  7.  72
    Kevin Reuter, Lara Kirfel, Raphael van Riel & Luca Barlassina (2014). The Good, the Bad, and the Timely: How Temporal Order and Moral Judgment Influence Causal Selection. Frontiers in Psychology 5:1-10.
    Causal selection is the cognitive process through which one or more elements in a complex causal structure are singled out as actual causes of a certain effect. In this paper, we report on an experiment in which we investigated the role of moral and temporal factors in causal selection. Our results are as follows. First, when presented with a temporal chain in which two human agents perform the same action one after the other, subjects tend to judge the later agent (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  96
    Kevin Reuter (2011). Distinguishing the Appearance From the Reality of Pain. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (9-10):94-109.
    It is often held that it is conceptually impossible to distinguish between a pain and a pain experience. In this article I present an argument which concludes that people make this distinction. I have done a web-based statistical analysis which is at the core of this argument. It shows that the intensity of pain has a decisive effect on whether people say that they 'feel a pain'(lower intensities) or 'have a pain' (greater intensities). This 'intensity effect'can be best explained by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  81
    Kevin Reuter (2010). Is Imagination Introspective? Philosophia 39 (1):31-38.
    The literature suggests that in sensory imagination we focus on the imagined objects, not on the imaginative states themselves, and that therefore imagination is not introspective. It is claimed that the introspection of imaginative states is an additional cognitive ability. However, there seem to be counterexamples to this claim. In many cases in which we sensorily imagine a certain object in front of us, we are aware that this object is not really where we imagine it to be. So it (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  22
    Hyo-eun Kim, Nina Poth, Kevin Reuter & Justin Sytsma, Where is Your Pain? A Cross-Cultural Comparison of the Concept of Pain in Americans and South Korea.
    Philosophical orthodoxy holds that pains are mental states, taking this to reflect the ordinary conception of pain. Despite this, evidence is mounting that English speakers do not tend to conceptualize pains in this way; rather, they tend to treat pains as being bodily states. We hypothesize that this is driven by two primary factors—the phenomenology of feeling pains and the surface grammar of pain reports. There is reason to expect that neither of these factors is culturally specific, however, and thus (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  17
    Kevin Reuter, Phillips Dustin & Justin Sytsma, Hallucinating Pain.
    The standard interpretation of quantum mechanics and a standard interpretation of the awareness of pain have a common feature: Both postulate the existence of an irresolvable duality. Whereas many physicists claim that all particles exhibit particle and wave properties, many philosophers working on pain argue that our awareness of pain is paradoxical, exhibiting both perceptual and introspective characteristics. In this chapter, we offer a pessimistic take on the putative paradox of pain. Specifically, we attempt to resolve the supposed paradox by (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
Is this list right?