Sally Haslanger Massachusetts Institute of Technology
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  • Faculty, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • PhD, University of California, Berkeley, 1985.

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  1. S. Haslanger (forthcoming). Gender and Social Construction: Who? What? When? Where? How? Theorizing Feminisms:16--23.
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  2. S. Haslanger (forthcoming). On Being Objective and Being Objectified. A Mind of Oneâ’s Own:95--125.
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  3. S. Haslanger (forthcoming). Oppressions: Racial and Other. Racism in Mind:97--123.
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  4. S. Haslanger (forthcoming). Objective Reality, Male Reality, and Social Construction. Women, Knowledge, and Reality:84.
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  5. S. Haslanger (forthcoming). Social Construction: The “debunking” Project. Socializing Metaphysics: The Nature of Social Reality, Ed., Frederick F. Schmitt. Lanham, Md:301--325.
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  6. S. Haslanger (forthcoming). You Mixed? Racial Identity Without Racial Biology. Adoption Matters.
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  7. Sally Haslanger (2013). Race, Intersectionality, and Method: A Reply to Critics. Philosophical Studies:1-11.
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  8. Luvell Anderson, Sally Haslanger & Rae Langton (2012). Language and Race. In Gillian Russell & Delia Graff Fara (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Language. Routledge.
  9. Sally Haslanger (2012). Resisting Reality: Social Construction and Social Critique. Oxford UP.
    In this collection of previously published essays, Sally Haslanger draws on insights from feminist and critical race theory and on the resources of contemporary analytic philosophy to develop the idea that gender and race are positions ...
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  10. Sally Haslanger (2011). Ideology, Generics, and Common Ground. In. In Charlotte Witt (ed.), Feminist Metaphysics. Springer Verlag. 179--207.
  11. Sally Haslanger (2010). Language, Politics, and “The Folk”. The Monist 93 (2):169-187.
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  12. Sally Haslanger (2009). Symposia on Gender, Race and Philosophy. In David Papineau (ed.), Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 5--2.
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  13. Sally Haslanger & Ásta Kristjana Sveinsdóttir, Feminist Metaphysics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  14. Sally Haslanger (2008). Changing the Ideology and Culture of Philosophy: Not by Reason (Alone). Hypatia 23 (2):210-223.
  15. Sally Haslanger, Topics in Feminism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  16. Sally Haslanger (2007). &Quot;but Mom, Crop-Tops Are Cute!&Quot; Social Knowledge, Social Structure and Ideology Critique. Philosophical Issues 17 (1):70–91.
  17. S. Haslanger (2006). Future Genders? Future Races? Moral Issues in Global Perspective: Volume 2 2:102.
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  18. Sally Haslanger (2006). What Good Are Our Intuitions? Philosophical Analysis and Social Kinds. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):89-118.
  19. Sally Haslanger (2006). Sally Haslanger What Good Are Our Intuitions? Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):89–118.
  20. Sally Haslanger & Roxanne Marie Kurtz (eds.) (2006). Persistence: Contemporary Readings. A Bradford Book.
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  21. Sally Haslanger & Jennifer Saul (2006). Philosophical Analysis and Social Kinds. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (1):89-118.
    [Sally Haslanger] In debates over the existence and nature of social kinds such as 'race' and 'gender', philosophers often rely heavily on our intuitions about the nature of the kind. Following this strategy, philosophers often reject social constructionist analyses, suggesting that they change rather than capture the meaning of the kind terms. However, given that social constructionists are often trying to debunk our ordinary (and ideology-ridden?) understandings of social kinds, it is not surprising that their analyses are counterintuitive. This article (...)
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  22. Sally Haslanger (2003). Persistence Through Time. In Michael J. Loux & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. 315--354.
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  23. Sally Haslanger (2000). Defining Knowledge. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2000:41-55.
    With some notable exceptions, feminist epistemologists have not focused (like many contemporary analytic epistemologists) on the the semantics of claims to know: What are the truth conditions of claims of the form S knows that p? My goal in this paper is to suggest a way of approaching the task of specifying the truth conditions for knowledge while (hopefully) making clear how a broad range of feminist work that is often deemed irrelevant to the philosophical inquiry into knowledge is, in (...)
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  24. Sally Haslanger (2000). Feminism and Metaphysics: Unmasking Hidden Ontologies. Apa Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 99 (2):192--196.
    Unlike feminist ethics, or feminist political philosophy, or even feminist epistemology and philosophy of science, feminist metaphysics cannot be said (yet!) to have standing as a full-fledged sub-discipline of either philosophy or feminist theory. Although one can find both undergraduate and graduate courses devoted to the other sub-fields just mentioned, a course in feminist metaphysics is a rare find; and there are few professional philosophers who would consider listing in their areas of specialization both feminist theory and metaphysics. There are (...)
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  25. Sally Haslanger (2000). Feminism in Metaphysics: Negotiating the Natural. In Miranda Fricker & Jennifer Hornsby (eds.), Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 107--126.
  26. Sally Haslanger (2000). Gender and Race: (What) Are They? (What) Do We Want Them to Be? Noûs 34 (1):31–55.
    It is always awkward when someone asks me informally what I’m working on and I answer that I’m trying to figure out what gender is. For outside a rather narrow segment of the academic world, the term ‘gender’ has come to function as the polite way to talk about the sexes. And one thing people feel pretty confident about is their knowledge of the difference between males and females. Males are those human beings with a range of familiar primary and (...)
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  27. Sally Haslanger (1999). What Knowledge is and What It Ought to Be: Feminist Values and Normative Epistemology. Philosophical Perspectives 13 (s13):459-480.
  28. Sally Haslanger (1998). Bodies That Matter. International Studies in Philosophy 30 (4):107-109.
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  29. Sally Haslanger (1995). Ontology and Social Construction. Philosophical Topics 23 (2):95-125.
  30. Sally Haslanger (1994). Humean Supervenience and Enduring Things. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (3):339 – 359.
  31. Sally Haslanger (1992). Ontology and Pragmatic Paradox. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 92:293 - 313.
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  32. Sally Haslanger (1989). Endurance and Temporary Intrinsics. Analysis 49 (3):119-125.
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  33. Sally Haslanger (1989). Persistence, Change, and Explanation. Philosophical Studies 56 (1):1 - 28.
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  34. Sally Haslanger (1985). Persistence, Change and Explanation, Unpublished PhD Dissertation, Berkeley, CA, University of California.(1989a)''Persistence, Change and Explanation''. Philosophical Studies 56:1-28.
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  35. Sally Haslanger, Language, Politics and “The Folk”: Looking for “The Meaning” of 'Race'.
    Contemporary discussions of race and racism devote considerable effort to giving conceptual analyses of these notions. Much of the work is concerned to investigate a priori what we mean by the terms ‘race’ and ‘racism’ (e.g., Garcia 1996; Garcia 1997; Garcia 1999: Blum 2002; Hardimon 2003; Mallon 2004); more recent work has started to employ empirical methods to determine the content of our “folk concepts,” or “folk theory” of race and racism (Glasgow 2009; Glasgow et al 2009; (...)
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  36. Sally Haslanger, Preliminary Report of the Survey on Publishing in Philosophy.
    • Ongoing concerns about time to acceptance/rejection and time to publication. o NB: Schemas kick in when people are rushed. How does this affect the refereeing process? Does it matter for desk rejections, which may be quick and based on nonanonymized papers? Does it also affect referees? How?
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  37. Sally Haslanger, Comments on Charles Mills' "Race and the Social Contract Tradition&Quot;.
    The framing question of Mills' important and thought-provoking paper is whether there is reason for political progressives and radicals to employ the notion of a social contract for either descriptive or normative purposes. In contrast to the common response that the social contract is a piece of "bourgeois mystification" he argues instead that a reformulated conception of the contract, one which he calls the..
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  38. Sally Haslanger, Comments on Sider.
    I’ll start by giving a very brief summary of Sider’s position and will identify some points on which my own position differs from his. I’ll then raise four issues, viz., how to articulate the 3-dimensionalist view, the trade-offs between Ted’s stage view of persistence and endurance with respect to intrinsic properties, the endurantist’s response to the argument from vagueness, and finally more general questions about what’s at stake in the debate. I don’t believe that anything I say raises insurmountable problems (...)
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  39. Sally Haslanger, Gender, Patriotism, and the Events of 9/11.
    In the weeks after 9/11/01, the events of that day were described in many ways. One of the most significant "spins" came from the government: initially the events were described as "a terrorist attack," but not long after they became an "act of war". We were told that what occurred was not a crime to be addressed by punishing the perpetrators, but an attack on a nation-state which requires us to take up arms against the enemy.
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  40. Sally Haslanger, What Good Are Our Intuitions? Philosophical Analysis and Social Kinds.
    Across the humanities and social sciences it has become commonplace for scholars to argue that categories once assumed to be “natural” are in fact “social” or, in the familiar lingo, “socially constructed”. Two common examples of such categories are race and gender, but there many others. One interpretation of this claim is that although it is typically thought that what unifies the instances of such categories is some set of natural or physical properties, instead their unity rests on social features (...)
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