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  1. Monima Chadha (2015). A Buddhist Epistemological Framework for Mindfulness Meditation. Asian Philosophy 25 (1):65-80.
    One of the major aims of this article is to provide the theoretical account of mindfulness provided by the systematic Abhidharma epistemology of conscious states. I do not claim to present the one true version of mindfulness, because there is not one version of it in Buddhism; in addition to the Abhidharma model, there is, for example, the nondual Mahāmudrā tradition. A better understanding of a Buddhist philosophical framework will not only help situate meditation practice in its originating tradition, but (...)
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  2. Charles K. Fink (2015). Clinging to Nothing: The Phenomenology and Metaphysics of Upādāna in Early Buddhism. Asian Philosophy 25 (1):15-33.
    The concept of clinging is absolutely central to early Buddhist thought. This article examines the concept from both a phenomenological and a metaphysical perspective and attempts to understand how it relates to the non-self doctrine and to the ultimate goal of Nibbāna. Unenlightened consciousness is consciousness centered on an ‘I’. It is also consciousness that is conditioned by and bound up with a being in the world. From a phenomenological perspective, clinging gives birth to the illusion of self, or what (...)
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  3. James Giles (2015). Hakuin, Scepticism, and Seeing Into One’s Own Nature. Asian Philosophy 25 (1):81-98.
    One of the most significant figures in the history of Japanese philosophy is the Zen master Hakuin. Yet, in the West, little attempt has been made to present and evaluate his thought in a way that would make it accessible to Western philosophers. This article attempts to redress this neglect. Here, it is shown how Hakuin uses kōan meditation to create ‘the great doubt’ or scepticism concerning the self. Hakuin’s method shares elements in common with both ancient Greek scepticism and (...)
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  4. Eran Laish (2015). Natural Awareness: The Discovery of Authentic Being in the rDzogs Chen Tradition. Asian Philosophy 25 (1):34-64.
    According to the Tibetan Buddhist tradition ‘The Great Perfection’ , we can distinguish between two basic dimensions of mind: an intentional dimension that is divided into perceiver and perceived and a non-dual dimension that transcends all distinctions between subject and object. The non-dual dimension is evident through its intuitional characteristics; an unbounded openness that is free from intentional limitations, a spontaneous luminosity which presences all phenomena, and self-awareness that recognizes the original resonance of beings. Owing to these characteristics, the descriptions (...)
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  5. Yong Li (2015). Adaptationism and Early Confucian Moral Psychology. Asian Philosophy 25 (1):99-111.
    Ryan Nichols in his recent article ‘A genealogy of early Confucian moral psychology’ argues that the discussion of Confucius and Mencius on moral emotions can be provided an evolutionary analysis. Nichols’ argument is based on the evolutionary value of kin-relations and the origin of emotions toward kin in human society. In this article I argue that Nichols’ argument is flawed because he endorses an adaptationist program of human moral psychology. The adaptationists treat kin-relations and our emotions toward kin as a (...)
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  6. Rein Raud (2015). Dōgen’s Idea of Buddha-Nature: Dynamism and Non-Referentiality. Asian Philosophy 25 (1):1-14.
    Busshō, one of the central fascicles of Dōgen’s Shōbōgenzō, is dedicated to the problematic of Buddha-nature, the understanding of which in Dōgen’s thought is fairly different from previous Buddhist philosophy, but concordant with his views on reality, time and person. The article will present a close reading of several passages of the fascicle with comment in order to argue that Dōgen’s understanding of Buddha-nature is not something that entities have, but a mode of how they are, neither in itself nor (...)
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