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Forthcoming articles
  1.  2
    Govand Khalid Azeez (forthcoming). Beyond Edward Said: An Outlook on Postcolonialism and Middle Eastern Studies. Social Epistemology:1-18.
    At the forefront of critically examining the effects of colonization on the Middle East is Edward Said’s magnum opus, Orientalism. In the broadest theoretical sense, Said’s work through deconstructing colonial discourses of power-knowledge, presented an epistemologico-methodological equation expressed most lucidly by Aimé Césaire, colonization=thingification. Said, arguing against that archaic historicized discourse, Orientalism, was simply postulating that colonialism and its systems of knowledges signified the colonized, in Anouar Abdel-Malek’s words, as customary, passive, non-participating and non-autonomous. Nearly four decades later, Said’s contribution (...)
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  2.  7
    Jonathan Baron & Jay Schulkin (forthcoming). Decision-Making and the Threat of Global Warming. Social Epistemology.
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  3.  4
    Antoine Blanchard (forthcoming). From One Community to Many: How Novel Objects in the Crop Protection Field Reveal Epistemic Boundaries. Social Epistemology:1-12.
    In this paper, I present a case study in the field of crop protection and discuss its epistemological implications. Through the advent of a novel class of objects at the end of the 1970s in Europe and the USA, namely plant elicitors that trigger the plant’s own defence reactions, we witness how dissent between epistemic communities appears where assimilation had been the rule. The convergence between the industry and the academia as a coherent “phytosanitary universe”, despite the fact that they (...)
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  4. Charles Camic, Jay Demerath, Tampa Florida, Guy Axtell & Stephan Fuchs (forthcoming). Ajournal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy. Social Epistemology.
     
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  5.  8
    Andrew P. Carlin (forthcoming). On Some Limits of Interdisciplinarity. Social Epistemology:1-19.
    This paper examines the use of “literature” in research projects in Sociology and Library & Information Science and proposes that there are some limits to the programme of interdisciplinarity. The loci of considerations are found in literature review sections of published articles. “The literature” is an arbitrary term that refers to recognized and relevant collections of work according to context. Associating aspects of disciplinary work such as concepts, methods and writings, with Wes Sharrock’s ethnomethodological notion of “ownership”, affords analysis of (...)
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  6. Nader Chokr (forthcoming). A Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy. Social Epistemology.
     
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  7.  3
    Matthew R. X. Dentith (forthcoming). When Inferring to a Conspiracy Might Be the Best Explanation. Social Epistemology:1-20.
    Conspiracy theories are typically thought to be examples of irrational beliefs, and thus unlikely to be warranted. However, recent work in Philosophy has challenged the claim that belief in conspiracy theories is irrational, showing that in a range of cases, belief in conspiracy theories is warranted. However, it is still often said that conspiracy theories are unlikely relative to non-conspiratorial explanations which account for the same phenomena. However, such arguments turn out to rest upon how we define what gets counted (...)
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  8.  5
    Michael D. Doan (forthcoming). Responsibility for Collective Inaction and the Knowledge Condition. Social Epistemology:1-23.
    When confronted with especially complex ecological and social problems such as climate change, how are we to think about responsibility for collective inaction? Social and political philosophers have begun to consider the complexities of acting collectively with a view to creating more just and sustainable societies. Some have recently turned their attention to the question of whether more or less formally organized groups can ever be held morally responsible for not acting collectively, or else for not organizing themselves into groups (...)
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  9.  4
    Chris Dragos (forthcoming). Which Groups Have Scientific Knowledge? Wray Vs. Rolin. Social Epistemology:1-13.
    Kristina Rolin and Brad Wray agree with an increasing number of epistemologists that knowledge can sometimes be attributed to a group and to none of its individual members. That is, collective knowledge sometimes obtains. However, Rolin charges Wray with being too restrictive about the kinds of groups to which he attributes collective knowledge. She rejects Wray’s claim that only scientific research teams can know while the general scientific community cannot. Rolin forwards a ‘default and challenge’ account of epistemic justification toward (...)
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  10. David Faust (forthcoming). Research on the Process of Journal Review Re-Viewed. Social Epistemology.
     
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  11. Judith Genova & Alan G. Gross (forthcoming). A Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy. Social Epistemology.
     
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  12. David Guston & Honi Haber (forthcoming). A Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy. Social Epistemology.
     
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  13. Michael P. Lynch (forthcoming). Epistemic Circularity and Epistemic Incommensurability. Social Epistemology:262--77.
  14.  5
    Marcus Morgan (forthcoming). Humanising Sociological Knowledge. Social Epistemology:1-17.
    This paper elaborates on the value of a humanistic approach to the production and judgement of sociological knowledge by defending this approach against some common criticisms. It argues that humanising sociological knowledge not only lends an appropriate epistemological humility to the discipline, but also encourages productive knowledge development by suggesting that a certain irreverence to what is considered known is far more important for generating useful new perspectives on social phenomena than defensive vindications of existing knowledge. It also suggests that (...)
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  15.  2
    Justin O. Parkhurst & Sudeepa Abeysinghe (forthcoming). What Constitutes “Good” Evidence for Public Health and Social Policy-Making? From Hierarchies to Appropriateness. Social Epistemology:1-15.
    Within public health, and increasingly other areas of social policy, there are widespread calls to increase or improve the use of evidence for policy-making. Often these calls rest on an assumption that increased evidence utilisation will be a more efficient or effective means of achieving social goals. Yet a clear elucidation of what can be considered “good evidence” for policy is rarely articulated. Many of the current discussions of best practise in the health policy sector derive from the evidence-based medicine (...)
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  16.  3
    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc (forthcoming). Hermeneutical Injustice: Blood-Sports and the English Defence League. Social Epistemology:1-19.
    Miranda Fricker identifies a form of injustice she calls “hermeneutical injustice”. She argues that each culture has a stock of shared meanings that its members can use to describe their experience. Cultures are made up of different social groups, with uneven relations of power between them. In some cases, a culture’s shared meanings will reflect the experiences of more powerful groups, and be a poor fit for the experiences of less powerful members, who are subsequently disadvantaged. This is what Fricker (...)
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  17. J. Current Serials (forthcoming). 30cial istemology. Social Epistemology.
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  18. Bigliardi Stefano (forthcoming). The Contemporary Debate on the Harmony Between Islam and Science: Emergence and Challenges of a New Generation. Social Epistemology.
     
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  19.  4
    Nico Stehr & Marian T. Adolf (forthcoming). The Price of Knowledge. Social Epistemology:1-30.
    Our article addresses the question how to assess and measure the value or price of knowledge, and probes the issue from a variety of social scientific and practical perspectives. Against the background of a sociological concept of knowledge, economic, political, social, and juridical perspectives that may lead to a price of knowledge are discussed. We observe that knowledge is seen to play an ever greater role within as well as across economies and politics; that its embodiment makes it difficult to (...)
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  20.  3
    Milan Zafirovski (forthcoming). Rational Choice Theory at the Origin? Forms and Social Factors of “Irrational Choice”. Social Epistemology:1-36.
    The paper addresses the ‘rational choice only’ reconstruction, characterization, and interpretation of classical and neoclassical economics. It argues that such a reconstruction is inaccurate failing to do justice to the dual theoretical character of classical/neoclassical economics. The paper instead proposes and shows that the latter involves not only elements of ‘rational choice theory’ but also those of an alternative conception. It identifies various and important ideas, observations, and implications of irrational choice and action within classical/neoclassical economics. One class of such (...)
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