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Forthcoming articles
  1. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Why Did Feyerabend Defend Astrology? Integrity, Virtue, and the Authority of Science. Social Epistemology:1-19.
    This paper explores the relationship between epistemic integrity, virtue, and authority by offering a virtue epistemological reading of the defences of non-scientific beliefs, practices, and traditions in the writings of Paul Feyerabend. I argue that there was arobust epistemic rationale for those defences and that it can inform contemporaryreflection on the epistemic authority of the sciences. Two common explanations of the purpose of those defences are rejected as lacking textual support. A third "pluralist" reading is judged more persuasive, but found (...)
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  2.  5
    Jonathan Baron & Jay Schulkin (forthcoming). Decision-Making and the Threat of Global Warming. Social Epistemology.
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  3. Nick Bostrom, Thomas Douglas & Anders Sandberg (forthcoming). The Unilateralist’s Curse and the Case for a Principle of Conformity. Social Epistemology:1-22.
    In some situations a number of agents each have the ability to undertake an initiative that would have significant effects on the others. Suppose that each of these agents is purely motivated by an altruistic concern for the common good. We show that if each agent acts on her own personal judgment as to whether the initiative should be undertaken, then the initiative will be undertaken more often than is optimal. We suggest that this phenomenon, which we call the unilateralist’s (...)
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  4. Charles Camic, Jay Demerath, Tampa Florida, Guy Axtell & Stephan Fuchs (forthcoming). Ajournal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy. Social Epistemology.
     
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  5. Tommaso Castellani, Emanuele Pontecorvo & Adriana Valente (forthcoming). Epistemic Consequences of Bibliometrics-Based Evaluation: Insights From the Scientific Community. Social Epistemology:1-22.
    The aim of this paper is to investigate the consequences of the bibliometrics-based evaluation system of scientific production on the contents and methods of sciences. The research has been conducted by means of in-depth interviews to a multi-disciplinary panel of Italian researchers. We discuss the implications of bibliometrics-based evaluation on the choice of the research topic, on the experimental practices, on the dissemination habits. We observe that the validation of the bibliometrics-based evaluation practices relies on the acceptance (...)
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  6. Nader Chokr (forthcoming). A Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy. Social Epistemology.
     
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  7. Danielle DeVasto (forthcoming). Being Expert: L’Aquila and Issues of Inclusion in Science-Policy Decision Making. Social Epistemology:1-26.
    Responding to the call to provide guidance for incorporating diverse perspectives in science-policy debate, Collins and Evans’ normative model of expertise provides a useful starting point for deciding who gets to come to the table—expertise and experience. However, new materialist critiques highlight the epistemic challenges of such an approach. Drawing on the work of Annemarie Mol, I propose that the theory of multiple ontologies and a practise-based orientation can enrich conversations about expertise and inclusion in science-policy decision-making, particularly in matters (...)
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  8. David Faust (forthcoming). Research on the Process of Journal Review Re-Viewed. Social Epistemology.
     
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  9. Judith Genova & Alan G. Gross (forthcoming). A Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy. Social Epistemology.
     
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  10.  3
    Walter Gulick (forthcoming). Relating Polanyi’s Tacit Dimension to Social Epistemology: Three Recent Interpretations. Social Epistemology:1-29.
    Recent books by Harry Collins, Neil Gascoigne and Tim Thornton, and Stephen Turner examine the nature of tacit knowledge and the role it plays in society. Their interpretations are outlined and placed in juxtaposition with the extremely broad understanding of tacit factors in knowing set forth by the originator of the term, Michael Polanyi. I argue that the naturalized version advocated by Turner can best develop the richness of Polanyi’s insights, and I sketch out what some of the aspects of (...)
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  11. David Guston & Honi Haber (forthcoming). A Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy. Social Epistemology.
     
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  12.  4
    Elif Kale-Lostuvali (forthcoming). Two Sociologies of Science in Search of Truth: Bourdieu Versus Latour. Social Epistemology:1-24.
    The sociology of science seeks to theorize the social conditioning of science. This theorizing seems to undermine the validity of scientific knowledge and lead to relativism. Bourdieu and Latour both attempt to develop a sociology of science that overcomes relativism but stipulate opposite conditions for the production of scientific truths: while Bourdieu emphasizes autonomy, Latour emphasizes associations. This is because they work with oppositional epistemological and ontological assumptions. In both theories, the notion of truth lacks an independent definition; (...)
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  13. Michael P. Lynch (forthcoming). Epistemic Circularity and Epistemic Incommensurability. Social Epistemology:262--77.
  14.  4
    Philip R. Olson (forthcoming). Knowing “Necro-Waste”. Social Epistemology:1-20.
    Adopting a waste-directed study of the dead human body, and various practices of body preparation and body disposition in funerary contexts, I argue that necro-waste is a ubiquitous but largely unknown presence. To know necro-waste is to examine the ways in which the dead human body is embedded in particular personal, social, historical, political, and environmental contexts. This study focuses on funerary practices in the US and Canada, where embalming has been routinely practiced. Viewing dead human bodies as materials processed (...)
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  15. J. Current Serials (forthcoming). 30cial istemology. Social Epistemology.
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  16.  8
    Benjamin R. Sherman (forthcoming). There’s No Justice: Why Pursuit of a Virtue is Not the Solution to Epistemic Injustice. Social Epistemology:1-22.
    Miranda Fricker’s book Epistemic Injustice calls attention to an important sort of moral and intellectual wrongdoing, that of failing to give others their intellectual due. When we fail to recognize others’ knowledge, or undervalue their beliefs and judgments, we fail in two important respects. First, we miss out on the opportunity to improve and refine our own sets of beliefs and judgments. Second—and more relevant to the term “injustice”—we can deny people the intellectual respect they deserve. Along with describing the (...)
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    Bigliardi Stefano (forthcoming). The Contemporary Debate on the Harmony Between Islam and Science: Emergence and Challenges of a New Generation. Social Epistemology.
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  18.  5
    Aviezer Tucker (forthcoming). The Generation of Knowledge From Multiple Testimonies. Social Epistemology:1-22.
    The article presents, develops, and defends a non-reductionist model of the generation of knowledge from multiple testimonies. It distinguishes the generation of knowledge from multiple testimonies from the transmission of knowledge by a single testimony. The reiteration of the generation of knowledge from multiple testimonies generates social knowledge.Critical examination of the literature about the coherence of multiple testimonies, their reliability, and independence argues in particular against conditional and causal interpretations and attempts to overcome the limitations of exclusively conceptual and formal (...)
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