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Forthcoming articles
  1.  24
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). The Ethics and Politics of the Brain Drain: A Communal Alternative to Liberal Perspectives. South African Journal of Philosophy 36 (1).
    In Debating Brain Drain, Gillian Brock and Michael Blake both draw on a liberal moral- political foundation to address the issue, but they come to different conclusions about it. Despite the common ground of free and equal persons having a dignity that grounds human rights, Brock concludes that many medical professionals who leave a developing country soon after having received training there are wrong to do so and that the state may place some limits on their ability to exit, whereas (...)
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  2. Motsamai Molefe (forthcoming). A Critique of Thad Metz's African Theory of Moral Status. South African Journal of Philosophy.
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  3.  28
    Thomas Pölzler (forthcoming). Are Moral Judgements Adaptations? Three Reasons Why It Is so Difficult to Tell. South African Journal of Philosophy.
    An increasing number of scholars argue that moral judgements are adaptations, i.e., that they have been shaped by natural selection. Is this hypothesis true? In this paper I shall not attempt to answer this important question. Rather, I pursue the more modest aim of pointing out three difficulties that anybody who sets out to determine the adaptedness of moral judgments should be aware of (though some so far have not been aware of). First, the hypothesis that moral judgements are adaptations (...)
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  4.  59
    Murali Ramachandran (forthcoming). A Neglected Response to the Paradoxes of Confirmation. South African Journal of Philosophy.
    Hempel‘s paradox of the ravens, and his take on it, are meant to be understood as being restricted to situations where we have no additional background information. According to him, in the absence of any such information, observations of FGs confirm the hypothesis that all Fs are G. In this paper I argue against this principle by way of considering two other paradoxes of confirmation, Goodman‘s 'grue‘ paradox and the 'tacking‘ (or 'irrelevant conjunct‘) paradox. What these paradoxes reveal, I argue, (...)
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  5. Willie Esterhuyse (forthcoming). The 'Gay Science' of Nietzsche (in Dutch). South African Journal of Philosophy (August):79-87.
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