Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1.  23
    Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij (forthcoming). Review of Ernest Sosa, 'Judgment and Agency'. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  2.  36
    Marcus Arvan (forthcoming). Transformative Experience, by L.A. Paul. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  3.  9
    Derek Baker (forthcoming). Review of 'Motivational Internalism', Eds. G. Björnsson, C. Strandberg, R. Francén Olinder, J. Eriksson, and F. Björklund. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  4.  19
    Galen Barry (forthcoming). Spinoza and the Feeling of Freedom. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    ABSTRACTWe seem to have a direct experience of our freedom when we act. Many philosophers take this feeling of freedom as evidence that we possess libertarian free will. Spinoza denies that we have free will of any sort, although he admits that we nonetheless feel free. Commentators often attribute to him what I call the ‘Negative Account’ of the feeling: it results from the fact that we are conscious of our actions but ignorant of their causes. I argue that the (...)
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  5.  14
    Saba Bazargan (forthcoming). Defensive Killing, by Frowe, Helen. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
  6.  10
    Gordon Belot (forthcoming). Undermined. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-11.
    A popular strategy for understanding the probabilities that arise in physics is to interpret them via reductionist accounts of chance—indeed, it is sometimes claimed that such accounts are uniquely well-suited to make sense of the probabilities in classical statistical mechanics. Here it is argued that reductionist accounts of chance carry a steep but unappreciated cost: when applied to physical theories of the relevant type, they inevitably distort the relations of probability that they take as input.
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  7.  4
    Nicolas Bommarito (forthcoming). Review of Knowing Better. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  8. Richard Yetter Chappell & Helen Yetter-Chappell (forthcoming). Virtue and Salience. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    This paper explores two ways that evaluations of an agent’s character as virtuous or vicious are properly influenced by what the agent finds salient or attention-grabbing. First, we argue that ignoring salient needs reveals a greater deficit of benevolent motivation in the agent, and hence renders them more blameworthy. We use this fact to help explain our ordinary intuition that failing to give to famine relief (for example) is in some sense less bad than failing to help a drowning child (...)
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  9.  3
    Patrick J. Connolly (forthcoming). The Idea of Power and Locke's Taxonomy of Ideas. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    Locke’s account of the idea of power is thought to be seriously problematic. Commentators allege (1) that the idea of power causes problems for Locke’s taxonomy of ideas, (2) that it is defined circularly, and (3) that contrary to Locke’s claims, it cannot be acquired in experience. This paper defends Locke’s account. Previous commentators have assumed that there is only one idea of power. But close attention to Locke’s text, combined with background features of Locke’s theory of ideas, supports the (...)
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  10.  17
    John Eriksson & Ragnar Francén Olinder (forthcoming). Non-Cognitivism and the Classification Account of Moral Uncertainty. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    ABSTRACTIt has been objected to moral non-cognitivism that it cannot account for fundamental moral uncertainty. A person is derivatively uncertain about whether an act is, say, morally wrong, when her certainty is at bottom due to uncertainty about whether the act has certain non-moral, descriptive, properties, which she takes to be wrong-making. She is fundamentally morally uncertain when her uncertainty directly concerns whether the properties of the act are wrong-making. In this paper we advance a new reply to the objection (...)
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  11.  14
    Alison Fernandes (forthcoming). Varieties of Epistemic Freedom. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    When we deliberate about what to do, we appear to be free to decide on different options. Three accounts use ordinary beliefs to explain this apparent freedom—appealing to different types of ‘epistemic freedom’. When an agent has epistemic freedom, her evidence while deliberating does not determine what decision she makes. This ‘epistemic gap’ between her evidence and decision explains why her decision appears free. The varieties of epistemic freedom appealed to might look similar. But there is an important difference. Two (...)
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  12.  83
    Robert K. Garcia (forthcoming). Tropes as Character-Grounders. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    There is a largely unrecognized ambiguity concerning the nature of a trope. Disambiguation throws into relief two fundamentally different conceptions of a trope and provides two ways to understand and develop each metaphysical theory that put tropes to use. In this paper I consider the relative merits that result from differences concerning a trope’s ability to ground the character of ordinary objects. I argue that on each conception of a trope, there are unique implications and challenges concerning character-grounding.
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  13.  73
    Tyler Hildebrand (forthcoming). Two Types of Quidditism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    According to structuralism, all natural properties are individuated by their roles in causal/nomological structures. According to quidditism, at least some natural properties are individuated in some other way. Because these theses deal with the identities of natural properties, this distinction cuts to the core of a serious metaphysical dispute: Are the intrinsic natures of all natural properties essentially causal/nomological in character? I'll argue that the answer is ‘no’, or at least that this answer is more plausible than many critics of (...)
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  14.  16
    Greg Janzen (forthcoming). 'Brain-Malfunction' Cases and the Dispositionalist Reply to Frankfurt's Attack on PAP. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-12.
    Harry Frankfurt has famously argued against the principle of alternate possibilities (PAP) by presenting a case in which, apparently, a person is morally responsible for what he has done even though he could not have done otherwise. A number of commentators have proposed dispositionalist responses to Frankfurt, arguing that he has not produced a counterexample to PAP because, contrary to appearances, the ability to do otherwise is indeed present but is a disposition that has been ‘masked’ or ‘finked’ by the (...)
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  15.  17
    Alex Kaiserman (forthcoming). Causes and Counterparts. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-12.
    It follows from David Lewis's counterpart-theoretic analysis of modality and his counterfactual theory of causation that causal claims are relativized to a set of counterpart relations. Call this Shlewis's view. I show how Shlewis's view can provide attractively unified solutions to similar modal and causal puzzles. I then argue that Shlewis's view is better motivated, by his own lights, than the view Lewis actually held, and also better motivated than a similar approach which relativizes causal claims to sets of ‘contrast (...)
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  16.  19
    Joongol Kim (forthcoming). What Are Quantities? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    ABSTRACTThis paper presents a view of quantities as ‘adverbial’ entities of a certain kind—more specifically, determinate ways, or modes, of having length, mass, speed, and the like. In doing so, it will be argued that quantities as such should be distinguished from quantitative properties or relations, and are not universals but are particulars, although they are not objects, either. A main advantage of the adverbial view over its rivals will be found in its superior explanatory power with respect to both (...)
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  17.  34
    Roberto Loss (forthcoming). Parts Ground the Whole and Are Identical to It. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-10.
    What is the relation between parts taken together and the whole that they compose? The recent literature appears to be dominated by two different answers to this question, which are normally thought of as being incompatible. According to the first, parts taken together are identical to the whole that they compose. According to the second, the whole is grounded in its parts. The aim of this paper is to make some theoretical room for the view according to which parts ground (...)
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  18.  5
    Melissa McBay Merritt (forthcoming). Manifest Reality: Kant's Idealism and His Realism, by Lucy Allais. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  19.  12
    Brian T. Miller (forthcoming). How to Be a Bayesian Dogmatist. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    ABSTRACTRational agents have consistent beliefs. Bayesianism is a theory of consistency for partial belief states. Rational agents also respond appropriately to experience. Dogmatism is a theory of how to respond appropriately to experience. Hence, Dogmatism and Bayesianism are theories of two very different aspects of rationality. It's surprising, then, that in recent years it has become common to claim that Dogmatism and Bayesianism are jointly inconsistent: how can two independently consistent theories with distinct subject matter be jointly inconsistent? In this (...)
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  20.  7
    Tim Oakley (forthcoming). How to Release Oneself From an Obligation: Good News for Duties to Oneself. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-11.
    ABSTRACTIn some cases, you may release someone from some obligation they have to you. For instance, you may release them from a promise they made to you, or an obligation to repay money they have borrowed from you. But most take it as clear that, if you have an obligation to someone else, you cannot in any way release yourself from that obligation. I shall argue the contrary. The issue is important because one standard problem for the idea of having (...)
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  21.  4
    Michael J. Olson (forthcoming). Locke's Touchy Subjects: Materialism and Immortality, by Nicholas Jolley. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
  22.  66
    Matt Stichter (forthcoming). Practical Skills and Practical Wisdom in Virtue. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTThis paper challenges a frequent objection to conceptualizing virtues as skills, which is that skills are merely capacities to act well, while virtues additionally require being properly motivated to act well. I discuss several cases that purport to show the supposed motivational difference by drawing our attention to the differing intuitions we have about virtues and skills. However, this putative difference between virtue and skill disappears when we switch our focus in the skill examples from the performance (...)
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  23. Travis Timmerman & Yishai Cohen (forthcoming). Moral Obligations: Actualist, Possibilist, or Hybridist? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    Do facts about what an agent would freely do in certain circumstances at least partly determine any of her moral obligations? Actualists answer ‘yes’, while possibilists answer ‘no’. We defend two novel hybrid accounts that are alternatives to actualism and possibilism: Dual Obligations Hybridism and Single Obligation Hybridism. By positing two moral ‘oughts’, each account retains the benefits of actualism and possibilism, yet is immune from the prima facie problems that face actualism and possibilism. We conclude by highlighting one substantive (...)
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  24.  17
    Brandon Warmke (forthcoming). The Normative Significance of Forgiveness. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    P.F. Strawson claimed that forgiveness is such an essential part of our moral practices that we could not extricate it from our form of life even if we so desired. But what is it about forgiveness that would make it such a central feature of our moral experience? In this paper, I suggest that the answer has to do with what I will call the normative significance of forgiveness. Forgiveness is normatively significant in the sense that, in its paradigmatic instances, (...)
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  25.  18
    Zach Weber, Guillermo Badia & Patrick Girard (forthcoming). What Is an Inconsistent Truth Table? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    ABSTRACTDo truth tables—the ordinary sort that we use in teaching and explaining basic propositional logic—require an assumption of consistency for their construction? In this essay we show that truth tables can be built in a consistency-independent paraconsistent setting, without any appeal to classical logic. This is evidence for a more general claim—that when we write down the orthodox semantic clauses for a logic, whatever logic we presuppose in the background will be the logic that appears in the foreground. Rather than (...)
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  26. Alex Worsnip (forthcoming). Belief, Credence, and the Preface Paradox. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    Many discussions of the “preface paradox” assume that it is more troubling for deductive constraints on rational belief if outright belief is reducible to credence. I show that this is an error: we can generate the problem without assuming such reducibility. All we need are some very weak normative assumptions about rational relationships between belief and credence. The only view that escapes my way of formulating the problem for the deductive closure constraint is in fact itself a (...)
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  27.  43
    Ru Ye (forthcoming). Misleading Evidence and the Dogmatism Puzzle. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-13.
    ABSTRACTAccording to the Dogmatism Puzzle presented by Gilbert Harman, knowledge induces dogmatism because, if one knows that p, one knows that any evidence against p is misleading and therefore one can ignore it when gaining the evidence in the future. I try to offer a new solution to the puzzle by explaining why the principle is false that evidence known to be misleading can be ignored. I argue that knowing that some evidence is misleading doesn't always damage the (...)
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  28. Bryan Frances (forthcoming). Presentism: Foreigner-Friendly or Xenophobic? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-10.
    I argue that for all we know there are perfectly ordinary actual entities that are temporal in the usual sense and yet never present, past, or future. This epistemic fact requires us to modify the theses of presentism and eternalism. More importantly, it generates three new and quite serious objections to presentism, which I formulate and partially evaluate in this paper.
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  29.  11
    John A. Keller (forthcoming). Paraphrase and the Symmetry Objection. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTThere is a puzzle about the use of paraphrase in philosophy, presented most famously in Alston's [1958] ‘Ontological Commitments’, but found throughout the literature. The puzzle arises from the fact that a symmetry required for a paraphrase to be successful seems to necessitate a symmetry sufficient for a paraphrase to fail, since any two expressions that stand in the means the same as relation must also stand in the has the same commitments as relation. I show that, while this problem (...)
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  30.  9
    Christian List & Daniel Stoljar (forthcoming). Does the Exclusion Argument Put Any Pressure on Dualism? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-13.
    ABSTRACTThe exclusion argument is widely thought to put considerable pressure on dualism, if not to refute it outright. We argue to the contrary that, whether or not their position is ultimately true, dualists have a plausible response. The response focuses on the notion of ‘distinctness’ that is employed to distinguish between mental and physical properties: if ‘distinctness’ is understood in one way, the exclusion principle on which the argument rests can be denied by the dualist; if it is understood in (...)
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  31.  4
    Michaelis Michael (forthcoming). Naming, Necessity, and More: Explorations in the Philosophical Work of Saul Kripke, Edited by Jonathan Berg. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  32.  4
    Sean Aas (forthcoming). Poverty, Agency, and Human Rights, Edited by Diana Meyers Tietjens. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  33.  5
    Robbie Arrell (forthcoming). The Robust Demands of the Good: Ethics with Attachment, Virtue, and Respect, by Philip Pettit. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  34.  7
    Derek Baker (forthcoming). Motivational Internalism, Edited by Gunnar Björnsson, Strandberg Caj, Ragnar Francén Olinder, John Eriksson, and Fredrik Björkland. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  35.  13
    Nathan Ballantyne (forthcoming). Verbal Disagreements and Philosophical Scepticism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTMany philosophers have suggested that disagreement is good grounds for scepticism. One response says that disagreement-motivated scepticism can be mitigated to some extent by the thesis that philosophical disputes are often verbal, not genuine. I consider the implications of this anti-sceptical strategy, arguing that it trades one kind of scepticism for others. I conclude with suggestions for further investigation of the epistemic significance of the nature of philosophical disagreement.
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  36.  4
    Idan Ben-Barak (forthcoming). Philosophy of Microbiology, by Maureen A. O'Malley. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  37.  2
    David Coady (forthcoming). A Critical Introduction to Testimony, by Axel Gelfert. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  38.  3
    Daniel Cohen (forthcoming). Responsibility From the Margins, by David Shoemaker. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  39.  4
    Richard Colledge (forthcoming). The Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Philosophy of Religion, Edited by Graham Oppy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  40.  4
    Christopher Cordner (forthcoming). Evil: A Philosophical Investigation, by Russell, Luke. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  41.  5
    Ramon Das (forthcoming). Bad News for Moral Error Theorists: There Is No Master Argument Against Companions in Guilt Strategies. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-12.
    ABSTRACTA ‘companions in guilt’ strategy against moral error theory aims to show that the latter proves too much: if sound, it supports an implausible error-theoretic conclusion in other areas such as epistemic or practical reasoning. Christopher Cowie [2016] has recently produced what he claims is a ‘master argument’ against all such strategies. The essence of his argument is that CG arguments cannot work because they are afflicted by internal incoherence or inconsistency. I argue, first, that Cowie's master argument does (...)
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  42.  14
    A. B. Dickerson (forthcoming). The Great Endarkenment: Philosophy for an Age of Hyperspecialization, by Elijah Millgram. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  43.  4
    Adam Dickerson (forthcoming). Frank Cioffi: The Philosopher in Shirt-Sleeves, by David Ellis. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  44.  10
    Travis Dumsday (forthcoming). Finitism and Divisibility: A Reply to Puryear. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-6.
    Puryear develops an objection against a prominent attempt to show that the universe must have a temporal beginning. Here I formulate a reply.
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  45.  11
    Don Fallis & Peter J. Lewis (forthcoming). The Brier Rule Is Not a Good Measure of Epistemic Utility. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    ABSTRACTMeasures of epistemic utility are used by formal epistemologists to make determinations of epistemic betterness among cognitive states. The Brier rule is the most popular choice among formal epistemologists for such a measure. In this paper, however, we show that the Brier rule is sometimes seriously wrong about whether one cognitive state is epistemically better than another. In particular, there are cases where an agent gets evidence that definitively eliminates a false hypothesis, but where the Brier rule says that things (...)
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  46. Joanne Faulkner (forthcoming). Historical Justice and Memory, Edited by Klaus Neumann and Janna Thompson. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  47.  6
    Paul Formosa (forthcoming). Means, Ends, and Persons: The Meaning and Psychological Dimensions of Kant's Humanity Formula, by Robert Audi. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  48.  1
    Carina Fourie (forthcoming). Reassessing Egalitarianis, by Jeremy Moss. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  49.  22
    Stacie Friend (forthcoming). The Real Foundation of Fictional Worlds. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTI argue that judgments of what is ‘true in a fiction’ presuppose the Reality Assumption: the assumption that everything that is true is fictionally the case, unless excluded by the work. By contrast with the more familiar Reality Principle, the Reality Assumption is not a rule for inferring implied content from what is explicit. Instead, it provides an array of real-world truths that can be used in such inferences. I claim that the Reality Assumption is essential to our ability to (...)
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  50.  3
    Stephanie Gibbons (forthcoming). Platonic Conversations, by Mary Margaret McCabe. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  51.  11
    Sanford C. Goldberg (forthcoming). Can Asserting That P Improve the Speaker's Epistemic Position ? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper I argue that there are cases in which a speaker S's observation of the fact that her assertion that p is accepted by another person enhances the strength of S's own epistemic position with respect to p, as compared to S's strength of epistemic position with respect to p prior to having made the assertion. I conclude by noting that the sorts of consideration that underwrite this possibility may go some distance towards explaining several aspects of our (...)
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  52.  11
    Kerah Gordon-Solmon (forthcoming). Ethics Without Intention, by Di Nucci, Ezio. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  53.  4
    Laura Gow (forthcoming). Sensorama: A Phenomenalist Analysis of Spacetime and its Contents, by Michael Pelczar. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  54.  2
    Daniel W. Harris (forthcoming). Metasemantics: New Essays on the Foundations of Meaning, Edited by Alexis Burgess and Brett Sherman. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  55.  6
    Johannes Himmelreich (forthcoming). The Paraphrase Argument Against Collective Actions. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    ABSTRACTThis paper is about the status of collective actions. According to one view, collective actions metaphysically reduce to individual actions because sentences about collective actions are merely a shorthand for sentences about individual actions. I reconstruct an argument for this view and show via counterexamples that it is not sound. The argument relies on a paraphrase procedure to unpack alleged shorthand sentences about collective actions into sentences about individual actions. I argue that the best paraphrase procedure that has been put (...)
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  56.  41
    Magdalena Balcerak Jackson (forthcoming). Knowledge First?, by McGlynn, Aidan. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  57.  1
    Diane Jeske (forthcoming). On Loyalty and Loyalties: The Contours of a Problematic Virtue, by John Kleinig. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  58.  3
    Jens Johansson (forthcoming). Review of Robert E. Goodin, On Settling (Princeton UP, 2012). [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
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  59.  29
    Neil Levy (forthcoming). Talking to Our Selves: Reflection, Ignorance, and Agency, by Doris, John M. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  60.  4
    Andrew Ter Ern Loke (forthcoming). On Finitism and the Beginning of the Universe: A Reply to Stephen Puryear. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-5.
    ABSTRACTStephen Puryear argues that William Lane Craig's view, that time as duration is logically prior to the potentially infinite divisions that we make of it, involves the idea that time is prior to any parts we conceive within it. He objects that PWT entails the Priority of the Whole with respect to Events, and that it subverts the argument, used by proponents of the Kalam Cosmological Argument such as Craig, against an eternal past based on the impossibility of traversing an (...)
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  61.  2
    Tony Lynch & Harout Akdedian (forthcoming). Secularism, Identity, and Enchantment, by Akeel Bilgrami. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  62.  3
    Cei Maslen (forthcoming). Ad Infinitum: New Essays on Epistemological Infinitism, Edited by Turri, John and Peter D. Klein. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  63.  8
    Toby Meadows (forthcoming). Rigor and Structure, by John P. Burgess. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  64.  9
    Michaelis Michael (forthcoming). A Companion To David Lewis, Edited by Barry Loewer and Jonathan Schaffer. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  65.  5
    Matthew J. Nestor (forthcoming). Narrow Structuralism: Paving a Middle Path Between Cummins and Millikan. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    ABSTRACTMillikan [2000] has levelled a number of persuasive criticisms against Cummins's [1996] theory of mental representation. In this paper, I pave a middle path in the debate between Cummins [2000] and Millikan [2000] to answer two questions. How are representations applied to targets? How is the content of a representation determined? The result is a new theory of mental representation, which I call narrow structuralism.
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  66.  5
    Christian Nimtz (forthcoming). Paradigm Terms: The Necessity of Kind Term Identifications Generalized. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    Standard Kripke-Putnam semantics is widely taken to entail that theoretical identifications like ‘Brontosauruses are Apatosauruses’ or ‘Gold is 79Au’ are necessary, if true. I offer a new diagnosis as to why this modal consequence ensues. Central to my diagnosis is the concept of a paradigm term. I argue that modal and epistemic peculiarities that are commonly considered as distinctive of natural kind expressions are in fact traits that are shared by paradigm terms in general. Philosophical semantics should broaden its focus (...)
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  67.  9
    Graham Oddie (forthcoming). Speech and Morality: On the Metaethical Implications of Speaking, by Cuneo, Terence. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  68.  16
    Grant Ramsey (forthcoming). The Causal Structure of Evolutionary Theory. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTOne contentious debate in the philosophy of biology is that between the statisticalists and causalists. The former understand core evolutionary concepts like fitness and selection to be mere statistical summaries of underlying causal processes. In this view, evolutionary changes cannot be causally explained by selection or fitness. The causalist side, on the other hand, holds that populations can change in response to selection—one can cite fitness differences or driftability in causal explanations of evolutionary change. But, on the causalist side, it (...)
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  69.  7
    John Ramsey (forthcoming). The Philosophical Challenge From China, Edited by Bruya, Brian. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  70.  11
    Stephen Read (forthcoming). Inferentialism: Why Rules Matter, by Jaroslav Peregrin. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  71.  16
    Paul Redding (forthcoming). From Empiricism to Expressivism: Brandom Reads Sellars, by Robert B. Brandom. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  72.  7
    M. W. Rowe (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Poetry, Edited by John Gibson. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  73.  18
    Luke Russell (forthcoming). Forgiving While Punishing. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    ABSTRACTHieronymi and Zaibert think that forgiving requires resolving not to inflict any further punishment. Murphy, Garrard, Allais, and Pettigrove suggest that it is always possible for a victim to forgive a perpetrator while continuing to punish. In this paper I defend a middle-ground position: the non-adversarial account of forgiveness, according to which forgiving is sometimes but not always compatible with continuing to punish. When the perpetrator accepts continued punishment, it is no obstacle to forgiveness. But if the victim (...)
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  74.  5
    Gabriel Sandu (forthcoming). Logic in Games, by van Benthem, Johan. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  75.  2
    Bart Schultz (forthcoming). British Ethical Theorists From Sidgwick to Ewing, by Hurka, Thomas. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  76.  2
    David Simpson (forthcoming). Assertion: On the Philosophical Significance of Assertoric Speech, by Sanford C. Goldberg. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  77.  9
    Vishnu Sridharan (forthcoming). When Manipulation Gets Personal. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    Many accounts of moral responsibility have emerged recently that question the importance of conscious choice for moral responsibility. Instead of this ‘volitional’ requirement, these ‘attributionist’ accounts claim that agents are responsible for their actions when their actions reflect who they are and what they value. This paper argues that attributionist accounts are too quick to dismiss the connection between volition and moral responsibility. By excising conscious control from their accounts, attributionists leave open the undesirable possibility that an agent may fulfil (...)
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  78.  25
    Philip Swenson (forthcoming). Ability, Foreknowledge, and Explanatory Dependence. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    Many philosophers maintain that the ability to do otherwise is compatible with comprehensive divine foreknowledge but incompatible with the truth of causal determinism. But the Fixity of the Past principle underlying the rejection of compatibilism about the ability to do otherwise and determinism appears to generate an argument also for the incompatibility of the ability to do otherwise and divine foreknowledge. By developing an account of ability that appeals to the notion of explanatory dependence, we can replace the Fixity of (...)
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  79.  8
    John Turri (forthcoming). Epistemic Contextualism: An Idle Hypothesis. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    ABSTRACTEpistemic contextualism is one of the most hotly debated topics in contemporary epistemology. Contextualists claim that ‘know’ is a context-sensitive verb associated with different evidential standards in different contexts. Contextualists motivate their view based on a set of behavioural claims. In this paper, I show that several of these behavioural claims are false. I also show that contextualist test cases suffer from a critical confound, which derives from people's tendency to defer to speakers’ statements about their own mental states. My (...)
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  80.  12
    Peter B. M. Vranas (forthcoming). Informative Aboutness. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-11.
    ABSTRACTPretheoretically, ‘all believers are immortal’ is about all believers, but B is not about any unbeliever. Similarly, ‘all mortals are unbelievers’ is not about any immortal, but M is about all mortals. But B and M are logically equivalent universal generalizations, so arguably they are about exactly the same objects; by, they are about those mortals who are unbelievers, contradicting. If one responds by giving up, is there still a sense in which B treats unbelievers differently from believers? I argue (...)
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  81.  4
    Nicole Wyatt (forthcoming). Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy, Edited by Gyula Klima. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  82.  4
    Nick Young (forthcoming). Hearing Spaces. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper I argue that empty space can be heard. This position contrasts with the generally held view that the only things that can be heard are sounds, their properties, echoes, and perhaps sound sources. Specifically, I suggest that when sounds reverberate in enclosed environments we auditorily represent the volume of space surrounding us. Clearly, we can learn the approximate size of an enclosed space through hearing a sound reverberate within it, and so any account that denies that we (...)
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