Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1.  35
    Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij (forthcoming). Review of Ernest Sosa, 'Judgment and Agency'. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  2. Sahar Akhtar (forthcoming). Stripping Citizenship: Does Membership Have its (Moral) Privileges? Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
  3.  18
    Renée Jorgensen Bolinger (forthcoming). Revisiting the Right to Do Wrong. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    Rights to do wrong are not necessary even within the framework of interest-based rights aimed at preserving autonomy. Agents can make morally significant choices and develop their moral character without a right to do wrong, so long as we allow that there can be moral variation within the set of actions that an agent is permitted to perform. Agents can also engage in non-trivial self-constitution in choosing between morally indifferent options, so long as there is adequate non-moral variation among the (...)
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  4.  9
    Nicolas Bommarito (forthcoming). Review of Knowing Better. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  5.  8
    Ben Bryan (forthcoming). Rights Forfeiture Theorists Should Embrace the Duty View of Punishment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-11.
    In this paper, I bring into conversation with each other two views about the justification of punishment: the rights forfeiture theory and the duty view. I argue that philosophers attracted to the former should instead accept the latter.
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  6.  8
    Patrick J. Connolly (forthcoming). The Idea of Power and Locke's Taxonomy of Ideas. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    Locke’s account of the idea of power is thought to be seriously problematic. Commentators allege (1) that the idea of power causes problems for Locke’s taxonomy of ideas, (2) that it is defined circularly, and (3) that contrary to Locke’s claims, it cannot be acquired in experience. This paper defends Locke’s account. Previous commentators have assumed that there is only one idea of power. But close attention to Locke’s text, combined with background features of Locke’s theory of ideas, supports the (...)
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  7.  20
    Ramon Das (forthcoming). Bad News for Moral Error Theorists: There Is No Master Argument Against Companions in Guilt Strategies. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-12.
    ABSTRACTA ‘companions in guilt’ strategy against moral error theory aims to show that the latter proves too much: if sound, it supports an implausible error-theoretic conclusion in other areas such as epistemic or practical reasoning. Christopher Cowie [2016] has recently produced what he claims is a ‘master argument’ against all such strategies. The essence of his argument is that CG arguments cannot work because they are afflicted by internal incoherence or inconsistency. I argue, first, that Cowie's master argument does not (...)
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  8.  28
    John Eriksson & Ragnar Francén Olinder (forthcoming). Non-Cognitivism and the Classification Account of Moral Uncertainty. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    ABSTRACTIt has been objected to moral non-cognitivism that it cannot account for fundamental moral uncertainty. A person is derivatively uncertain about whether an act is, say, morally wrong, when her certainty is at bottom due to uncertainty about whether the act has certain non-moral, descriptive, properties, which she takes to be wrong-making. She is fundamentally morally uncertain when her uncertainty directly concerns whether the properties of the act are wrong-making. In this paper we advance a new reply to the objection (...)
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  9.  25
    Paul Henne, Ángel Pinillos & Felipe De Brigard (forthcoming). Cause by Omission and Norm: Not Watering Plants. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    People generally accept that there is causation by omission—that the omission of some events cause some related events. But this acceptance elicits the selection problem, or the difficulty of explaining the selection of a particular omissive cause or class of causes from the causal conditions. Some theorists contend that dependence theories of causation cannot resolve this problem. In this paper, we argue that the appeal to norms adequately resolves the selection problem for dependence theories, and we provide novel experimental evidence (...)
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  10.  22
    Johannes Himmelreich (forthcoming). The Paraphrase Argument Against Collective Actions. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    ABSTRACTThis paper is about the status of collective actions. According to one view, collective actions metaphysically reduce to individual actions because sentences about collective actions are merely a shorthand for sentences about individual actions. I reconstruct an argument for this view and show via counterexamples that it is not sound. The argument relies on a paraphrase procedure to unpack alleged shorthand sentences about collective actions into sentences about individual actions. I argue that the best paraphrase procedure that has been put (...)
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  11.  31
    Alex Kaiserman (forthcoming). Causes and Counterparts. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-12.
    It follows from David Lewis's counterpart-theoretic analysis of modality and his counterfactual theory of causation that causal claims are relativized to a set of counterpart relations. Call this Shlewis's view. I show how Shlewis's view can provide attractively unified solutions to similar modal and causal puzzles. I then argue that Shlewis's view is better motivated, by his own lights, than the view Lewis actually held, and also better motivated than a similar approach which relativizes causal claims to sets of ‘contrast (...)
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  12.  8
    Melissa McBay Merritt (forthcoming). Manifest Reality: Kant's Idealism and His Realism, by Lucy Allais. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  13.  86
    Boaz Miller (forthcoming). Lackey, Jennifer, Ed. Essays in Collective Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, ‎‎2014, Pp. 253.‎. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
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  14.  11
    Tim Oakley (forthcoming). How to Release Oneself From an Obligation: Good News for Duties to Oneself. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-11.
    ABSTRACTIn some cases, you may release someone from some obligation they have to you. For instance, you may release them from a promise they made to you, or an obligation to repay money they have borrowed from you. But most take it as clear that, if you have an obligation to someone else, you cannot in any way release yourself from that obligation. I shall argue the contrary. The issue is important because one standard problem for the idea of having (...)
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  15.  11
    Michael Pace (forthcoming). Experiences, Seemings, and Perceptual Justification. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    ABSTRACTSeveral philosophers have distinguished between three distinct mental states that play a role in visual recognition: experiences, propositional seemings, and beliefs. I clarify and offer some reasons for drawing this three-fold distinction, and I consider its epistemological implications. Some philosophers have held that propositional seemings always confer prima facie justification, regardless of a particular seeming's relation to experience. I add to criticisms of this view in the literature by arguing that it fails to solve a version of the ‘problem of (...)
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  16.  33
    Andrew Peet (forthcoming). Referential Intentions and Communicative Luck. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-6.
    Brian Loar [1976] observed that communicative success with singular terms requires more than correct referent assignment. For communicative success to be achieved the audience must assign the right referent in the right way. Loar, and others since, took this to motivate Fregean accounts of the semantics of singular terms. Ray Buchanan [2014] has recently responded, maintaining that although Loar is correct to claim that communicative success with singular terms requires more than correct referent assignment, this is compatible with direct reference (...)
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  17.  77
    Douglas W. Portmore (forthcoming). Uncertainty, Indeterminacy, and Agent-Centered Constraints. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    Commonsense morality includes various agent-centered constraints, including ones against killing unnecessarily, breaking a promise, and punishing the innocent. However, it’s not always clear whether, had an agent φ-ed, she would have violated a constraint. And sometimes the reason for this is not that we lack knowledge of the relevant facts, but that there is no fact about whether her φ-ing would have constituted a constraint-violation. What, then, is a constraint-accepting theory (i.e., a theory that accepts that there are such constraints) (...)
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  18.  11
    H. Orri Stefánsson (forthcoming). What is "Real" in Probabilism? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    This paper defends two related claims about belief. First, the claim that unlike numerical degrees of belief, comparative beliefs are primitive and psychologically real. Second, the claim that the fundamental norm of Probabilism is not that numerical degrees of belief should satisfy the probability axioms, but rather that comparative beliefs should satisfy certain constraints.
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  19. Daniel Stoljar & Christian List (forthcoming). Does the Exclusion Argument Put Any Pressure on Dualism? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-13.
    The exclusion argument is widely thought to put considerable pressure on dualism if not to refute it outright. We argue to the contrary that, whether or not their position is ultimately true, dualists have a plausible response. The response focuses on the notion of ‘distinctness’ as it occurs in the argument: if 'distinctness' is understood one way, the exclusion principle on which the argument is founded can be denied by the dualist; if it is understood another way, the argument is (...)
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  20.  24
    Shelley Tremain (forthcoming). Review of The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability by Elizabeth Barnes. Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
  21.  15
    Nick Young (forthcoming). Hearing Spaces. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper I argue that empty space can be heard. This position contrasts with the generally held view that the only things that can be heard are sounds, their properties, echoes, and perhaps sound sources. Specifically, I suggest that when sounds reverberate in enclosed environments we auditorily represent the volume of space surrounding us. Clearly, we can learn the approximate size of an enclosed space through hearing a sound reverberate within it, and so any account that denies that we (...)
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  22.  24
    John A. Keller (forthcoming). Paraphrase and the Symmetry Objection. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTThere is a puzzle about the use of paraphrase in philosophy, presented most famously in Alston's [1958] ‘Ontological Commitments’, but found throughout the literature. The puzzle arises from the fact that a symmetry required for a paraphrase to be successful seems to necessitate a symmetry sufficient for a paraphrase to fail, since any two expressions that stand in the means the same as relation must also stand in the has the same commitments as relation. I show that, while this problem (...)
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  23.  9
    Robbie Arrell (forthcoming). The Robust Demands of the Good: Ethics with Attachment, Virtue, and Respect, by Philip Pettit. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  24.  14
    Derek Ball (forthcoming). The Myth of the Intuitive: Experimental Philosophy and Philosophical Method, by Max Deutsch. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  25.  7
    Dirk Baltzly (forthcoming). Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato, Edited by Nails, Debra, and Harold Tarrant. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  26.  12
    Paul Bartha & C. Tyler DesRoches (forthcoming). The Relatively Infinite Value of the Environment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-26.
    ABSTRACTSome environmental ethicists and economists argue that attributing infinite value to the environment is a good way to represent an absolute obligation to protect it. Others argue against modelling the value of the environment in this way: the assignment of infinite value leads to immense technical and philosophical difficulties that undermine the environmentalist project. First, there is a problem of discrimination: saving a large region of habitat is better than saving a small region; yet if both outcomes have infinite value, (...)
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  27.  4
    Deborah Boyle (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Mary Astell: An Early Modern Theory of Virtue, by Jacqueline Broad. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
  28.  7
    James M. Bucknell (forthcoming). Potentiality: From Dispositions to Modality, by Barbara Vetter. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  29.  3
    Monima Chadha (forthcoming). Matilal, B.K. The Collected Essays of Bimal Krishna Matilal Volume I: Mind, Language and World, The Collected Essays of Bimal Krishna Matilal Volume II: Ethics and Epics, Ed. Jonardon Ganeri. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-2.
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  30.  4
    Michael Cholbi (forthcoming). Taking Life: Three Theories on the Ethics of Killing, by Torbjörn Tännsjö. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  31.  17
    Chris Daly (forthcoming). What Kind of Creatures Are We?, by Noam Chomsky. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  32.  5
    Adam Dickerson (forthcoming). Frank Cioffi: The Philosopher in Shirt-Sleeves, by David Ellis. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  33.  3
    Joanne Faulkner (forthcoming). Historical Justice and Memory, Edited by Klaus Neumann and Janna Thompson. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  34.  12
    Paul Formosa (forthcoming). Means, Ends, and Persons: The Meaning and Psychological Dimensions of Kant's Humanity Formula, by Robert Audi. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  35.  7
    Nir Fresco (forthcoming). Physical Computation: A Mechanistic Account, by Gualtiero Piccinini. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  36.  28
    Stacie Friend (forthcoming). The Real Foundation of Fictional Worlds. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTI argue that judgments of what is ‘true in a fiction’ presuppose the Reality Assumption: the assumption that everything that is true is fictionally the case, unless excluded by the work. By contrast with the more familiar Reality Principle, the Reality Assumption is not a rule for inferring implied content from what is explicit. Instead, it provides an array of real-world truths that can be used in such inferences. I claim that the Reality Assumption is essential to our ability to (...)
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  37.  10
    Paweł Garbacz (forthcoming). Slot Mereology Revised. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-7.
    The paper suggests two revisions of K. Bennett's system of slot mereology. The revisions do not touch on the philosophical rationale for this system, but are focused on certain logical deficiencies in her formalisation.
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  38.  5
    Stephanie Gibbons (forthcoming). Platonic Conversations, by Mary Margaret McCabe. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  39.  19
    Sanford C. Goldberg (forthcoming). Can Asserting That P Improve the Speaker's Epistemic Position ? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper I argue that there are cases in which a speaker S's observation of the fact that her assertion that p is accepted by another person enhances the strength of S's own epistemic position with respect to p, as compared to S's strength of epistemic position with respect to p prior to having made the assertion. I conclude by noting that the sorts of consideration that underwrite this possibility may go some distance towards explaining several aspects of our (...)
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  40.  9
    Laura Gow (forthcoming). Sensorama: A Phenomenalist Analysis of Spacetime and its Contents, by Michael Pelczar. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  41.  3
    Christopher Hamilton (forthcoming). The Aesthetics of Argument, by Martin Warner. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  42.  5
    Daniel W. Harris (forthcoming). Metasemantics: New Essays on the Foundations of Meaning, Edited by Alexis Burgess and Brett Sherman. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  43.  4
    Jens Johansson (forthcoming). Review of Robert E. Goodin, On Settling (Princeton UP, 2012). [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
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  44.  8
    Matthew Kopec (forthcoming). Reasons Without Persons: Rationality, Identity, and Time, by Brian Hedden. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  45.  6
    Pat Lewtas (forthcoming). The Impossibility of Emergent Conscious Causal Powers. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-13.
    ABSTRACTThis paper argues that emergent conscious properties can't bestow emergent causal powers. It supports this conclusion by way of a dilemma. Necessarily, an emergent conscious property brings about its effects actively or other than actively. If actively, then, the paper argues, the emergent conscious property can't have causal powers at all. And if other than actively, then, the paper argues, the emergentist finds himself committed to incompatible accounts of causation.
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  46.  3
    Tony Lynch & Harout Akdedian (forthcoming). Secularism, Identity, and Enchantment, by Akeel Bilgrami. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  47.  10
    Jason Marsh (forthcoming). Debating Procreation: Is It Wrong to Reproduce? By David Benatar and David Wasserman. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  48.  9
    Toby Meadows (forthcoming). Rigor and Structure, by John P. Burgess. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  49.  11
    Michaelis Michael (forthcoming). A Companion To David Lewis, Edited by Barry Loewer and Jonathan Schaffer. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  50.  3
    Boaz Miller (forthcoming). Essays in Collective Epistemology, Edited by Jennifer Lackey. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  51.  6
    Matthew J. Nestor (forthcoming). Narrow Structuralism: Paving a Middle Path Between Cummins and Millikan. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    ABSTRACTMillikan [2000] has levelled a number of persuasive criticisms against Cummins's [1996] theory of mental representation. In this paper, I pave a middle path in the debate between Cummins [2000] and Millikan [2000] to answer two questions. How are representations applied to targets? How is the content of a representation determined? The result is a new theory of mental representation, which I call narrow structuralism.
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  52.  15
    Christian Nimtz (forthcoming). Paradigm Terms: The Necessity of Kind Term Identifications Generalized. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    Standard Kripke-Putnam semantics is widely taken to entail that theoretical identifications like ‘Brontosauruses are Apatosauruses’ or ‘Gold is 79Au’ are necessary, if true. I offer a new diagnosis as to why this modal consequence ensues. Central to my diagnosis is the concept of a paradigm term. I argue that modal and epistemic peculiarities that are commonly considered as distinctive of natural kind expressions are in fact traits that are shared by paradigm terms in general. Philosophical semantics should broaden its focus (...)
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  53.  12
    Mikael Pettersson (forthcoming). Capturing Shadows: On Photography, Causation, and Absences. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTMany photographs seem to be images of absences: for instance, a photograph of a shadow seems to be an image of an absence, as shadows are plausibly thought of as being absences of light. Absence photography is puzzling, however, as, first, it is a common idea that photographs can only be images of things that have caused them, and, second, it is unclear whether absences can cause anything. In this paper, I look at various ways to unravel the puzzle. Along (...)
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  54.  11
    M. W. Rowe (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Poetry, Edited by John Gibson. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  55.  5
    Anne Schwenkenbecher (forthcoming). Cosmopolitanism Versus Non-Cosmopolitanism: Critiques, Defenses, Reconceptualizations, Edited by Gillian Brock. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  56.  13
    John Schwenkler (forthcoming). Action, Knowledge, and Will, by John Hyman. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  57.  4
    David Simpson (forthcoming). Assertion: On the Philosophical Significance of Assertoric Speech, by Sanford C. Goldberg. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  58.  26
    Nicholas F. Stang (forthcoming). The Poverty of Conceptual Truth: Kant's Analytic/Synthetic Distinction and the Limits of Metaphysics, by R. Lanier Anderson. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  59.  10
    Andreas Stokke (forthcoming). Proposing, Pretending, and Propriety: A Response to Don Fallis. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-6.
    ABSTRACTThis note responds to criticism put forth by Don Fallis of an account of lying in terms of the Stalnakerian view of assertion. According to this account, to lie is to say something one believes to be false and thereby propose that it become common ground. Fallis objects by presenting an example to show that one can lie even though one does not propose to make what one says common ground. It is argued here that this objection does not present (...)
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  60.  24
    John Sutton (forthcoming). The Centered Mind: What the Science of Working Memory Shows Us About the Nature of Human Thought, by Peter, Carruthers. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-2.
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  61.  17
    John Turri (forthcoming). Epistemic Contextualism: An Idle Hypothesis. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    ABSTRACTEpistemic contextualism is one of the most hotly debated topics in contemporary epistemology. Contextualists claim that ‘know’ is a context-sensitive verb associated with different evidential standards in different contexts. Contextualists motivate their view based on a set of behavioural claims. In this paper, I show that several of these behavioural claims are false. I also show that contextualist test cases suffer from a critical confound, which derives from people's tendency to defer to speakers’ statements about their own mental states. My (...)
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  62.  16
    Peter B. M. Vranas (forthcoming). Informative Aboutness. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-11.
    ABSTRACTPretheoretically, ‘all believers are immortal’ is about all believers, but B is not about any unbeliever. Similarly, ‘all mortals are unbelievers’ is not about any immortal, but M is about all mortals. But B and M are logically equivalent universal generalizations, so arguably they are about exactly the same objects; by, they are about those mortals who are unbelievers, contradicting. If one responds by giving up, is there still a sense in which B treats unbelievers differently from believers? I argue (...)
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  63.  3
    Anik Waldow (forthcoming). Ideas, Evidence, and Method: Hume's Skepticism and Naturalism Concerning Knowledge and Causation, by Graciela De Pierris. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  64.  8
    Scott Woodcock (forthcoming). When Will a Consequentialist Push You in Front of a Trolley? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    As the trolley problem runs its course, consequentialists tend to adopt one of two strategies: silently take comfort in the fact that deontological rivals face their own enduring difficulties, or appeal to cognitive psychology to discredit the deontological intuitions on which the trolley problem depends. I refer to the first strategy as silent schadenfreude and the second as debunking attack. My aim in this paper is to argue that consequentialists ought to reject both strategies and instead opt for what I (...)
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  65.  9
    Nicole Wyatt (forthcoming). Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy, Edited by Gyula Klima. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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