Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1.  31
    Marcus Arvan (forthcoming). Transformative Experience, by L.A. Paul. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  2.  3
    Derek Baker (forthcoming). Review of 'Motivational Internalism', Eds. G. Björnsson, C. Strandberg, R. Francén Olinder, J. Eriksson, and F. Björklund. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  3.  10
    Galen Barry (forthcoming). Spinoza and the Feeling of Freedom. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    ABSTRACTWe seem to have a direct experience of our freedom when we act. Many philosophers take this feeling of freedom as evidence that we possess libertarian free will. Spinoza denies that we have free will of any sort, although he admits that we nonetheless feel free. Commentators often attribute to him what I call the ‘Negative Account’ of the feeling: it results from the fact that we are conscious of our actions but ignorant of their causes. I argue (...)
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  4.  12
    Saba Bazargan (forthcoming). Defensive Killing, by Frowe, Helen. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
  5. Olle Blomberg (forthcoming). Common Knowledge and Reductionism About Shared Agency. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-12.
    Most reductionist accounts of intentional joint action include a condition that it must be common knowledge between participants that they have certain intentions and beliefs that cause and coordinate the joint action. However, this condition has typically simply been taken for granted rather than argued for. The condition is not necessary for ensuring that participants are jointly responsible for the action in which each participates, nor for ensuring that each treats the others as partners rather than as social tools. It (...)
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  6.  21
    Lajos L. Brons (forthcoming). Engaging Buddhism: Why It Matters to Philosophy. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
  7. Richard Yetter Chappell & Helen Yetter-Chappell (forthcoming). Virtue and Salience. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    This paper explores two ways that evaluations of an agent’s character as virtuous or vicious are properly influenced by what the agent finds salient or attention-grabbing. First, we argue that ignoring salient needs reveals a greater deficit of benevolent motivation in the agent, and hence renders them more blameworthy. We use this fact to help explain our ordinary intuition that failing to give to famine relief (for example) is in some sense less bad than failing to help a drowning child (...)
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  8.  10
    Alison Fernandes (forthcoming). Varieties of Epistemic Freedom. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    When we deliberate about what to do, we appear to be free to decide on different options. Three accounts use ordinary beliefs to explain this apparent freedom—appealing to different types of ‘epistemic freedom’. When an agent has epistemic freedom, her evidence while deliberating does not determine what decision she makes. This ‘epistemic gap’ between her evidence and decision explains why her decision appears free. The varieties of epistemic freedom appealed to might look similar. But there is an important difference. Two (...)
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  9.  69
    Robert K. Garcia (forthcoming). Tropes as Character-Grounders. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    There is a largely unrecognized ambiguity concerning the nature of a trope. Disambiguation throws into relief two fundamentally different conceptions of a trope and provides two ways to understand and develop each metaphysical theory that put tropes to use. In this paper I consider the relative merits that result from differences concerning a trope’s ability to ground the character of ordinary objects. I argue that on each conception of a trope, there are unique implications and challenges concerning character-grounding.
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  10.  37
    Tyler Hildebrand (forthcoming). Two Types of Quidditism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    According to structuralism, all natural properties are individuated by their roles in causal/nomological structures. According to quidditism, at least some natural properties are individuated in some other way. Because these theses deal with the identities of natural properties, this distinction cuts to the core of a serious metaphysical dispute: Are the intrinsic natures of all natural properties essentially causal/nomological in character? I'll argue that the answer is ‘no’, or at least that this answer is more plausible than many critics of (...)
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  11.  9
    Greg Janzen (forthcoming). 'Brain-Malfunction' Cases and the Dispositionalist Reply to Frankfurt's Attack on PAP. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-12.
    Harry Frankfurt has famously argued against the principle of alternate possibilities (PAP) by presenting a case in which, apparently, a person is morally responsible for what he has done even though he could not have done otherwise. A number of commentators have proposed dispositionalist responses to Frankfurt, arguing that he has not produced a counterexample to PAP because, contrary to appearances, the ability to do otherwise is indeed present but is a disposition that has been ‘masked’ or ‘finked’ by the (...)
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  12.  15
    Joongol Kim (forthcoming). What Are Quantities? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    ABSTRACTThis paper presents a view of quantities as ‘adverbial’ entities of a certain kind—more specifically, determinate ways, or modes, of having length, mass, speed, and the like. In doing so, it will be argued that quantities as such should be distinguished from quantitative properties or relations, and are not universals but are particulars, although they are not objects, either. A main advantage of the adverbial view over its rivals will be found in its superior explanatory power with respect to both (...)
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  13.  27
    Roberto Loss (forthcoming). Parts Ground the Whole and Are Identical to It. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-10.
    What is the relation between parts taken together and the whole that they compose? The recent literature appears to be dominated by two different answers to this question, which are normally thought of as being incompatible. According to the first, parts taken together are identical to the whole that they compose. According to the second, the whole is grounded in its parts. The aim of this paper is to make some theoretical room for the view according to which parts ground (...)
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  14.  50
    Joshua May (forthcoming). Review of Bound: Essays on Free Will and Responsibility, by Shaun Nichols. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
  15.  19
    Rafe McGregor (forthcoming). Narrative Representation and Phenomenological Knowledge. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that narrative representations can provide knowledge in virtue of their narrativity, regardless of their truth value. I set out the question in section 1, distinguishing narrative cognitivism from aesthetic cognitivism and narrative representations from non-narrative representations. Sections 2 and 3 argue that exemplary narratives can provide lucid phenomenological knowledge, which appears to meet both the epistemic and narrativity criteria for the narrative cognitivist thesis. In section 4, I turn to non-narrative representation, focusing (...)
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  16.  10
    Rekha Nath (forthcoming). George Sher, Equality for Inegalitarians. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
    What are society’s distributive obligations to its members? The central contribution of this book lies in its novel response to this question.
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  17.  14
    Rekha Nath (forthcoming). Equality for Inegalitarians, by George Sher. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
    What are society's distributive obligations to its members? The central contribution of this book lies in its novel response to this question. The response is hard to classify. In featuring a largely hands-off government and allowing for significant material inequality, Sher's vision of a just society has a distinctively (right-)libertarian flavour. However, he does not give an historical account of legitimate holdings. Indeed, he embraces a commitment that suggests an allegiance with liberal egalitarians: namely, that a society owes to its (...)
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  18.  17
    Nathaniel Sharadin (forthcoming). Nothing but the Evidential Considerations? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-19.
    A number of philosophers have claimed that non-evidential considerations cannot play a role in doxastic deliberation as motivating reasons to believe a proposition. This claim, interesting in its own right, naturally lends itself to use in a range of arguments for a wide array of substantive philosophical theses. I argue, by way of a counterexample, that the claim to which all these arguments appeal is false. I then consider and reply to seven objections to my counterexample. Finally, as a way (...)
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  19.  52
    Matt Stichter (forthcoming). Practical Skills and Practical Wisdom in Virtue. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTThis paper challenges a frequent objection to conceptualizing virtues as skills, which is that skills are merely capacities to act well, while virtues additionally require being properly motivated to act well. I discuss several cases that purport to show the supposed motivational difference by drawing our attention to the differing intuitions we have about virtues and skills. However, this putative difference between virtue and skill disappears when we switch our focus in the skill examples from the performance to the (...)
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  20.  18
    Weng Hong Tang (forthcoming). Reliabilism and the Suspension of Belief. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    What are the conditions under which suspension of belief—or suspension, for short—is justified? Process reliabilists hold that our beliefs are justified if and only if these are produced or sustained by reliable cognitive processes. But they have said relatively little about suspension. Perhaps they think that we may easily extend an account of justified belief to deal with justified suspension. But it's not immediately clear how we may do so; in which case, evidentialism has a distinct advantage over reliabilism. In (...)
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  21.  5
    Brandon Warmke (forthcoming). The Normative Significance of Forgiveness. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    P.F. Strawson claimed that forgiveness is such an essential part of our moral practices that we could not extricate it from our form of life even if we so desired. But what is it about forgiveness that would make it such a central feature of our moral experience? In this paper, I suggest that the answer has to do with what I will call the normative significance of forgiveness. Forgiveness is normatively significant in the sense that, in its paradigmatic instances, (...)
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  22.  14
    Zach Weber, Guillermo Badia & Patrick Girard (forthcoming). What Is an Inconsistent Truth Table? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    ABSTRACTDo truth tables—the ordinary sort that we use in teaching and explaining basic propositional logic—require an assumption of consistency for their construction? In this essay we show that truth tables can be built in a consistency-independent paraconsistent setting, without any appeal to classical logic. This is evidence for a more general claim—that when we write down the orthodox semantic clauses for a logic, whatever logic we presuppose in the background will be the logic that appears in the foreground. Rather than (...)
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  23.  18
    Nick Wiltsher (forthcoming). Against the Additive View of Imagination. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    According to the additive view of sensory imagination, mental imagery often involves two elements. There is an image-like element, which gives the experiences qualitative phenomenal character akin to that of perception. There is also a non-image element, consisting of something like suppositions about the image's object. This accounts for extra-sensory features of imagined objects and situations: for example, it determines whether an image of a grey horse is an image of Desert Orchid, or of some other grey horse. The view (...)
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  24.  86
    Alex Worsnip (forthcoming). Belief, Credence, and the Preface Paradox. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    Many discussions of the “preface paradox” assume that it is more troubling for deductive constraints on rational belief if outright belief is reducible to credence. I show that this is an error: we can generate the problem without assuming such reducibility. All we need are some very weak normative assumptions about rational relationships between belief and credence. The only view that escapes my way of formulating the problem for the deductive closure constraint is in fact (...)
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  25.  25
    Ru Ye (forthcoming). Misleading Evidence and the Dogmatism Puzzle. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-13.
    ABSTRACTAccording to the Dogmatism Puzzle presented by Gilbert Harman, knowledge induces dogmatism because, if one knows that p, one knows that any evidence against p is misleading and therefore one can ignore it when gaining the evidence in the future. I try to offer a new solution to the puzzle by explaining why the principle is false that evidence known to be misleading can be ignored. I argue that knowing that some evidence is misleading doesn't always (...)
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  26.  96
    Bryan Frances (forthcoming). Presentism: Foreigner-Friendly or Xenophobic? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-10.
    I argue that for all we know there are perfectly ordinary actual entities that are temporal in the usual sense and yet never present, past, or future. This epistemic fact requires us to modify the theses of presentism and eternalism. More importantly, it generates three new and quite serious objections to presentism, which I formulate and partially evaluate in this paper.
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  27.  3
    Sean Aas (forthcoming). Poverty, Agency, and Human Rights, Edited by Diana Meyers Tietjens. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  28.  11
    Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij (forthcoming). Judgment and Agency, by Ernest Sosa. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  29.  17
    Andrew M. Bailey (forthcoming). Persons, Animals, Ourselves, by Paul F. Snowdon. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  30.  2
    Idan Ben-Barak (forthcoming). Philosophy of Microbiology, by Maureen A. O'Malley. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  31.  15
    Hagit Benbaji (forthcoming). Why Colour Primitivism? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-23.
    Primitivism is the view that colors are sui generis properties of physical objects. The basic insight underlying primitivism is that colours are as we see them, i.e. they are categorical properties of physical objects—simple, monadic, constant, etc.—just like shapes. As such, they determine the content of colour experience. Accepting the premise that colours are sui generis properties of physical objects, this paper seeks to show that ascribing primitive properties to objects is, ipso facto, ascribing to objects irreducible dispositions to look (...)
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  32.  2
    Daniel Cohen (forthcoming). Responsibility From the Margins, by David Shoemaker. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  33.  3
    Richard Colledge (forthcoming). The Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Philosophy of Religion, Edited by Graham Oppy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  34.  3
    Christopher Cordner (forthcoming). Evil: A Philosophical Investigation, by Russell, Luke. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  35.  11
    A. B. Dickerson (forthcoming). The Great Endarkenment: Philosophy for an Age of Hyperspecialization, by Elijah Millgram. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  36.  5
    Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic (forthcoming). Physical Computation and Cognitive Science, by Nir Fresco. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  37.  7
    Travis Dumsday (forthcoming). Finitism and Divisibility: A Reply to Puryear. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-6.
    Puryear develops an objection against a prominent attempt to show that the universe must have a temporal beginning. Here I formulate a reply.
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  38.  11
    Don Fallis & Peter J. Lewis (forthcoming). The Brier Rule Is Not a Good Measure of Epistemic Utility. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    ABSTRACTMeasures of epistemic utility are used by formal epistemologists to make determinations of epistemic betterness among cognitive states. The Brier rule is the most popular choice among formal epistemologists for such a measure. In this paper, however, we show that the Brier rule is sometimes seriously wrong about whether one cognitive state is epistemically better than another. In particular, there are cases where an agent gets evidence that definitively eliminates a false hypothesis, but where the Brier rule says that things (...)
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  39.  1
    Carina Fourie (forthcoming). Reassessing Egalitarianis, by Jeremy Moss. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  40.  11
    Alberto Giubilini (forthcoming). What in the World is Moral Disgust? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    I argue that much philosophical discussion of moral disgust suffers from two ambiguities: first, it is not clear whether arguments for the moral authority of disgust apply to disgust as a consequence of moral evaluations or instead to disgust as a moralizing emotion; second, it is not clear whether the word ‘moral’ is used in a normative or in a descriptive sense. This lack of clarity generates confusion between ‘fittingness’ and ‘appropriateness’ of disgust. I formulate three conditions that arguments for (...)
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  41.  31
    Stephen Hetherington (forthcoming). Empty Ideas: A Critique of Analytic Philosophy, by Peter Unger. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  42.  12
    Torfinn Thomesen Huvenes & Andreas Stokke (forthcoming). Information Centrism and the Nature of Contexts. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    Information Centrism is the view that contexts consist of information that can be characterized in terms of the propositional attitudes of the conversational participants. Furthermore, it claims that this notion of context is the only one needed for linguistic theorizing about context-sensitive languages. We argue that Information Centrism is false, since it cannot account correctly for facts about truth and reference in certain cases involving indexicals and demonstratives. Consequently, contexts cannot be construed simply as collections of shared information.
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  43.  31
    Magdalena Balcerak Jackson (forthcoming). Knowledge First?, by McGlynn, Aidan. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  44.  3
    Jens Johansson (forthcoming). Review of Robert E. Goodin, On Settling (Princeton UP, 2012). [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
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  45.  5
    David Kolb (forthcoming). Self-Consciousness and the Critique of the Subject: Hegel, Heidegger, and the Poststructuralists, by Simon Lumsden. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  46.  16
    Tamar Lando (forthcoming). Conclusive Reasons and Epistemic Luck. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    What is it to have conclusive reasons to believe a proposition P? According to a view famously defended by Dretske, a reason R is conclusive for P just in case [R would not be the case unless P were the case]. I argue that, while knowing that P is plausibly related to having conclusive reasons to believe that P, having such reasons cannot be understood in terms of the truth of this counterfactual condition. Simple examples show that (...)
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  47.  17
    Stephen Law (forthcoming). Natural Kinds of Substance. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    This paper presents an extension of Putnam's account of how substance terms such as ‘water’ and ‘gold’ function and of how a posteriori necessary truths concerning the underlying microstructures of such kinds may be derived. The paper has three aims. I aim to refute a familiar criticism of Putnam's account: that it presupposes what Salmon calls an ‘irredeemably metaphysical, and philosophically controversial, theory of essentialism’. I show how all of the details of Putnam's account—including those that Salmon believes smuggle in (...)
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  48.  9
    Seth Lazar (forthcoming). Authorization and The Morality of War. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    Why does it matter that those who fight wars be authorized by the communities on whose behalf they claim to fight? I argue that lacking authorization generates a moral cost, which counts against a war's proportionality, and that having authorization allows the transfer of reasons from the members of the community to those who fight, which makes the war more likely to be proportionate. If democratic states are better able than non-democratic states and sub-state groups to gain their community's authorization, (...)
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  49.  12
    Samuel Levey (forthcoming). Leibniz's Principle of Identity of Indiscernibles, by Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  50.  24
    Neil Levy (forthcoming). Talking to Our Selves: Reflection, Ignorance, and Agency, by Doris, John M. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  51.  3
    Andrew Ter Ern Loke (forthcoming). On Finitism and the Beginning of the Universe: A Reply to Stephen Puryear. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-5.
    ABSTRACTStephen Puryear argues that William Lane Craig's view, that time as duration is logically prior to the potentially infinite divisions that we make of it, involves the idea that time is prior to any parts we conceive within it. He objects that PWT entails the Priority of the Whole with respect to Events, and that it subverts the argument, used by proponents of the Kalam Cosmological Argument such as Craig, against an eternal past based on the impossibility of traversing an (...)
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  52.  3
    Cei Maslen (forthcoming). Ad Infinitum: New Essays on Epistemological Infinitism, Edited by Turri, John and Peter D. Klein. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  53.  6
    Fred D. Miller Jr (forthcoming). Aristotle on the Nature of Community, by Adriel M. Trott. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  54.  6
    Graham Oddie (forthcoming). Speech and Morality: On the Metaethical Implications of Speaking, by Cuneo, Terence. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  55.  3
    Michael J. Olson (forthcoming). Locke's Touchy Subjects: Materialism and Immortality, by Nicholas Jolley. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  56.  9
    Grant Ramsey (forthcoming). The Causal Structure of Evolutionary Theory. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTOne contentious debate in the philosophy of biology is that between the statisticalists and causalists. The former understand core evolutionary concepts like fitness and selection to be mere statistical summaries of underlying causal processes. In this view, evolutionary changes cannot be causally explained by selection or fitness. The causalist side, on the other hand, holds that populations can change in response to selection—one can cite fitness differences or driftability in causal explanations of evolutionary change. But, on the causalist side, it (...)
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  57.  7
    John Ramsey (forthcoming). The Philosophical Challenge From China, Edited by Bruya, Brian. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  58.  10
    Stephen Read (forthcoming). Inferentialism: Why Rules Matter, by Jaroslav Peregrin. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  59.  13
    Paul Redding (forthcoming). From Empiricism to Expressivism: Brandom Reads Sellars, by Robert B. Brandom. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  60.  3
    Gabriel Sandu (forthcoming). Logic in Games, by van Benthem, Johan. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  61.  2
    Bart Schultz (forthcoming). British Ethical Theorists From Sidgwick to Ewing, by Hurka, Thomas. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  62.  6
    Vishnu Sridharan (forthcoming). When Manipulation Gets Personal. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    Many accounts of moral responsibility have emerged recently that question the importance of conscious choice for moral responsibility. Instead of this ‘volitional’ requirement, these ‘attributionist’ accounts claim that agents are responsible for their actions when their actions reflect who they are and what they value. This paper argues that attributionist accounts are too quick to dismiss the connection between volition and moral responsibility. By excising conscious control from their accounts, attributionists leave open the undesirable possibility that an agent may fulfil (...)
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  63.  17
    Philip Swenson (forthcoming). Ability, Foreknowledge, and Explanatory Dependence. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    Many philosophers maintain that the ability to do otherwise is compatible with comprehensive divine foreknowledge but incompatible with the truth of causal determinism. But the Fixity of the Past principle underlying the rejection of compatibilism about the ability to do otherwise and determinism appears to generate an argument also for the incompatibility of the ability to do otherwise and divine foreknowledge. By developing an account of ability that appeals to the notion of explanatory dependence, we can replace the Fixity of (...)
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  64.  22
    Travis Timmerman & Yishai Cohen (forthcoming). Moral Obligations: Actualist, Possibilist, or Hybridist? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    ABSTRACTDo facts about what an agent would freely do in certain circumstances at least partly determine any of her moral obligations? Actualists answer ‘yes’, while possibilists answer ‘no’. We defend two novel hybrid accounts that are alternatives to actualism and possibilism: Dual Obligations Hybridism and Single Obligation Hybridism. By positing two moral ‘oughts’, each account retains the benefits of actualism and possibilism, yet is immune from the prima facie problems that face actualism and possibilism. We conclude by highlighting one substantive (...)
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  65.  14
    Barry Ward (forthcoming). Modality and Explanatory Reasoning, by Boris Kment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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