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Forthcoming articles
  1.  67
    Alfred Archer (forthcoming). On Sporting Integrity. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-15.
    It has become increasingly popular for sports fans, pundits, coaches and players to appeal to ideas of ‘sporting integrity’ when voicing their approval or disapproval of some aspect of the sporting world. My goal in this paper will be to examine whether there is any way to understand this idea in a way that both makes sense of the way in which it is used and presents a distinctly ‘sporting’ form of integrity. I will look at three recent high profile (...)
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  2. Kenneth Aggerholm (forthcoming). Get the Last Laugh: On the Humourist as a Developmental Ideal in Invasion Games. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy.
     
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  3.  4
    Christina Conroy (forthcoming). The Phenomenology of Dance. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-4.
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  4.  3
    Leon Culbertson (forthcoming). Scylla and Charybdis: The Purist’s Dilemma. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-22.
    This paper explores the view that, on Mumford’s account of the purist, to the degree that the purist adopts an aesthetic perspective, he or she doesn’t watch the sport in question, and to the degree that he or she does watch the sport, there is a loss of aesthetic appreciation. The idea that spectators oscillate between partisanship and purism means that the purist is unable to avoid either the Scylla of not actually watching the sport, or the Charybdis of loss (...)
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  5.  10
    Colleen English (forthcoming). Philosophy of Sport: Critical Concepts in Sports Studies. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-5.
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  6.  10
    Moira Howes (forthcoming). Challenging Fitness Ideology: Why an Adventurous Approach to Physical Activity is Better for Well-Being. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-16.
    In this paper, I argue that adventurous approaches to physical activity can contribute more to well-being than approaches that have been shaped by fitness ideology. To defend this claim, I draw on work in philosophy and psychology concerning internal goods and intrinsic motivation, respectively. This work shows that motivating ourselves intrinsically and cultivating the internal goods of physical activity can contribute significantly to well-being. Unfortunately, the discourse and images associated with fitness culture tend to undermine intrinsic motivation and the cultivation (...)
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  7.  10
    Christopher Johnson & Jason Taylor (forthcoming). Rejecting Technology: A Normative Defense of Fallible Officiating. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-13.
    There is a growing consensus in both academic and popular reflections on sport that if the accuracy of officiating can be improved by technology, then such assistance ought to be introduced. Indeed, apart from certain practical concerns about technologizing officiating there are few normative objections, and those that are voiced are often poorly articulated and quickly dismissed by critics. In this paper, we take up one of these objections – what is referred to as the loss of the human element (...)
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  8.  3
    Jacob Kornbeck (forthcoming). Handbuch Datenschutz Im Sport: Formulare – Erläuterungen – Gesetze. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-6.
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  9.  3
    Christopher Martin & Oren Ergas (forthcoming). Mindfulness, Sport and the Body: The Justification of Physical Education Revisited. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-14.
    This paper offers a preliminary account of the educative potential of mindfulness by revisiting the long-debated status of physical activity and sport as educationally worthwhile. We argue that previous attempts in the tradition of analytic philosophy of education to offer a justification of physical activity and sport have not been sufficiently grounded in the most distinctive feature of those activities—the body. As an alternative, we claim that the theory and practice of body-based mindfulness can explain how physical activity can satisfy (...)
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  10.  9
    Gregg Twietmeyer (forthcoming). Catholic Perspectives: Youth Sport and Spirituality. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-4.
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  11.  4
    Steven N. Waller (forthcoming). Sport and the Christian Religion: A Systematic Review of Literature. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-4.
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