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Forthcoming articles
  1. Emily Ryall (forthcoming). Good Games and Penalty Shoot-Outs. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-9.
    This paper considers the concept of a good game in terms of its relation to the fair testing of relevant skills and their aesthetic values. As such, it will consider what makes football ‘the beautiful game’ and what part penalty shoot-outs play, or should play, within it. It begins by outlining and refuting Kretchmar’s proposal that games which end following the elapsing of a set amount of time , such as football, are structurally, morally and aesthetically inferior to games which (...)
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  2. Kenneth Aggerholm (forthcoming). Get the Last Laugh: On the Humourist as a Developmental Ideal in Invasion Games. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy.
     
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  3. Wivi Andersen & Sigmund Loland (forthcoming). Sport and the Obligation of Solidarity. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-14.
    The paper departs from an analysis of the case of Michelle Dumaresq, a transgender female downhill mountain biker who experienced marginalization within her sport. The analysis is based on Axel Honneth’s theory of recognition. The Dumaresq case is particularly relevant to Honneth’s ideas of solidarity, which provide insight into the dynamics of social integration. Honneth’s theory of recognition also provides a conceptual framework and a methodology that gives new perspectives on the ethical significance of sport. In the paper, an analysis (...)
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  4. Steffen Borge (forthcoming). An Agon Aesthetics of Football. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-27.
    In this article, I first address the ethical considerations about football and show that a meritocratic-fairness view of sports fails to capture the phenomenon of football. Fairness of result is not at centre stage in football. Football is about the drama, about the tension and the emotions it provokes. This moves us to the realm of aesthetics. I reject the idea of the aesthetics of football as the disinterested aesthetic appreciation, which traditionally has been deemed central to aesthetics. Instead, I (...)
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  5. Steffen Borge, Murray Smith & Margrethe Bruun Vaage (forthcoming). The Aesthetics of Football. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-4.
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  6. Leon Culbertson (forthcoming). Perception, Aspects and Explanation: Some Remarks on Moderate Partisanship. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-23.
    Modifying a contrast introduced by Dixon, Stephen Mumford distinguishes between ‘partisan’ and ‘purist’ ways of watching sport. Recognising that the extreme partisan and extreme purist positions do not explain the nature of sports spectatorship, Mumford follows Dixon in adopting the idea of moderate partisanship. He outlines three theories of spectatorship designed to address the issue of the relationship between the partisan and the purist ways of viewing sport. The true perception theory regards the moderate fan as able to see the (...)
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  7. Paul Davis (forthcoming). Football is Football and is Interesting, Very Interesting. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-13.
    There are robust consequences of the fact that football is football and not something else. The aesthetic personality of football does not submit to a template inappropriately borrowed from elsewhere. One consequence is that beauty should not be awarded privileged status. Any just aesthetics of the game must be properly hospitable to the game’s less hygienic and agonistic features, such as stolid defence, scuffling and scavenging, heroic goalkeeping, visible toil and strain, the intrinsic possibility of failure, the visibly strenuous working (...)
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  8. Andrew Edgar (forthcoming). Football and the Poetics of Space. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-13.
    This paper explores space as a core source of aesthetic pleasure in various codes of football. The paper begins by applying Kant’s distinction between the agreeable and the pleasurable to sport, arguing that the appreciation of sport entails more than just excitement. Pleasure comes from an appreciation of the rules, strategies and history of the game. The significance of the rules of various codes of football in articulating our experience of space will be taken as fundamental to such appreciation. Drawing (...)
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  9. Douglas Hochstetler (forthcoming). Review of True Competition: A Guide to Pursuing Excellence in Sport and Society. [REVIEW] Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-3.
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  10. Peter M. Hopsicker (forthcoming). Theology, Ethics, and Transcendence in Sports. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-5.
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  11. Ivo Jirásek & Geoffery Zain Kohe (forthcoming). Readjusting Our Sporting Sites/Sight: Sportification and the Theatricality of Social Life. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-14.
    This paper points out the potential of using sport for the analysis of society. Cultivated human movement is a specific social and cultural subsystem, yet it becomes a part of wider social discourses by extending some of its characteristics into various other spheres. This process, theorised as sportification, provides as useful concept to examine the permeation of certain phenomena from the area of sport into the social reality outside of sport. In this paper, we investigate the phenomena of sportification which (...)
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  12. Lev Kreft (forthcoming). Aesthetic Imagination in Football. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-16.
    In my previous texts on aesthetics of sport and of football, the accent was on dramatic aesthetic properties and on everyday aesthetics as a proper framework for the aesthetics of sport in general and football in particular. Here, following this starting point, the character of football as a game of social interactions and its character of purposive sport are examined, to find out what could be the most important aesthetic condition for playing the game and being-in-the-game. To get at the (...)
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  13. Iain Lindsey (forthcoming). Nico Schulenkorf, and Daryl Adair , Global Sport-for-Development: Critical Perspectives. Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, Pp280, £65, ISBN 9781137289629. [REVIEW] Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-3.
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  14. Irena Martínková & Jim Parry (forthcoming). On Biting in Sport—The Case of Luis Suárez. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-19.
    So the Uruguayan footballer Luis Suárez has confessed, apologised and given assurances as to future good behaviour, after his 2014 World Cup assault on the Italian defender Chiellini. There were three immediate excuses and mitigations offered, which we dismiss: that it was inconsequential; that it was no different from many other ‘assaults’; and that it was not particularly serious. Our central question has a different focus: what makes biting in sport such a bad thing, especially since it does not seem (...)
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  15. Graham McFee (forthcoming). A Not-So-Beautiful Game. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-16.
    Although football is often referred to as ‘the beautiful game’, to take that idea very seriously — by aestheticizing the target of spectating — is to misunderstand a purposive sport such as football. Yet such a view seems required by Stephen Mumford’s endorsement of the purist spectator, in contrast to the partisan, as attending to ‘… only aesthetic aspects of sport’. But, first, not all non-purposive appreciation is thereby aesthetic appreciation, as Mumford assumes. And, second, while a technical understanding of (...)
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  16. Brad Partridge (forthcoming). Rethinking Drug Use in Sport: Why the War Will Never Be Won. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-3.
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  17. Emily Ryall (forthcoming). Sport and Film. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-4.
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