Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1.  60
    Alfred Archer (forthcoming). On Sporting Integrity. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-15.
    It has become increasingly popular for sports <span class='Hi'>fans</span>, pundits, coaches and players to appeal to ideas of ‘sporting integrity’ when voicing their approval or disapproval of some aspect of the sporting world. My goal in this paper will be to examine whether there is any way to understand this idea in a way that both makes sense of the way in which it is used and presents a distinctly ‘sporting’ form of integrity. I will look at three (...)
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  2. Kenneth Aggerholm (forthcoming). Get the Last Laugh: On the Humourist as a Developmental Ideal in Invasion Games. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy.
     
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  3.  1
    Michael Bar-Eli, Yuval Eylon & Amir Horowitz (forthcoming). A Psycho-Philosophical Analysis of Fouls and Intentions in Contact Sports. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-14.
    This paper examines the notion of fouls in sports. In the first part of the paper, we examine some actual distinctions and classifications between different kinds of fouls. In the second part we examine the significance, validity, and justification of these classifications from a normative perspective.The term ‘foul’ evokes negative connotation; some would say—negative normative connotations. Conventional wisdom suggests that typically to commit fouls is, by definition, to go against the rules or principles of the contest. Since sport contests are (...)
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  4.  5
    Steffen Borge (forthcoming). Sport Records Are Social Facts. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-12.
    In this paper I address the topic of sport records and concentrate on the ontology of sport records. I argue that sport records are social facts in the sense that sport records not only depend on the physical facts of sport competitions, but also on the attitude we take towards the phenomenon—our attitude is partly constitutive of the phenomenon of sport records. In particular, the Mieto–Wassberg incident and the Larsson–McKee incident show that performance records should also be regarded as social (...)
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  5. Christina Conroy (forthcoming). The Phenomenology of Dance. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-4.
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  6. Steven Conway (forthcoming). An Earthless World: The Contemporary Enframing of Sport in Digital Games. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-14.
    This article provides a phenomenological understanding of contemporary sport and its digital game incarnation. The latter is highlighted as, currently, an example par excellence of what Martin Heidegger referred to as Enframing : the essence of modern technology that discloses being only in its availability for consumption. This concept is clarified and compared with a phenomenological comprehension of art and play. Building upon these notions, the physical sport and its digital emulation are compared and contrasted, illustrating how key criteria for (...)
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  7. Leon Culbertson (forthcoming). Scylla and Charybdis: The Purist’s Dilemma. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-22.
    This paper explores the view that, on Mumford’s account of the purist, to the degree that the purist adopts an aesthetic perspective, he or she doesn’t watch the sport in question, and to the degree that he or she does watch the sport, there is a loss of aesthetic appreciation. The idea that spectators oscillate between partisanship and purism means that the purist is unable to avoid either the Scylla of not actually watching the sport, or the Charybdis of loss (...)
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  8.  1
    Andrew Edgar (forthcoming). Personal Identity and the Massively Multiplayer Online World. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-16.
    This paper explores the implications that the construction and use of avatars in games such as Second Life and World of Warcraft have for our understanding of personal identity. It asks whether the avatar can meaningfully be experienced as a separate person, existing in parallel to the flesh and blood player. A rehearsal of Cartesian and Lockean accounts of personal identity constructs an understanding of the self that is challenged by the experience of online play. It will be argued that (...)
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  9.  1
    Lisa Edwards, Paul Davis & Alison Forbes (forthcoming). Challenging Sex Segregation: A Philosophical Evaluation of the Football Association’s Rules on Mixed Football. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-12.
    The Football Association has been under pressure to allow girls to play in mixed teams since 1978, following 12-year old Theresa Bennett’s application to play with boys in a local league. In 1991, over a decade after Bennett’s legal challenge, the FA agreed to remove its ban on mixed football and introduced Rule C4 in order to permit males and females to play together in competitive matches under the age of 11. More recently, following a campaign by parents, coaches, local (...)
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  10.  7
    Colleen English (forthcoming). Philosophy of Sport: Critical Concepts in Sports Studies. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-5.
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  11.  1
    Francisco Javier Lopez Frias (forthcoming). The Defining Components of the Cyborg: Cyborg-Athletes, Fictional or Real? Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-15.
    In this paper, I engage in the debate on the definition of the cyborg. I identify the two defining components of the traditional definition of the cyborg: the symbiotic relationship between human nature and technology; and the embodiment of a superhuman or inhuman feature or ability. Then, I trace these two components in the scholarly debate on the cyborg. To conclude, I explore the role the scholarly view of the cyborg plays in the debate on cyborg-athletes in the philosophy of (...)
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  12.  1
    Francisco Javier Lopez Frias & José Luis Pérez Triviño (forthcoming). Will Robots Ever Play Sports? Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-16.
    This paper addresses the possibility of robots engaging in sports. Recently, several movies like Ex-Machina, Chappi, and Transcendence challenge the spectator to think of the consequences of creating artificial intelligences. Although we refer to athletes who have outstanding sporting performances as machines, for example, in cycling people say ‘the cyclist looked like a machine with wheels,’ the potential participation of such AI in sport has not been addressed. For our argument’s sake, we will assume that the creation of human-like robots (...)
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  13.  2
    Francisco Lopez Frias (forthcoming). Talent Development, Existential Philosophy, and Sport. On Becoming an Elite Athlete. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-5.
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  14.  3
    Jan Halák (forthcoming). Towards the World: Eugen Fink on the Cosmological Value of Play. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-12.
    According to Eugen Fink, a thorough elucidation of the meaning of play has the capacity to lead us towards an understanding of the world as a totality. In order to go beyond Plato’s understanding of play as an inferior copy of serious action, Fink provides an analysis of the cultic game. This form of playing cannot be said to be the origin of all play, but it enables us to demonstrate how the act of playing transcends circumscribed beings inside the (...)
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  15.  2
    Ivo V. Hilvoorde & Niek Pot (forthcoming). Embodiment and Fundamental Motor Skills in eSports. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-14.
    Electronic sports and other variants of ‘digital sports’ have increased in popularity all over the world and may even come to challenge hegemonic concepts of sport. More relevant than the apparent opposition between ‘physical’ and ‘non-physical’ is the question what kind of embodiment is manifested within virtual environments. In this paper, we argue that eSports do require the learning and performance of motor skills and that embodiment within a virtual environment may be considered playful or even athletic. The type of (...)
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  16. Douglas Hochstetler (forthcoming). Running with the Pack. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-3.
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  17. Jason Holt (forthcoming). Virtual Domains for Sports and Games. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-9.
    Videogames present deep challenges for traditional concepts of sport and games. Cybersport in particular suggests that sport might be transposed into digital arenas, and videogames in general provide apparently striking counterexamples to the orthodox Suitsian theory of games, seeming to lack strictly prelusory goals and perhaps even also constitutive rules. I argue as follows: if any cybersports count as genuine sports, it will be those most closely resembling uncontroversial core instances of sport, those that essentially involve gross motor skill. Even (...)
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  18.  7
    Moira Howes (forthcoming). Challenging Fitness Ideology: Why an Adventurous Approach to Physical Activity is Better for Well-Being. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-16.
    In this paper, I argue that adventurous approaches to physical activity can contribute more to well-being than approaches that have been shaped by fitness ideology. To defend this claim, I draw on work in philosophy and psychology concerning internal goods and intrinsic motivation, respectively. This work shows that motivating ourselves intrinsically and cultivating the internal goods of physical activity can contribute significantly to well-being. Unfortunately, the discourse and images associated with fitness culture tend to undermine intrinsic motivation and the cultivation (...)
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  19.  6
    Christopher Johnson & Jason Taylor (forthcoming). Rejecting Technology: A Normative Defense of Fallible Officiating. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-13.
    There is a growing consensus in both academic and popular reflections on sport that if the accuracy of officiating can be improved by technology, then such assistance ought to be introduced. Indeed, apart from certain practical concerns about technologizing officiating there are few normative objections, and those that are voiced are often poorly articulated and quickly dismissed by critics. In this paper, we take up one of these objections – what is referred to as the loss of the human element (...)
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  20.  1
    Kalle Jonasson (forthcoming). Broadband and Circuits: The Place of Public Gaming in the History of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-14.
    This essay concerns the place of e-sport in the history of sport. E-sport is construed as an entity in this corpus, by seeking out historical counterparts that display similar forms of play and organisation. Thus, ancient Roman games are identified as an early instance of what could be called public gaming, i.e. competitive digital games in a public setting. Two recent philosophical statements regarding the history of sport furnish the point of departure of the analysis: Steven Connor's historicising of the (...)
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  21.  1
    Jacob Kornbeck (forthcoming). Handbuch Datenschutz Im Sport: Formulare – Erläuterungen – Gesetze. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-6.
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  22. Christopher Martin & Oren Ergas (forthcoming). Mindfulness, Sport and the Body: The Justification of Physical Education Revisited. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-14.
    This paper offers a preliminary account of the educative potential of mindfulness by revisiting the long-debated status of physical activity and sport as educationally worthwhile. We argue that previous attempts in the tradition of analytic philosophy of education to offer a justification of physical activity and sport have not been sufficiently grounded in the most distinctive feature of those activities—the body. As an alternative, we claim that the theory and practice of body-based mindfulness can explain how physical activity can satisfy (...)
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  23.  1
    S. P. Morris (forthcoming). Moral Luck and the Talent Problem. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-12.
    My objective in this project is to explore the concept of moral luck as it relates to sports. I am especially interested in constitutive luck. As a foundation I draw from both Bernard Williams and Thomas Nagel’s classic handling of moral luck, generally. Within the philosophy of sport are similar explorations of this nexus by Robert Simon and David Carr that also factor into the present work. My intent is to put a new lens in front of a puzzle drawn (...)
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  24.  4
    Brad Partridge (forthcoming). Rethinking Drug Use in Sport: Why the War Will Never Be Won. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-3.
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  25.  1
    Barış Şentuna & Dinçer Kanbur (forthcoming). What Kind of an Activity is a Virtual Game? A Postmodern Approach in Relation to Concept of Phantasm by Deleuze and the Philosophy of Huizinga. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-9.
    ABSTRACTVirtual games are played by millions of people today. Almost everyone has the means to access virtual worlds in most places in the world. Virtual games are new worlds for the players waiting to be discovered. Video games in this new world are considered to be sports activities by some people, while some oppose to this conception. In this regard, philosophical approaches set out and the current state of whether video games are considered as sports activities is presented. In addition (...)
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  26.  6
    Gregg Twietmeyer (forthcoming). Catholic Perspectives: Youth Sport and Spirituality. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-4.
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  27.  1
    Steven N. Waller (forthcoming). Sport and the Christian Religion: A Systematic Review of Literature. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-4.
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