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Forthcoming articles
  1. Francisco Javier Lópex Frías (forthcoming). Doping and Anti-Doping Policy in Sport: Ethical, Legal, and Social Perspectives. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-5.
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  2. Emily Ryall (forthcoming). Good Games and Penalty Shoot-Outs. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-9.
    This paper considers the concept of a good game in terms of its relation to the fair testing of relevant skills and their aesthetic values. As such, it will consider what makes football ‘the beautiful game’ and what part penalty shoot-outs play, or should play, within it. It begins by outlining and refuting Kretchmar’s proposal that games which end following the elapsing of a set amount of time , such as football, are structurally, morally and aesthetically inferior to games which (...)
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  3. Kenneth Aggerholm (forthcoming). Get the Last Laugh: On the Humourist as a Developmental Ideal in Invasion Games. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy.
     
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  4. Carlo Bellieni (forthcoming). Paralympics Should Be Integrated Into Main Olympic Games. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-8.
    Paralympic Games , involving people with disabilities , are a manifestation of excellence in sport. They show that athletics performed by PWD counts as genuine sport. They also support a wider meaning of the term ‘health,’ understood not just like a utopian state of perfection, but like the ability to realize oneself in the projects and activities of one’s own choosing. Notwithstanding these virtues, PG—in their current form—may paradoxycally reinforce social prejudice against PWD. This is due to the fact that (...)
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  5. Bogdan Ciomaga & Cody Kent (forthcoming). Rethinking the Consequences of Commercializing Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-14.
    In the sport ethics literature, the general attitude with regard to the influence of commercialization in sport is to draw attention to the ways it undermines sport and morally corrupts those involved in it. This paper attempts to provide a counternarrative to this literature, focusing on criticism of commodification of sport that revolves around the idea of fairness. A brief libertarian framework is presented and three characteristics of sport are outlined, which are shown to make sport a particularly well-suited context (...)
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  6. Paul Davis (forthcoming). Football is Football and is Interesting, Very Interesting. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-13.
    There are robust consequences of the fact that football is football and not something else. The aesthetic personality of football does not submit to a template inappropriately borrowed from elsewhere. One consequence is that beauty should not be awarded privileged status. Any just aesthetics of the game must be properly hospitable to the game’s less hygienic and agonistic features, such as stolid defence, scuffling and scavenging, heroic goalkeeping, visible toil and strain, the intrinsic possibility of failure, the visibly strenuous working (...)
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  7. Andrew Edgar (forthcoming). Football and the Poetics of Space. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-13.
    This paper explores space as a core source of aesthetic pleasure in various codes of football. The paper begins by applying Kant’s distinction between the agreeable and the pleasurable to sport, arguing that the appreciation of sport entails more than just excitement. Pleasure comes from an appreciation of the rules, strategies and history of the game. The significance of the rules of various codes of football in articulating our experience of space will be taken as fundamental to such appreciation. Drawing (...)
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  8. Douglas Hochstetler (forthcoming). Review of True Competition: A Guide to Pursuing Excellence in Sport and Society. [REVIEW] Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-3.
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  9. Peter M. Hopsicker (forthcoming). Theology, Ethics, and Transcendence in Sports. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-5.
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  10. Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza (forthcoming). Section III: Holistic Bridges: The Mind Sciences, Phenomenology, and Our Skills. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-1.
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  11. Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza (forthcoming). Section IV. East and West Teamwork: A Comparative Analysis of Skillful Performance. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-1.
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  12. Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza (forthcoming). 6—Waking Up From The Cognitivist Dream—The Computational View of the Mind and High Performance. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-30.
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  13. Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza (forthcoming). 7—Riding The Wind—Consummate Performance, Phenomenology, and Skillful Fluency. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-46.
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  14. Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza (forthcoming). 8—Fractured Action—Choking in Sport and its Lessons for Excellence. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-34.
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  15. Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza (forthcoming). Epilogue. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-6.
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  16. Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza (forthcoming). Appendix—Much Ado About Nothing. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-12.
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  17. Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza (forthcoming). 10—Everything Mysterious Under the Moon—Social Practices and Situated Holism. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-64.
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  18. Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza (forthcoming). 9—Reflections on a Katana – The Japanese Pursuit of Performative Mastery. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-48.
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  19. R. Scott Kretchmar (forthcoming). A Games” and Their Relationship to T and E Games. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-11.
    In this essay, I revisit my claims about game structures and amend them by adding achievement-regulated games to previously analyzed time- and event-structured activities. In describing achievement formats, I discuss their heavy reliance on the world of work, their strong dependency on Suits’ lusory attitude, and their relative independence from constitutive rules. I argue that achievement-structured games carry disadvantages not shared by time- and event-regulated activities. I speculate that achievement gaming came first in our evolutionary history, but show that it (...)
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  20. Iain Lindsey (forthcoming). Nico Schulenkorf, and Daryl Adair , Global Sport-for-Development: Critical Perspectives. Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, Pp280, £65, ISBN 9781137289629. [REVIEW] Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-3.
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  21. Irena Martínková & Jim Parry (forthcoming). On Biting in Sport—The Case of Luis Suárez. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-19.
    So the Uruguayan footballer Luis Suárez has confessed, apologised and given assurances as to future good behaviour, after his 2014 World Cup assault on the Italian defender Chiellini. There were three immediate excuses and mitigations offered, which we dismiss: that it was inconsequential; that it was no different from many other ‘assaults’; and that it was not particularly serious. Our central question has a different focus: what makes biting in sport such a bad thing, especially since it does not seem (...)
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  22. Graham McFee (forthcoming). A Not-So-Beautiful Game. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-16.
    Although football is often referred to as ‘the beautiful game’, to take that idea very seriously — by aestheticizing the target of spectating — is to misunderstand a purposive sport such as football. Yet such a view seems required by Stephen Mumford’s endorsement of the purist spectator, in contrast to the partisan, as attending to ‘… only aesthetic aspects of sport’ . But, first, not all non-purposive appreciation is thereby aesthetic appreciation, as Mumford assumes. And, second, while a technical understanding (...)
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  23. Albert Piacente (forthcoming). Reverse Play: Toward A Philosophy From Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-17.
    In this paper, I argue that, beyond a philosophy of sport, space should be made for a ‘philosophy from sport.’ A philosophy from sport is one that can allow us to see sport as more than instantiating broader social values or possessing an isolated set of unique values . It can, as I believe a philosophy from sport, by paying special attention to the actual practice of sport, bring with it ways of developing, informing, even justifying a set of broader (...)
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  24. Heather L. Reid (forthcoming). The Bloomsbury Companion to the Philosophy of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-4.
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  25. Steven Skultety (forthcoming). Revisiting Competitive Categories: A Reply to Royce. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-12.
    In this article, I respond to the criticisms that Richard Royce has made of my theory of competition in Sport, Ethics and Philosophy. While I find some of his attacks misplaced, a number of his criticisms address key difficulties to which I offer clarification and defense.
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  26. Abe Zakhem (forthcoming). The Virtues of a Good Fight: Assessing the Ethics of Fighting in the National Hockey League. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-15.
    Violence in sports is under intense public scrutiny. One hotly disputed issue concerns the acceptability of violent retaliation in sports, particular in the form of fighting in the National Hockey League . The question posed here is: Can fighting in the NHL be virtuous? Some think not, maintaining that fighting is undisciplined and ostensibly at odds with the virtues of good temper and justice. Contrary to this conclusion, this paper presents arguments that support the view that fighting in the NHL (...)
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