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  1. Valentin Bazhanov (2015). Epistemological Contributions to the Study of Science in the Latter Days of the USSR: Rethinking Orthodox Marxist Principles. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):111-121.
    During the last quarter of the twentieth century, Soviet Russian philosophy did away with ideology in the fields of Science; but until the mid-1980s, scientists could not escape intense ideological scrutiny. A great number of Soviet scientists did their best to avoid this ideological supervision, and pursued their research, remaining neutral toward Marxist ideology. Among these fields of research were so called “philosophical problems of natural sciences” . Some Soviet Russian philosophers put forward original conceptions of scientific development, the structural (...)
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  2. Tamás Demeter (2015). Three Genres of Sociology of Knowledge and Their Marxist Origins. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):1-11.
    In the present paper I sketch three genres of sociology of knowledge and trace their roots to Marx and Marxist literature while reconstructing two causal and one hermeneutic strand in this context. While so doing the main focus is set on György Lukács and György Márkus and their interpretation of Marx’s contribution to sociologically minded theories of knowledge. As a conclusion I point out that Marx-inspired sociologies of knowledge are more sensitive to the relation of larger-scale social and historical processes (...)
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  3. Val Dusek (2015). Lakatos Between Marxism and the Hungarian Heuristic Tradition. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):61-73.
    Imre Lakatos gained fame in the English-speaking world as a follower and critic of philosopher of science Karl Popper. However, Lakatos’ background involved other philosophical and scientific sources from his native Hungary. Lakatos surreptitiously used Hegelian Marxism in his works on philosophy of science and mathematics, disguising it with the rhetoric of the Popper school. He also less surreptitiously incorporated, particularly in his treatment of mathematics, work of the strong tradition of heuristics in twentieth century Hungary. Both his Marxism and (...)
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  4. Nils Roll-Hansen (2015). On the Philosophical Roots of Today’s Science Policy: Any Lessons From the “Lysenko Affair”? Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):91-109.
    Present science policy discourse is focused on a broad concept of “techno-science” and emphasizes practical economic goals and gains. At the same time scientists are worried about the freedom of research and the autonomy of science. Half a century ago the difference between basic and applied science was widely taken for granted and autonomy was a value in high esteem. Most recent accounts of the history of science policy start abruptly from World War II, emphasize the Cold War context, and (...)
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  5. Constantine Skordoulis (2015). Bukharin and the Social Study of Science. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):75-89.
    This paper studies Bukharin’s Theory and Practice from the Standpoint of Dialectical Materialism presented at the 2nd International Congress of the History of Science in London, June 29–July 3, 1931. Bukharin’s paper has not received the attention it deserves despite the fact that it provides the theoretical framework for the paper mostly highlighted in this Congress, Boris Hessen’s The Social and Economic Roots of Newton’s Principia. In this work, I try to show that Bukharin’s main achievement is a theory of (...)
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  6. Gábor Szécsi (2015). Knowledge, Reality and Manipulation. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):31-39.
    The investigation of the social and epistemological context of the rejection of ontology makes György Lukács’s critique of neopositivism an important moment of his late work, Zur Ontologie des gesellschaftlichen Seins . This article argues, on the one hand, that Lukács’s critique of neopositivism can be regarded as an indispensable contribution to understand the social roots of realist attitudes towards ontology, and, on the other hand, that the target of Lukács’s marxist critique of neopositivism is indeed a special, neutral epistemological (...)
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  7. Monika Wulz (2015). Abstraction, Dissociation, and Mental Labor: Paul Szende’s Social Epistemology Between Physiology and Social Theory. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):13-30.
    In this paper I focus on the Hungarian intellectual and politician Paul Szende’s sociologically oriented epistemology. I trace the influences of physiology, psychology, economy, evolutionary theory of his day on his sociological theory of abstractive knowledge, and discuss the close connection between physiological, social, and economic aspects in the early sociology of knowledge. My discussion continues with an examination of Szende’s differentiation between two economic effects within social epistemology: on the one hand the ‘economy of thought’ in the tradition of (...)
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  8. Deodáth Zuh (2015). Arnold Hauser and the Multilayer Theory of Knowledge. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):41-59.
    The sociology of art as synthesized by Arnold Hauser is based on a theory of knowledge and articulates the cognitive role of art. In a brief analysis, this paper elaborates on the sources of this epistemological enterprise. The pedigree of Hauser’s main thoughts was oriented towards a Kantian and Marxist framework, respectively. As a Kantian, he tried to take into account the philosophical consequences of two different sources of cognition that are equal in value, correlative and necessarily cooperating. Giving exclusive (...)
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