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  1.  1
    Christiaan Beyers (2015). Will and Communality in Bakhtin, From a Nietzschean Perspective. Studies in East European Thought 67 (3-4):145-164.
    The article engages Bakhtin’s corpus with Nietzschean ideas in order to draw out critical resources for the social theory of ‘community’. It begins by considering both thinkers’ debt to neo-Kantianism, and proceeds to relate the ‘will to power’ to Bakhtin’s early intersubjective phenomenology of intentional acts. This interpretation is then extended to Bakhtin’s conception of art, where aesthetics stands in tensile relation to ethics in the exercise of authorial will. Bakhtin’s later work might be seen as elaborating more complex terms (...)
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  2. Craig Brandist (2015). Introduction: The ‘Bakhtin Circle’ in its Own Time and Ours. Studies in East European Thought 67 (3-4):123-128.
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  3.  1
    Craig Brandist (2015). The Eastern Side of the Circle: The Contribution of Mikhail Tubjanskij. Studies in East European Thought 67 (3-4):209-228.
    The intellectual biography of M. I. Tubjanskij is considered, setting his work within the context of the Bakhtin Circle in the mid-1920s, but considering his wider engagement with the intellectual field of the time. Tubjanskij’s passage from studies of the work of Hermann Cohen and of Plato, through his work on Buddhism, contemporary Bengali thought, especially the work of Rabindranath Tagore, to his later work on Mongolian culture is described and analysed. In conclusion it is argued that the non-European orientation (...)
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  4. Craig Brandist (2015). George Louis Kline. Studies in East European Thought 67 (3 - 4):265-265.
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  5. Caryl Emerson (2015). Bakhtin and the Actor. Studies in East European Thought 67 (3-4):183-207.
    The Bakhtin we know best is something of a lyricophobe and theatrophobe. This is surprising, since he loves the act of looking. His scenarios rely on visualized, collaborative communion. He cares deeply about embodiment. Does he care about the tasks that confront the actor? Not the improvising clown of carnival, but the trained artist who performs a play script on stage? In discussing these questions, this essay draws on two suggestive places in Bakhtin’s writing where he addresses the actor’s art. (...)
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  6. Ken Hirschkop (2015). Editing History: On the Publication of Bakhtin’s Sobranie Sočinenij, 1996–2012. Studies in East European Thought 67 (3-4):129-144.
    From the very beginning, it has been difficult to extract a smooth narrative from the complex plot of Bakhtin’s life and work. Early attempts to do this proposed an unconvincing distinction between a private philosophical Bakhtin and the man who wrote compelling and innovative work on the philosophy of language, the stylistics of the novel, and the culture of carnival. The 7-volume Sobranie sočinenij both frustrates and supports this simplifying narrative. The texts it presents, many radically different from earlier published (...)
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  7.  1
    Thomas Nemeth (2015). The Young Losev as Phenomenologist. Studies in East European Thought 67 (3-4):249-264.
    The two names most closely associated with phenomenology in early twentieth century Russia are Gustav Špet and Aleksej Losev. However, is that judgment warranted with regard to Losev? In just what way can we look on him as a phenomenologist? Losev himself, in the mid-1920s, employed the expression “dialectical phenomenology,” seeing phenomenology as an initial descriptive method to ascertain essences. He was sharply critical of its self-limitation in disavowing all explanation as metaphysical. Yet, earlier that decade Losev approved of Husserl’s (...)
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  8.  64
    Sergeiy Sandler (2015). A Strange Kind of Kantian: Bakhtin’s Reinterpretation of Kant and the Marburg School. Studies in East European Thought 67 (3/4):165-182.
    This paper looks at the ways in which Mikhail Bakhtin had appropriated the ideas of Kant and of the Marburg neo-Kantian school. While Bakhtin was greatly indebted to Kantian philosophy, and is known to have referred to himself as a neo-Kantian, he rejects the main tenets of neo-Kantianism. Instead, Bakhtin offers a substantial re-interpretation of Kantian thought. His frequent borrowings from neo-Kantian philosophers (Hermann Cohen, Paul Natorp, and others) also follow a distinctive pattern of appropriation, whereby blocks of interconnected ideas (...)
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  9.  3
    Richard Westerman (2015). The Irrational Act: Traces of Kierkegaard in Lukács’s Revolutionary Subject. Studies in East European Thought 67 (3-4):229-247.
    The Hungarian theorist Georg Lukács is known for his reintroduction of Hegelian thought to Marxist philosophy—but I argue that his account of the subjectivity of the proletariat owes just as much to the Danish philosopher and theologian Søren Kierkegaard. Despite strong differences in their outlook, their accounts of subjectivity have strong structural similarities. For both, a division of the self against itself produces suffering that leads in turn to a growing consciousness of the roots of the problem; in the end, (...)
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  10.  1
    Tamas Demeter (2015). Three Genres of Sociology of Knowledge and Their Marxist Origins. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):1-11.
    In the present paper I sketch three genres of sociology of knowledge and trace their roots to Marx and Marxist literature while reconstructing two causal and one hermeneutic strand in this context. While so doing the main focus is set on György Lukács and György Márkus and their interpretation of Marx’s contribution to sociologically minded theories of knowledge. As a conclusion I point out that Marx-inspired sociologies of knowledge are more sensitive to the relation of larger-scale social and historical processes (...)
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  11. Tamas Demeter (2015). Abstraction, Dissociation, and Mental Labor: Paul Szende’s Social Epistemology Between Physiology and Social Theory. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):13-30.
    In this paper I focus on the Hungarian intellectual and politician Paul Szende’s sociologically oriented epistemology. I trace the influences of physiology, psychology, economy, evolutionary theory of his day on his sociological theory of abstractive knowledge, and discuss the close connection between physiological, social, and economic aspects in the early sociology of knowledge. My discussion continues with an examination of Szende’s differentiation between two economic effects within social epistemology: on the one hand the ‘economy of thought’ in the tradition of (...)
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  12.  3
    Tamas Demeter (2015). On the Philosophical Roots of Today’s Science Policy: Any Lessons From the “Lysenko Affair”? Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):91-109.
    Present science policy discourse is focused on a broad concept of “techno-science” and emphasizes practical economic goals and gains. At the same time scientists are worried about the freedom of research and the autonomy of science. Half a century ago the difference between basic and applied science was widely taken for granted and autonomy was a value in high esteem. Most recent accounts of the history of science policy start abruptly from World War II, emphasize the Cold War context, and (...)
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  13.  1
    Tamas Demeter (2015). Lakatos Between Marxism and the Hungarian Heuristic Tradition. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):61-73.
    Imre Lakatos gained fame in the English-speaking world as a follower and critic of philosopher of science Karl Popper. However, Lakatos’ background involved other philosophical and scientific sources from his native Hungary. Lakatos surreptitiously used Hegelian Marxism in his works on philosophy of science and mathematics, disguising it with the rhetoric of the Popper school. He also less surreptitiously incorporated, particularly in his treatment of mathematics, work of the strong tradition of heuristics in twentieth century Hungary. Both his Marxism and (...)
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  14.  2
    Tamas Demeter (2015). Epistemological Contributions to the Study of Science in the Latter Days of the USSR: Rethinking Orthodox Marxist Principles. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):111-121.
    During the last quarter of the twentieth century, Soviet Russian philosophy did away with ideology in the fields of Science; but until the mid-1980s, scientists could not escape intense ideological scrutiny. A great number of Soviet scientists did their best to avoid this ideological supervision, and pursued their research, remaining neutral toward Marxist ideology. Among these fields of research were so called “philosophical problems of natural sciences”. Some Soviet Russian philosophers put forward original conceptions of scientific development, the structural features (...)
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  15.  2
    Tamas Demeter (2015). Arnold Hauser and the Multilayer Theory of Knowledge. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):41-59.
    The sociology of art as synthesized by Arnold Hauser is based on a theory of knowledge and articulates the cognitive role of art. In a brief analysis, this paper elaborates on the sources of this epistemological enterprise. The pedigree of Hauser’s main thoughts was oriented towards a Kantian and Marxist framework, respectively. As a Kantian, he tried to take into account the philosophical consequences of two different sources of cognition that are equal in value, correlative and necessarily cooperating. Giving exclusive (...)
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  16.  2
    Constantine D. Skordoulis (2015). Bukharin and the Social Study of Science. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1-2):75-89.
    This paper studies Bukharin’s Theory and Practice from the Standpoint of Dialectical Materialism presented at the 2nd International Congress of the History of Science in London, June 29–July 3, 1931. Bukharin’s paper has not received the attention it deserves despite the fact that it provides the theoretical framework for the paper mostly highlighted in this Congress, Boris Hessen’s The Social and Economic Roots of Newton’s Principia. In this work, I try to show that Bukharin’s main achievement is a theory of (...)
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  17.  2
    Gábor Szécsi (2015). Knowledge, Reality and Manipulation. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1-2):31-39.
    The investigation of the social and epistemological context of the rejection of ontology makes György Lukács’s critique of neopositivism an important moment of his late work, Zur Ontologie des gesellschaftlichen Seins . This article argues, on the one hand, that Lukács’s critique of neopositivism can be regarded as an indispensable contribution to understand the social roots of realist attitudes towards ontology, and, on the other hand, that the target of Lukács’s marxist critique of neopositivism is indeed a special, neutral epistemological (...)
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