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  1. David Bakhurst (2013). Il'enkov's Hegel. Studies in East European Thought 65 (3-4):271-285.
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  2. Siarhei Biareishyk (2013). Five-Year Plan of Philosophy: Stalinism After Kojève, Hegel After Stalinism. Studies in East European Thought 65 (3-4):243-258.
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  3. Victoria Frede (2013). Stankevič and Hegel's Arrival in Russia. Studies in East European Thought 65 (3-4):159-174.
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  4. Ilya Kliger (2013). Hegel's Political Philosophy and the Social Imaginary of Early Russian Realism. Studies in East European Thought 65 (3-4):189-199.
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  5. Ilya Kliger & David Bakhurst (2013). Preface: Hegel in Russia. Studies in East European Thought 65 (3-4):155-157.
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  6. Jeff Love (2013). Hegelian Madness? Nikolaj Fëdorov's Repudiation of History. Studies in East European Thought 65 (3-4):201-212.
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  7. Inessa Medzhibovskaya (2013). Goethe and Hegel in the Commissariat of Enlightenment: Anatoly Lunačarskij's Program of Bolshevik–Marxist Aesthetics. Studies in East European Thought 65 (3-4):227-241.
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  8. Nikolaj Plotnikov (2013). Hegel at the GAKhN: Between Idealism and Marxism—on the Aesthetic Debates in Russia in the 1920s. Studies in East European Thought 65 (3-4):213-225.
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  9. Vadim Shkolnikov (2013). The Philosophical Cap of Yegor Fjodorovič or Becoming Belinskij. Studies in East European Thought 65 (3-4):175-187.
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  10. Vadim Shneyder (2013). On the Hegelian Roots of Lukács's Theory of Realism. Studies in East European Thought 65 (3-4):259-269.
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  11. Anna Brożek (2013). Bocheński on Authority. Studies in East European Thought 65 (1-2):115-133.
    Józef Maria Bocheński introduced an important distinction between deontic and epistemic authority. A typical example of epistemic authority is the relation of a teacher to his students; a typical example of deontic authority is the relation between an employer and his employee. The difference between the two lies in domains of authority: declarative sentences make up the domain in the case of epistemic authority, orders—in the domain of deontic authority. In the article, I analyze in detail the concepts of the (...)
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  12. Mariusz Grygianiec (2013). Two Approaches to the Problem of Universals by J. M. Bocheński. Studies in East European Thought 65 (1-2):27-42.
    The main aim of the paper is to reconstruct and analyse two methodological approaches to the problem of universals, presented in Bocheński’s papers “Powszechniki jako treści cech w filozofii św. Tomasza z Akwinu” and “The Problem of Universals.” It is argued that, although these approaches are rather different from historical and methodological points of view, they are still based on the same ontological ground, viz. on immanent realism. The article provides a detailed analysis and comparison of the respective views. Justification (...)
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  13. Piotr Kostyło (2013). Józef Bocheński and Static Religion. Studies in East European Thought 65 (1-2):101-113.
    One of the most interesting aspects of Józef Bocheński’s philosophy was its relation to Henri Bergson’s thought, particularly to his philosophy of religion. Unlike the majority of the Catholic philosophers at that time, Bocheński did not stress the significance of dynamic religion, but rather focused on the role of static religion in human life. In his view, what was of particular interest within this religion was its fabulation function. This direction of the philosopher’s research stemmed from the realism and empiricism (...)
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  14. Marek Lechniak (2013). J.M. Bocheński's Method of Philosophical Analysis and Contemporary Applied Ontology. Studies in East European Thought 65 (1-2):17-26.
    The aim of this article is to reconstruct Bocheński’s method of philosophical analysis as well as to clarify the purpose of that method and its basic elements. In the second part of the paper I will compare Bocheński’s method with the methods of modern applied ontology.
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  15. Edward Nieznański (2013). The First Formalized Proof of the Indestructibility of a Subsistent Form. Studies in East European Thought 65 (1-2):65-73.
    The article presents a formalization of Thomas Aquinas proof for the indestructibility of the human soul. The author of the formalization—the first of its kind in the history of philosophy—is Father Joseph Maria Bocheński. The presentation involves no more than updating the logical symbolism used and accompanies the logical formulae with ordinary language paraphrases in order to ease the reader’s understanding of the formulae. “The fundamental idea of the Thomist proof is of utmost simplicity: things which are destructible are destructible (...)
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  16. Marek Porwolik (2013). Józef Maria Bocheński's Logical Analyses of Question I of St. Thomas Aquinas' Summa Theologiae. Studies in East European Thought 65 (1-2):75-99.
    Bocheński claims that it would be very useful to apply logical tools to philosophical and theological investigations. His viewpoint can be ascribed to the fact that during Bocheński’s youth logic and reflections on the foundations of mathematics flourished. His seminal work on these issues is the book Gottes Dasein und Wesen. Logische Studien zur Summa Theologiae I, qq. 2–11 (2003). Due to the fact that it was necessary to introduce numerous corrections to it, the book was published over a decade (...)
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  17. Roger Pouivet (2013). Bocheński on Divine Ineffability. Studies in East European Thought 65 (1-2):43-51.
    Section 11 of Józef Bocheński’s The Logic of religion (1965), is devoted to the question of divine ineffability: Is it possible to speak of God? Bocheński shows that even if the assertion of God’s ineffability is not contradictory, it can be contested. Bocheński seems to think ineffabilism is based primarily on a confusion, viz., on the claim that faith is dependent on an extraordinary experience, and it is this extraordinary experience which is supposed to be ineffable. The ineffabilist is unable (...)
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  18. Edward M. Świderski (2013). Bocheński on the Human Condition: Is a Long and Happy Life the Whole Story? [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 65 (1-2):135-153.
    Following his retirement from teaching in 1972 J. M. Bocheński entered into a creative phase of his scholarly career characterized by, among other things, a marked shift to ‘naturalism’ to the detriment of philosophical ‘speculation’ of any kind (comprising much of classical metaphysics, ‘world views’, ‘ideologies, ‘moralizing’—for him so many nefarious ‘superstitions’). During this period he examined issues which bear on the human condition in a way that was at once constructive and critical—constructive by virtue of the logical analyses of (...)
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  19. Jan Woleński (2013). Józef M. Bocheński and the Cracow Circle. Studies in East European Thought 65 (1-2):5-15.
    Józef M. Bocheński began his philosophical career as an eclectic philosopher, then switched to Thomism and finally became a representative of the analytic school. As a Thomist he wanted to reform this orientation by the resources of modern formal logic. This tendency culminated in the establishment of the Cracow Circle (established in 1936) whose members were Bocheński, Jan F. Drewnowski, Jan Salamucha, and Bolesław Sobociński. However, the program of the Cracow Circle was rejected by most Thomists who considered traditional logic (...)
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  20. Dariusz Łukasiewicz (2013). Bocheński on Divine Providence and Human Freedom. Studies in East European Thought 65 (1-2):53-63.
    Prior to his ‘naturalistic turn’, Bocheński was a Thomist and defended the Thomist doctrine as a logically consistent and attractive philosophical system. Some opponents of Thomism interpreted this doctrine, Aquinas’s conception of divine providence included, as a kind of theological fatalism (or theological determinism) incompatible with human freedom. Bocheński dismissed such interpretations as based on “a superficial misunderstanding.” I will try to demonstrate that his criticism of deterministic interpretations of Thomism was not quite justified. The article will present, first, Bocheński’s (...)
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  21. Dariusz Łukasiewicz & Ryszard Mordarski (2013). Introduction. Studies in East European Thought 65 (1-2):1-3.
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