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Forthcoming articles
  1.  10
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). Ancillary Care Obligations in Light of an African Bioethic: From Entrustment to Communion. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37.
    Henry Richardson has recently published the first book ever devoted to ancillary care obligations, which roughly concern what medical researchers are morally required to provide to participants beyond what safety requires. In it Richardson notes that he has presented the ‘only fully elaborated view out there’ on this topic, which he calls the ‘partial-entrustment model’. In this article, I provide a new theory of ancillary care obligations, one that is grounded on ideals of communion salient in the African philosophical tradition (...)
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  2. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Exemplarism, Ethics, and Illness Narratives. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics.
    Many people report that reading first-person narratives of the experience of illness can be morally instructive or educative. But although they are ubiquitous and typically sincere, the precise nature of such educative experiences is puzzling—for those narratives typically lack the features that modern philosophers regard as constitutive of moral reason. I argue that such puzzlement should disappear, and the morally educative power of illness narratives explained, if one distinguishes two different styles of moral reason: an inferentialist style that generates the (...)
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  3. James W. Nickel (forthcoming). Can a Right to Health Care Be Justified by Linkage Arguments? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-14.
    Linkage arguments, which defend a controversial right by showing that it is indispensable or highly useful to an uncontroversial right, are sometimes used to defend the right to health care. This article evaluates such arguments when used to defend RHC. Three common errors in using linkage arguments are neglecting levels of implementation, expanding the scope of the supported right beyond its uncontroversial domain, and giving too much credit to the supporting right for outcomes in its area. A familiar linkage argument (...)
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  4.  2
    David A. Reidy (forthcoming). A Right to Health Care? Participatory Politics, Progressive Policy, and the Price of Loose Language. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-20.
    This article begins by clarifying and noting various limitations on the universal reach of the human right to health care under positive international law. It then argues that irrespective of the human right to health care established by positive international law, any system of positive international law capable of generating legal duties with prima facie moral force necessarily presupposes a universal moral human right to health care. But the language used in contemporary human rights documents or human rights advocacy is (...)
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  5. Julian Reiss (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable 2009. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics.
     
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