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Forthcoming articles
  1. Hillel D. Braude (forthcoming). Eric J Cassell: The Nature of Clinical Medicine: The Return of the Clinician. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-3.
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  2. Luciana Caenazzo (forthcoming). Norbert Konrad, Birgit Völlm and, David N. Weisstub : Ethical Issues in Prison Psychiatry. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-2.
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  3. Patrick Daly (forthcoming). Palliative Sedation, Foregoing Life-Sustaining Treatment, and Aid-in-Dying: What is the Difference? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-17.
    After a review of terminology, I identify—in addition to Margaret Battin’s list of five primary arguments for and against aid-in-dying—the argument from functional equivalence as another primary argument. I introduce a novel way to approach this argument based on Bernard Lonergan’s generalized empirical method . Then I proceed on the basis of GEM to distinguish palliative sedation, palliative sedation to unconsciousness when prognosis is less than two weeks, and foregoing life-sustaining treatment from aid-in-dying. I conclude that aid-in-dying must be justified (...)
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  4. Élodie Giroux (forthcoming). Epidemiology and the Bio-Statistical Theory of Disease: A Challenging Perspective. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-21.
    Christopher Boorse’s bio-statistical theory of health and disease argues that the central discipline on which theoretical medicine relies is physiology. His theory has been much discussed but little has been said about its focus on physiology or, conversely, about the role that other biomedical disciplines may play in establishing a theoretical concept of health. Since at least the 1950s, epidemiology has gained in strength and legitimacy as an independent medical science that contributes to our knowledge of health and disease. Indeed, (...)
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  5. Mario Picozzi & Viviana Cislaghi (forthcoming). Keith Wailoo, Julie Livingston, Steven Epstein, Robert Aronowitz : Three Shots at Prevention: The HPV Vaccine and the Politics of Medicine’s Simple Solutions. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-6.
    In order to fully understand the ethical, cultural, and political debate that moves around the papillomavirus vaccine, a bit of attention has to be paid to its history.In 2006 the first advertisements for Gardasil, the commercial name of the vaccine, started to appear in the United States. Merck pharmaceutical was the main dealer. Their “One Less” campaign was characterized by adolescent girls staring into the camera and saying, “I’m one less,” declaring their intention to be vaccinated against the human papillomavirus, (...)
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  6. Julian Reiss (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable 2009. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics.
     
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  7. Lorenzo Simonato (forthcoming). Niklas Juth, Christian Munthe: The Ethics of Screening in Healthcare and Medicine: Serving Society or Serving the Patient? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-3.
    The hypothesis that administering a diagnostic test to an asymptomatic population can detect a relevant proportion of prevalent cases in an early phase and therefore improve the chances of curing disease dates back to the sixties and has been tested and applied mainly to neoplastic diseases. Meanwhile, the practice of screening has benefitted from the progress of diagnostic technology and from the development, particularly in Europe, of efficient national health systems.Half a century later, two Swedish researchers, Niklas Juth and Christian (...)
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  8. Nils-Frederic Wagner & Georg Northoff (forthcoming). A Fallacious Jar? The Peculiar Relation Between Descriptive Premises and Normative Conclusions in Neuroethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-21.
    Ethical questions have traditionally been approached through conceptual analysis. Inspired by the rapid advance of modern brain imaging techniques, however, some ethical questions appear in a new light. For example, hotly debated trolley dilemmas have recently been studied by psychologists and neuroscientists alike, arguing that their findings can support or debunk moral intuitions that underlie those dilemmas. Resulting from the wedding of philosophy and neuroscience, neuroethics has emerged as a novel interdisciplinary field that aims at drawing conclusive relationships between neuroscientific (...)
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