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Forthcoming articles
  1. Benjamin Smart (forthcoming). On the Classification of Diseases. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-19.
    Identifying the necessary and sufficient conditions for individuating and classifying diseases is a matter of great importance in the fields of law, ethics, epidemiology, and of course, medicine. In this paper, I first propose a means of achieving this goal, ensuring that no two distinct disease-types could correctly be ascribed to the same disease-token. I then posit a metaphysical ontology of diseases—that is, I give an account of what a disease is. This is essential to providing the most effective means (...)
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  2. Maria M. Boscolo Contadin & Renata Trevisan (forthcoming). Alicia Ouellette: Bioethics and Disability: Toward a Disability-Conscious Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-3.
    Alicia Ouellette’s Bioethics and Disability: Toward a Disability-Conscious Bioethics is the result of her “ten-year journey toward disability consciousness” (p. 5). By saying so, Ouellette suggests a bioethics “mindful of and knowledgeable about the fact of disability in bioethical cases” (p. 316). Thus, a common struggle should be overcome: bioethics versus the disability rights community.The book begins with an introduction to (and a brief history of) Bioethics on the one side and the disability rights community on the other. Ouellette then (...)
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  3. Jason T. Eberl (forthcoming). A Thomistic Appraisal of Human Enhancement Technologies. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-22.
    Debate concerning human enhancement often revolves around the question of whether there is a common “nature” that all human beings share and which is unwarrantedly violated by enhancing one’s capabilities beyond the “species-typical” norm. I explicate Thomas Aquinas’s influential theory of human nature, noting certain key traits commonly shared among human beings that define each as a “person” who possesses inviolable moral status. Understanding the specific qualities that define the nature of human persons, which includes self-conscious awareness, capacity for intellective (...)
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  4. William G. Hoy (forthcoming). Kenneth J. Doka, Amy S. Tucci, Charles A. Corr, and Bruce Jennings (Eds): End-of-Life Ethics: A Case Study Approach. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-5.
    As readers of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics undoubtedly know, edited books can be highly uneven in their quality, with some chapters excelling in content, depth, and readability while others languish in mediocrity. Volumes in an annually issued series run an even greater risk of suffering the plague of inferiority, especially after many years of fame and success. End-of-Life Ethics: A Case Study Approach clearly overcomes these maladies and provides readers with an excellent collection of well-written, thought-provoking essays.The Hospice Foundation of (...)
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  5. Jeff Levin (forthcoming). Alex Broadbent: Philosophy of Epidemiology. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-4.
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  6. Gregory S. Poore (forthcoming). Glenn McGee: Bioethics for Beginners: 60 Cases and Cautions From the Moral Frontier of Healthcare. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-4.
    Reading and reflecting on real cases helps ethics come alive for students. Good cases grip our attention, engage our imagination, and show the real-life implications of abstract ethical theories, ideals, commitments, and policies. Finding good case studies is both difficult and time-consuming for instructors, so I was excited to learn about Glenn McGee’s book Bioethics for Beginners: 60 Cases and Cautions from the Moral Frontier of Healthcare. According to the publisher, its target audiences are “courses in bioethics, medical ethics, and (...)
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  7. Julian Reiss (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable 2009. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics.
     
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  8. Tomasz Rzepiński (forthcoming). Randomized Controlled Trials Versus Rough Set Analysis: Two Competing Approaches for Evaluating Clinical Data. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-18.
    The present paper deals with the problem of evaluating empirical evidence for therapeutic decisions in medicine. The article discusses the views of Nancy Cartwright and John Worrall on the function that randomization plays in ascertaining causal relations with reference to the therapies applied. The main purpose of the paper is to present a general idea of alternative method of evaluating empirical evidence. The method builds on data analysis that makes use of rough set theory. The first attempts to apply the (...)
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  9. Jeremy R. Simon (forthcoming). Raffaella Campaner: Philosophy of Medicine: Causality, Evidence and Explanation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-5.
    The present volume is one of a type (collected papers by a single author on a topic) we should soon expect to be seeing more of in philosophy of medicine. Philosophy of medicine has now been around long enough that entire careers, or at least substantial portions of careers, can and have been devoted to it. This is an important milestone in the field.This is true, even though, as the author indicates in the introduction, this is not solely a book (...)
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