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Forthcoming articles
  1. Maria M. Boscolo Contadin & Renata Trevisan (forthcoming). Alicia Ouellette: Bioethics and Disability: Toward a Disability-Conscious Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-3.
    Alicia Ouellette’s Bioethics and Disability: Toward a Disability-Conscious Bioethics is the result of her “ten-year journey toward disability consciousness” (p. 5). By saying so, Ouellette suggests a bioethics “mindful of and knowledgeable about the fact of disability in bioethical cases” (p. 316). Thus, a common struggle should be overcome: bioethics versus the disability rights community.The book begins with an introduction to (and a brief history of) Bioethics on the one side and the disability rights community on the other. Ouellette then (...)
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  2. Ray Greek (forthcoming). Letter to the Editor. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-6.
    Dear Editor,The April 2014 issue of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics [1] presented eight essays regarding the use of nonhuman animals in biomedical research. While I appreciate the essays concerning contemporary research—which were well written and offered new thinking from the fields of ethics and ethology—I believe the journal, via the topics and the authors chosen, failed to communicate the most important fact regarding the current science pertinent to the use of nonhuman animals in research.The foundational reason for using chimpanzees and (...)
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  3. William G. Hoy (forthcoming). Kenneth J. Doka, Amy S. Tucci, Charles A. Corr, and Bruce Jennings (Eds): End-of-Life Ethics: A Case Study Approach. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-5.
    As readers of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics undoubtedly know, edited books can be highly uneven in their quality, with some chapters excelling in content, depth, and readability while others languish in mediocrity. Volumes in an annually issued series run an even greater risk of suffering the plague of inferiority, especially after many years of fame and success. End-of-Life Ethics: A Case Study Approach clearly overcomes these maladies and provides readers with an excellent collection of well-written, thought-provoking essays.The Hospice Foundation of (...)
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  4. Daniel Takarabe Kim (forthcoming). Paul Farmer, Jim Yong Kim, Arthur Kleinman, and Matthew Basilico (Eds.): Reimagining Global Health: An Introduction. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-6.
    The last decade has seen an explosion of interest in the health and welfare of marginalized communities around the world. In one striking indicator, public and private development assistance for health programs increased from $8.65 billion in 1998 to $21.79 billion in 2007 [1]. There has been emergent academic interest as well, with growing ranks of undergraduate and graduate students and professionals adopting the field as their specialty. Despite the burgeoning interest, however, much about the field remains unclear. Reimagining Global (...)
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  5. James A. Marcum (forthcoming). Hillel D. Braude: Intuition in Medicine: A Philosophical Defense of Clinical Reasoning. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-5.
    The book starts with a scandal, that is, Socrates’s mortality as entailed in the Aristotelian syllogism,All men are mortal,Socrates is a man,Therefore, Socrates is mortal. The scandal pertains to the deduction of Socrates’s death from the logical connections of premises, which, according to Braude, renders it “meaningless.” But, what does this scandal have to do with a philosophical defense of intuition in medicine? For Braude, the scandal is emblematic of a crisis in medicine and philosophy—a crisis in which human mortality (...)
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  6. Gregory S. Poore (forthcoming). Glenn McGee: Bioethics for Beginners: 60 Cases and Cautions From the Moral Frontier of Healthcare. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-4.
    Reading and reflecting on real cases helps ethics come alive for students. Good cases grip our attention, engage our imagination, and show the real-life implications of abstract ethical theories, ideals, commitments, and policies. Finding good case studies is both difficult and time-consuming for instructors, so I was excited to learn about Glenn McGee’s book Bioethics for Beginners: 60 Cases and Cautions from the Moral Frontier of Healthcare. According to the publisher, its target audiences are “courses in bioethics, medical ethics, and (...)
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  7. Julian Reiss (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable 2009. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics.
     
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  8. Anna Smajdor (forthcoming). How Useful is the Concept of the 'Harm Threshold' in Reproductive Ethics and Law? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-16.
    In his book Reasons and Persons, Derek Parfit suggests that people are not harmed by being conceived with a disease or disability if they could not have existed without suffering that particular condition. He nevertheless contends that entities can be harmed if the suffering they experience is sufficiently severe. By implication, there is a threshold which divides harmful from non-harmful conceptions. The assumption that such a threshold exists has come to play a part in UK policy making. I argue that (...)
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  9. Nicola J. Williams & John Harris (forthcoming). What is the Harm in Harmful Conception? On Threshold Harms in Non-Identity Cases. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-15.
    Has the time come to put to bed the concept of a harm threshold when discussing the ethics of reproductive decision making and the legal limits that should be placed upon it? In this commentary, we defend the claim that there exist good moral reasons, despite the conclusions of the non-identity problem, based on the interests of those we might create, to refrain from bringing to birth individuals whose lives are often described in the philosophical literature as ‘less than worth (...)
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