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Forthcoming articles
  1.  3
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). Ancillary Care Obligations in Light of an African Bioethic: From Entrustment to Communion. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37.
    Henry Richardson has recently published the first book ever devoted to ancillary care obligations, which roughly concern what medical researchers are morally required to provide to participants beyond what safety requires. In it Richardson notes that he has presented the ‘only fully elaborated view out there’ on this topic, which he calls the ‘partial-entrustment model’. In this article, I provide a new theory of ancillary care obligations, one that is grounded on ideals of communion salient in the African philosophical tradition (...)
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    Massimiliano Colucci (forthcoming). Richard Tutton: Genomics and the Reimagining of Personalized Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-6.
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  3. Stefan Dragulinescu (forthcoming). Inference to the Best Explanation and Mechanisms in Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-22.
    This article considers the prospects of inference to the best explanation as a method of confirming causal claims vis-à-vis the medical evidence of mechanisms. I show that IBE is actually descriptive of how scientists reason when choosing among hypotheses, that it is amenable to the balance/weight distinction, a pivotal pair of concepts in the philosophy of evidence, and that it can do justice to interesting features of the interplay between mechanistic and population level assessments.
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  4. Julian Reiss (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable 2009. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics.
     
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  5. David Wendler & Rebecca Johnson (forthcoming). When Clinical Care is Like Research: The Need for Review and Consent. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-17.
    The prevailing “segregated model” for understanding clinical research sharply separates it from clinical care and subjects it to extensive regulations and guidelines. This approach is based on the fact that clinical research relies on procedures and methods—research biopsies, blinding, randomization, fixed treatment protocols, placebos—that pose risks and burdens to participants in order to collect data that might benefit all patients. Reliance on these methods raises the potential for exploitation and unfairness, and thus points to the need for independent ethical review (...)
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