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Forthcoming articles
  1.  3
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). Ancillary Care Obligations in Light of an African Bioethic: From Entrustment to Communion. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37.
    Henry Richardson has recently published the first book ever devoted to ancillary care obligations, which roughly concern what medical researchers are morally required to provide to participants beyond what safety requires. In it Richardson notes that he has presented the ‘only fully elaborated view out there’ on this topic, which he calls the ‘partial-entrustment model’. In this article, I provide a new theory of ancillary care obligations, one that is grounded on ideals of communion salient in the African philosophical tradition (...)
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  2. Olaf Dammann (forthcoming). Causality, Mosaics, and the Health Sciences. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-8.
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  3.  3
    Espen Gamlund (forthcoming). What is so Important About Completing Lives? A Critique of the Modified Youngest First Principle of Scarce Resource Allocation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-16.
    Ruth Tallman has recently offered a defense of the modified youngest first principle of scarce resource allocation [1]. According to Tallman, this principle calls for prioritizing adolescents and young adults between 15–40 years of age. In this article, I argue that Tallman’s defense of the modified youngest first principle is vulnerable to important objections, and that it is thus unsuitable as a basis for allocating resources. Moreover, Tallman makes claims about the badness of death for individuals at different ages, but (...)
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  4.  1
    Mats Johansson & Linus Broström (forthcoming). Surrogate Consent to Non-Beneficial Research: Erring on the Right Side When Substituted Judgments May Be Inaccurate. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-12.
    Part of the standard protection of decisionally incapacitated research subjects is a prohibition against enrolling them unless surrogate decision makers authorize it. A common view is that surrogates primarily ought to make their decisions based on what the decisionally incapacitated subject would have wanted regarding research participation. However, empirical studies indicate that surrogate predictions about such preferences are not very accurate. The focus of this article is the significance of surrogate accuracy in the context of research that is not expected (...)
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  5. Julian Reiss (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Medicine Roundtable 2009. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics.
     
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  6.  4
    Sean A. Valles (forthcoming). The Challenges of Choosing and Explaining a Phenomenon in Epidemiological Research on the “Hispanic Paradox”. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-20.
    According to public health data, the US Hispanic population is far healthier than would be expected for a population with low socioeconomic status. Ever since Kyriakos Markides and Jeannine Coreil highlighted this in a seminal 1986 article, public health researchers have sought to explain the so-called “Hispanic paradox.” Several candidate explanations have been offered over the years, but the debate goes on. This article offers a philosophical analysis that clarifies how two sets of obstacles make it particularly difficult to explain (...)
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  7.  1
    Joseph Wu (forthcoming). Bradley, Ben: Well-Being. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-4.
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