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  1.  1
    Francesco Bellucci (2016). Inferences From Signs: Peirce and the Recovery of the Σημεῖον. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (2):259.
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  2. Daniel J. Brunson (2016). A Centennial Symposium in Honor of Josiah Royce. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (2):143.
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  3. Charles Royal Carlson (2016). Arthur Schopenhauer's Pessimism and Josiah Royce's Loyalty: Permanent Deposit or Scar? Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (2):148.
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  4. Robin Friedman (2016). Commemorating Royce — Revisiting The Royce Festschrift. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (2):201.
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  5. Kipton Jensen (2016). The Growing Edges of Beloved Community: From Royce to Thurman and King. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (2):239.
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  6.  1
    Jeff Kasser (2016). Confidence, Evidential Weight, and the Theory-Practice Divide in Peirce. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (2):285.
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  7. Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley (2016). Josiah Royce and C.I. Lewis: Teacher and Student with Many Shared Affinities. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (2):220.
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  8.  1
    Anthony Perovich (2016). Ethics And The Individuation Of The Self: Royce's “Dash Of Fichte”. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (2):166.
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  9. Lucio Angelo Privitello (2016). Josiah Royce on Nietzsche's Couch. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (2):179.
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  10.  3
    Jerold J. Abrams (2016). Richard Rorty, Liberalism and Cosmopolitanism by David E. McClean. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (1):118-122.
    David McClean’s book Richard Rorty, Liberalism and Cosmopolitanism is an excellent contribution to Rorty scholarship and pragmatism in general. The book begins with a masterful reconstruction of the tradition of American philosophy from Emerson and Thoreau to Peirce and James and Dewey, culminating in Rorty. This beginning, from the Preface entitled “Rorty’s ‘Violence of Direction’” to Chapter 1 entitled “From Pragmatism to Rortyism” occupies almost the first third, and seems to establish a three-part structure, of the book. The second part (...)
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  11.  2
    Richard Kenneth Atkins (2016). Direct Inspection and Phaneroscopic Analysis. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (1):1.
    Peirce repeatedly states that phaneroscopy involves analyzing the phaneron, or “the collective total of all that is in any way or in any sense present to the mind, quite regardless of whether it corresponds to any real thing or not”.1 Here are three representative quotations from different periods of Peirce’s work, all supporting the claim that phaneroscopy involves analysis:[The business of phaneroscopy is] to unravel the tangled skein [of] all that in any sense appears and wind it into distinct forms; (...)
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  12.  91
    Kenneth Boyd (2016). Peirce on Assertion, Speech Acts, and Taking Responsibility. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (1):21.
    C.S. Peirce held what is nowadays called a “commitment view” of assertion. According to this type of view, assertion is a kind of act that is determined by its “normative effects”: by asserting a proposition one undertakes certain commitments, typically to be able to provide reason to believe what one is asserting, or, in Peirce’s words, one “takes responsibility” for the truth of the proposition one asserts. Despite being an early adopter of the view, if Peirce’s commitment view of assertion (...)
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  13.  1
    E. Paul Colella (2016). The Geography of Strenuousness: “America” In William James' Narrative of Moral Energy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (1):93.
    In an essay entitled “Public Policy and Philosophical Critique: The William James and Theodore Roosevelt Dialogue on Strenuousness” Patrick Dooley examines the public discourse concerning the ebb and flow of moral energy that took place in America during twilight years of the nineteenth century. In it, he discusses how a diverse “community of investigators,” James and Roosevelt prominent among them, articulated a “common agenda of problems” in a cultural conversation concerning the benefits, moral as well as political, of the strenuous (...)
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  14.  2
    Robert W. King (2016). A Philosophy of Sacred Nature: Prospects for Ecstatic Naturalism Ed. By Leon Niemoczynski and Nam T. Nguyen. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (1):114-118.
    What are the possibilities for religious experience in the twenty-first century? While aggressive atheists might respond “None,” in thunder, any good Peircean knows we should not foreclose inquiry. For those who retain a post-orthodox religious temperament in post-modernity, Robert S. Corrington’s evolving account of Ecstatic Naturalism might prove a challenging, engaging framework for a transcendental naturalism. If one can read Emerson and Thoreau and ignore their religious dimension, so be it—attunement is crucial for Corrington, cultivating the habits of thought, the (...)
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  15.  4
    Pierre-Luc Dostie Proulx (2016). The Ethics of Detachment in Santayana's Philosophy by Michael Brodrick. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (1):125-128.
    Michael Brodrick’s book, The Ethics of Detachment in Santayana’s Philosophy, constitutes a much-needed contribution to the field of American philosophy. Although it is common for contemporary authors to claim that their preferred philosopher has been misunderstood, few can do so with as much conviction as Broderick has done for George Santayana, “a great and unjustly neglected philosopher”.The overarching goal of Brodrick’s investigation is the presentation of a conceptual framework for an “ethics of detachment” fundamentally mediated by human finitude. Setting his (...)
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  16.  3
    Alex Robins (2016). Art and Morality: Essays in the Spirit of Santayana by Morris Grossman. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (1):122-125.
    Morris Grossman, the author of this captivating collection of essays Art and Morality: Essays in the Spirit of Santayana, was fond of quoting Santayana as saying, “when Peter tells you something about Paul you learn more about Peter than you do Paul.” This aphorism appears several times in this volume, and its emphatic repetition should clue us into Grossman’s approach to expository writing. While the book is ostensibly about figures from the history of philosophy and art in individual essays, its (...)
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  17.  2
    James Southworth (2016). The Passional Nature and the Will to Believe. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (1):62.
    A central criticism of William James’s “The Will to Believe” is that it gives individuals a license for wishful thinking. There may be insufficient evidence with respect to the existence of God, but our willing to believe that God exists does not make it the case. Simply put, wanting something to be true does not make it true. Accordingly, some of James’s early critics proposed that the essay would have been more accurately titled “The Will to Deceive” or “The Will (...)
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  18.  1
    Aaron Stoller (2016). Time and the Creative Act. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (1):47.
    When philosophers consider art, they typically do so from the standpoint of an outside observer, yielding a description of the phenomenon as though it was in actuality a mode of philosophy. Here the work appears to have been constructed as part of a purely rational process, or at least dominated by logic and cognitive intention at all meaningful points along the way. In the final account the anoetic is eclipsed by the noetic, which is taken as its most important and (...)
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  19.  3
    Dwayne Tunstall (2016). Yet Another Way to Interpret The Problem of Christianity Fruitfully. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (1):79.
    Josiah Royce’s The Problem of Christianity has been studied in numerous ways since its publication in 1913. The most common approaches to studying PC among historians of classical American philosophy and Royce scholars are to regard it as a contribution to the psychology of religion, as a contribution to philosophy of religion, or as an application of Royce’s logical theory to the study of religion. Scholars who study PC as a contribution to the psychology of religion often emphasize such things (...)
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  20.  2
    Lawrence Cahoone (2016). Two Metaphysical Naturalisms: Aristotle and Justus Buchler by Victorino Tejera. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):539-542.
    The American philosophical school called “Columbia Naturalism” began with Aristotle. That is, the naturalist thinkers at Columbia University over the first half of the 20th century, including John Dewey and Ernest Nagel, began with F.J.E. Woodbridge, Columbia’s famed Aristotelian from 1902 to 1937 and founder of The Journal of Philosophy, Psychology, and Scientific Methods. Dewey arrived in 1904, retired in 1930. Later John Herman Randall took up the cause of interpreting Aristotle so as to be consistent with the “functionalist” naturalism (...)
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  21.  1
    S. J. Frank M. Oppenheim (2016). Revision of "Second Maximal Insight" Section: About Royce's Overall Intellectual Development. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):531-538.
    Courteously, Professor Jacquelyn Kegley, in her helpful and balanced book Josiah Royce in Focus, allocates her summary of responses to my 1976 hypothesis.2 My hypothesis stated that Royce’s intellectual development from 1875 to 1916 was aptly imagined as a triple-peaked affair.3 The jagged line of the Sierras’ peaks with its three highest may unduly distract from the emphasis also needed on the continuity and unique identity of the whole course of Royce’s thought and of the entire range of the Sierras (...)
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  22.  1
    David L. Hildebrand (2016). Dewey by Steven Fesmire. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):543-549.
    In recent years, a genre of introduction to philosophical figures and movements for non-specialists has gained in popularity; these introductions aim to be neither too cursory nor too laden with academic detail. Oxford’s “Very Short Introductions” and the “Wadsworth Notes” series are examples of the cursory type, while academic monographs are examples of the detailed type. Steven Fesmire’s Dewey is a welcome and unique contribution to the new introductory genre, joining similar efforts such as Raymond Boisvert’s John Dewey: Rethinking Our (...)
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  23.  1
    David Pfeifer (2016). Peirce: 5 Questions Ed. By Francesco Bellucci, Ahti-Veikko Pietarinen, Frederik Stjernfelt. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):549-552.
    Over thirty volumes in the “5 Questions” series have appeared. Each publication gives a contemporary picture of the state of studies within a specific area. This volume on Peirce studies is no different. The volume contains answers to the questions by thirty-five Peirce scholars. My only minor criticism of the volume is that I would have liked to have seen some additional authors included—but they may have been unable to participate. The essays indicate that numerous thinkers have been drawn to (...)
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  24.  2
    Sami Pihlström (2016). William James and the Quest for an Ethical Republic by Trygve Throntveit, And: Ethics and Philosophical Critique in William James by Sarin Marchetti. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):552-557.
    According to a received understanding of classical pragmatism, William James was not a moral and political philosopher. It has been assumed that he wrote only one article on ethics, “The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life”. In a sense this assumption is true; there is no book by him on ethics analogous to his major works addressing topics in epistemology, metaphysics, philosophical psychology, philosophy of religion, and theory of truth – or analogous to other classical pragmatists’, such as John Dewey’s, (...)
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  25.  1
    Sami Pihlström (2016). Ethics and Philosophical Critique in William James By Sarin Marchetti. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4).
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  26.  8
    David A. Dilworth (2016). Thinking Through the Imagination by John J. Kaag. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):384-389.
    On Peirce’s terms, the history of philosophy is a vast field of mind, a complexifying network of general ideas that contribute to the formation and valorization of human civilization through the expressions of individual authors and schools in their culturally specific times. The accumulating legacy of philosophical wisdom underwrites these individual expressions. But while for short term good reasons contemporary scholarship trends towards the exegesis of individual authors and schools, the “professional” practice runs the danger of being narrow-gauge in scholarly (...)
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  27.  4
    Colin Koopman (2016). Experience and Experimental Writing: Literary Pragmatism From Emerson to the Jameses by Paul Grimstad. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):381-384.
    In Experience and Experimental Writing, Paul Grimstad moves both forward out of contemporary pragmatism into its future and backward through the history of pragmatism to its zero moment at the proto-pragmatism of the philosophical inception of literary America in the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson and his contemporaries. This is the moment that F.O. Matthiessen, writing backward from 1941 during exactly that period about which it is often said that pragmatism fell from its mantles, summarized as “one extraordinarily concentrated moment (...)
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  28.  9
    José Filipe Silva & Kimmo Alho (2016). Neuroscience, Neurophilosophy, and Pragmatism: Brains at Work with the World Ed. By Tibor Solymosi & John R. Shook. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):389-393.
    The general aim of this very welcome volume is to explore the relation between pragmatism and neuroscience. The thirteen chapters are evenly divided into four parts, roughly organized around the themes of brain and pragmatism, emotion and cognition, creativity and education, and ethics.The beginning chapter written by the editors attempts to show that advances in behavioral and brain sciences intersect core theses of pragmatism with regards to cognition and the mind-world relation. The basic assumption is that neuroscience and pragmatism share (...)
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  29.  7
    Donald E. Stanley (2016). Cravings for Deliverance by Schulte Paul. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):393-394.
    William James, like his father before him, devoted much attention to religion. He defended the human desire to have faith in something, or some being, whose existence could not be empirically defended. Faith generated a feeling of ease and peacefulness, and therefore could be considered a moral good. In The Varieties of Religious Experience James argued that faith could be discovered and enacted in unconventional ways.Mr. Schulte has redefined James’s thesis to support Alcoholic Anonymous 3rd edition. He claims that James (...)
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