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  1. Daniel G. Campos (2015). The Role of Diagrammatic Reasoning in Ethical Deliberation. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):338.
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  2. Vincent Colapietro (2015). The Pragmatic Significance of “Lost Causes”: Reflections on Josiah Royce in Light of William James and Edward Said. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):277.
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  3. Jeffrey L. Kasser (2015). Structure and Content in "The Will to Believe". Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):320-337.
    This paper argues that sustained attention to the highlighted structure of William James's “The Will to Believe” yields surprising insights into the essay. “Highlighted structure” includes James's announcements of his intentions, his section breaks, and, especially, patterns of repetition and contrast within the work. Particular attention is paid to a criticism to which James frequently returns, viz. that evidentialists are driven by their passions to adopt evidentialism. I argue that James does not take this to constitute an objection to evidentialism (...)
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  4. William H. B. Mcauliffe (2015). How Did Abduction Get Confused with Inference to the Best Explanation? Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):300.
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  5. David W. Rodick (2015). The Issue of “Transitional Importance” in the Later Royce. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):358.
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  6.  5
    Richard Kenneth Atkins (2015). Peirce's “Paradoxical Irradiations” and James's The Will to Believe. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (2):173-200.
    In 1898, Peirce delivered a series of lectures titled Reasoning and the Logic of Things. Peirce scholars have found the first of those lectures—titled “Philosophy and the Conduct of Life”—especially perplexing.Some scholars have a decidedly negative assessment of Peirce’s lecture. Cornelis de Waal, for example, maintains that Peirce’s claims in the lecture are doubtful. He states that “Peirce... takes a radical stance, arguing emphatically that science should stay away from ‘matters of vital importance,’ moral problems among them, thereby denying the (...)
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  7.  10
    Cornelis de Waal (2015). Evidentialism and the Will to Believe by Scott F. Aikin. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (2):266-271.
    Scott Aikin’s Evidentialism and the Will to Believe is the first book-length discussion of W.K. Clifford’s 1877 “The Ethics of Belief ” and William James’s 1896 “The Will to Believe.” Except for twenty pages, the book splits evenly between a detailed discussion of the two essays. A good book demands some good criticism, and I am hoping that the comments I make are read in that light. Evidentialism and the Will to Believe appears in the Bloomsbury Research in Analytic Philosophy (...)
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  8. Review by: Cornelis de Waal (2015). Review: Scott F. Aikin. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (2):266-271.
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  9.  3
    Katarzyna Kremplewska (2015). Coping with Finitude: Santayana Reading Heidegger. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (2):225-265.
    There has been a long, surprisingly persistent tradition in labeling Santayana either as a unique and old fashioned figure of early twentieth century American philosophy, devoted to reviving metaphysics in a scholastic guise, or as a somewhat latent, closet pragmatist. This commonly held view was often additionally sealed in a dismissive way with the unpopular label of a quietist. In either case, the status of philosophical outcast was given to Santayana, echoing Charles William Eliot’s doubts as to the possible “usefulness” (...)
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  10.  1
    Thomas McLaughlin, Elize Bisanz, Scott R. Cunningham & Clyde Hendrick (2015). "Betagraphic": An Alternative Formulation of Predicate Calculus: Interdisciplinary Seminar on Peirce. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (2):137-172.
    There are at least a few plausible grounds for our use of the term Beta in our title, notwithstanding that there is a key departure, in our framework, from classical Beta Existential Graphs. The situation, in brief, is as follows.The reader accustomed to Peirce’s graphical development of quantificational logic may, if desired, continue to think of formulas being written on a “sheet of assertion.” We retain the “cut” notation for negation and continue to represent conjunction simply by juxtaposition of diagrams. (...)
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  11. Interdisciplinary Seminar on Peirce (2015). “Betagraphic”: An Alternative Formulation of Predicate Calculus. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (2):137.
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  12.  1
    Michael R. Slater (2015). William James in Focus: Willing to Believe by William J. Gavin, And: William James and the Art of Popular Statement by Paul Stob. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (2):271-275.
    William Gavin’s William James in Focus: Willing to Believe is a brief and creative introduction to James’s philosophy aimed at students and non-specialists. As the subtitle of the book suggests, Gavin uses James’s will to believe doctrine as the organizing theme for his interpretation of James’s philosophy. One might initially think that this implies reading the latter in the light of James’s views on religion, but Gavin downplays the religious aspects of James’s will to believe doctrine and focuses instead on (...)
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  13. Review by: Michael R. Slater (2015). Review: William J. Gavin. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (2):271-275.
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  14.  4
    Aaron Bruce Wilson (2015). Peirce and the A Priori. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (2):201-224.
    What exactly are Peirce’s views about the a priori?1Though the term “a priori” and others derived from it do not occur in Peirce’s writings very frequently, they occur often enough to motivate the above question. Their best known appearance is in his “The Fixation of Belief ”, in which he famously rejects the “a priori method” in favor of the “scientific method”. Of course, we cannot take this rejection alone as sufficient evidence that his philosophy is incompatible with any claim (...)
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  15.  2
    Review by: Roman Madzia (2015). Review: Becoming Mead: The Social Process of Academic Knowledge By Daniel R. Huebner. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (1):125-128.
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  16.  2
    Roman Madzia (2015). Becoming Mead: The Social Process of Academic Knowledge by Daniel R. Huebner. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (1):125-128.
    In the tradition of classical pragmatism, one could contend there are two kinds of thinkers. The first kind, represented most notably by William James and John Dewey, could be labeled as enthusiastic and prolific writers to whom it posed no difficulty to articulate their ideas at remarkable length and with enviable wit. The pragmatists of the second kind like Charles S. Peirce and George H. Mead, for various reasons, never managed to put their ideas on paper in the form of (...)
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  17.  1
    Helmut Pape (2015). Natural Propositions: The Actuality of Peirce's Doctrine of Dici-Signs by Frederik Stjernfelt. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (1):108-120.
    Frederik Stjernfelt’s book Natural Propositions is much more than just a study arguing for the actuality of Peirce’s notion of dicisign. Not unlike his 2007 treatise Diagrammatology, FS does many things at the same time, not all of them closely related to the project of a functional, naturalistic interpretation of Peirce’s concept of dicisigns and the relation of human cognition and animal, even microbiological processes to one another. The result is an inter- and transdisciplinary study that discusses and criticizes theories (...)
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  18.  3
    Review by: Helmut Pape (2015). Review: Natural Propositions: The Actuality of Peirce's Doctrine of Dicisigns By Frederik Stjernfelt. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (1):108-120.
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  19.  3
    Mark Porrovecchio (2015). F. C. S. Schiller's Last Pragmatism Course. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (1):57-107.
    Ferdinand Canning Scott Schiller was the foremost first-generation British pragmatist. A devoted champion of the Jamesian approach to pragmatism, he nonetheless distinguished his approach to the same with the label humanism, or pragmatism humanism. For the majority of his academic career Schiller was a professor at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. However, in 1926, he retired from teaching at Corpus Christi even as he retained a residence there that he used for part of each year. He spent the winters and springs (...)
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  20.  1
    Review by: Silviya Serafimova (2015). Review: Conservatism and Pragmatism in Law, Politics, and Ethics By Seth Vannatta. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (1):121-125.
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  21. Silviya Serafimova (2015). Conservatism and Pragmatism in Law, Politics, and Ethics by Seth Vannatta. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (1):121-125.
    Seth Vannatta’s book Conservatism and Pragmatism in Law, Politics, and Ethics is a thought-provoking inquiry challenging the reader to go beyond the clichés imposed by contemporary American everyday discourse, namely, to overcome associating conservatism with right wing politics, and pragmatism with the formula that practice determines what should work best in politics. He sets the ambitious goal of demonstrating how comparing rather than contrasting the visions of classical British conservative thought and classical American pragmatist philosophy contributes to revealing the (...)
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  22.  3
    T. L. Short (2015). Empiricism Expanded. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (1):1-33.
    Two aspects of Peirce’s mature philosophy seem to me not to have been sufficiently appreciated. They are its empiricist method and its continuity with his scientific research. The research led to and justified the method.1Ground must be cleared before we can proceed. Simplistic ideas of the empirical must be swept aside and Peirce’s empiricism accurately identified. We must also distinguish two theories of meaning that have been associated with empiricist philosophies and show that Peirce combined them ; this will be (...)
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  23.  4
    Marco Stango (2015). The Pragmatic Maxim and the Normative Sciences: Peirce's Problematical ‘Fourth’ Grade of Clarity. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (1):34-56.
    One of the crucial debates within pragmatism concerns the import of Charles S. Peirce’s “pragmatic maxim.” The aim of this article is to show that Peirce maintains a twofold attitude toward his maxim. I would call this twofold approach ‘problematical,’ not because it is the origin of inconsistencies within Peirce’s thought, but because the collocation and use of the pragmatic maxim constitutes a genuine problem upon which Peirce continued to reflect throughout his life.1 This problem concerns the relationship among semantics, (...)
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  24.  2
    Celia Bardwell-Jones (2015). Travel and Home: Conceiving Transnational Communities Through Royce's Betweenness Relation. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (4):501-522,.
    The “transnational turn” in ethnic studies, women’s studies and American studies has shifted the discussion of identity by focusing on the space-between, the liminal space that emerges as a starting point of reflecting on one’s varied social locations.1 In this essay, I would like to theorize the philosophical underpinnings of identity formation and the social ontology of transnational identities through the works of Josiah Royce. In theorizing about the betweenness relation, I examine two concepts in Royce’s work—travel and home—in order (...)
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  25.  2
    Francesco Bellucci (2015). “Logic, Considered as Semeiotic”: On Peirce's Philosophy of Logic. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (4):523-547,.
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  26.  1
    Andrew Howat (2015). Peirce on Grounding the Laws of Logic. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (4):480-500,.
    Instead of merely jeering at metaphysics … the pragmaticist extracts from it a precious essence, which will serve to give life and light to cosmology and physics.Nothing can be admitted to be absolutely inexplicable [hereafter, Peirce’s Rule].In his paper “Grounds of Validity of the Laws of Logic”, Peirce attempts to explain the validity of the syllogism :What could it possibly mean to explain the validity of a pattern of inference such as this one?2 Or more generally—what sort of explanations can (...)
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  27. James Jakób Liszka (2015). 2014 Presidential Address: Peirce's Idea of Ethics as a Normative Science. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (4):459-479,.
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  28.  2
    James Jakób Liszka (2015). Peirce's Idea of Ethics as a Normative Science. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (4):459-479.
    In his later years, Peirce proposed the idea of ethics as a normative science. Is such a thing possible? John Dewey asks “whether scientific propositions about the direction of human conduct, about any situation into which the idea of should enters, are possible; and, if so, of what sort they are and the grounds upon which they rest”. If the meaning of ‘science’ here is taken in its contemporary sense—the way in which physics or biology might be understood—then normative science (...)
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  29. Review by: Sami Pihlström (2015). Review: Pragmatism and the Philosophy of Religion By Michael J. Slater. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (4):605-609,.
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  30.  1
    Seth Vannatta (2015). Michael Oakeshott's Metaphysics of Experience Through the Lens of American Pragmatism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (4):581-604,.
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  31.  1
    James R. Wible (2015). Peirce's Economic Model in the First Harvard Lecture on Pragmatism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (4):548-580,.
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