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  1. Albert Atkin (2016). Intellectual Hope as Convenient Friction. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):444-462.
    Pragmatist approaches to truth have often been judged in light of a caricature of William James’ claim that, “the ‘true’ is only the expedient in our way of thinking”. This unfortunate caricature, where truth is claimed to be ‘whatever it’s useful to believe’, means pragmatist theories of truth are generally seen as non-starters, or unworthy of serious attention. And even leaving aside stalking-horse versions of classical pragmatism, there is also a view that whatever contemporary pragmatists have been doing with ‘truth’ (...)
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  2. Lawrence Cahoone (2016). Two Metaphysical Naturalisms: Aristotle and Justus Buchler by Victorino Tejera. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):539-542.
    The American philosophical school called “Columbia Naturalism” began with Aristotle. That is, the naturalist thinkers at Columbia University over the first half of the 20th century, including John Dewey and Ernest Nagel, began with F.J.E. Woodbridge, Columbia’s famed Aristotelian from 1902 to 1937 and founder of The Journal of Philosophy, Psychology, and Scientific Methods. Dewey arrived in 1904, retired in 1930. Later John Herman Randall took up the cause of interpreting Aristotle so as to be consistent with the “functionalist” naturalism (...)
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  3. Shannon Dea (2016). Meaning, Inquiry, and the Rule of Reason: A Hookwayesque Colligation. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):401-418.
    In their 2005 paper, “Why Pragmatists Cannot be Pluralists,” Robert Talisse and Scott Aikin draw a distinction between meaning pragmatists and inquiry pragmatists. For meaning pragmatists, the main focus of the pragmatic method is the elucidation of the meanings of concepts and propositions. Talisse and Aikin list among meaning pragmatists such figures as James, the Peirce of “How to Make Our Ideas Clear,” Quine, and Rorty. For inquiry pragmatists, by contrast, the method of pragmatism is primarily a method to guide (...)
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  4. Russell Duvernoy (2016). 'Concepts' and Continuity: Onto-Epistemology in William James. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):508-530.
    The diversity of William James’s intellectual pursuits and accomplishments is an oft-observed truism. James is remembered as a pioneer of psychology, a public intellectual and lecturer, one of the founding figures of pragmatism, and an explorer of religious and psychic phenomena. James’s wide ranging energies in an age before today’s entrenched disciplinary boundaries led Cornel West to characterize him as “an authentic American intellectual frontiersman.”1 More recently, Francesca Bordogna has described this multiplicity of interests in terms of “boundary work,” providing (...)
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  5. S. J. Frank M. Oppenheim (2016). Revision of "Second Maximal Insight" Section: About Royce's Overall Intellectual Development. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):531-538.
    Courteously, Professor Jacquelyn Kegley, in her helpful and balanced book Josiah Royce in Focus, allocates her summary of responses to my 1976 hypothesis.2 My hypothesis stated that Royce’s intellectual development from 1875 to 1916 was aptly imagined as a triple-peaked affair.3 The jagged line of the Sierras’ peaks with its three highest may unduly distract from the emphasis also needed on the continuity and unique identity of the whole course of Royce’s thought and of the entire range of the Sierras (...)
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  6. David L. Hildebrand (2016). Dewey by Steven Fesmire. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):543-549.
    In recent years, a genre of introduction to philosophical figures and movements for non-specialists has gained in popularity; these introductions aim to be neither too cursory nor too laden with academic detail. Oxford’s “Very Short Introductions” and the “Wadsworth Notes” series are examples of the cursory type, while academic monographs are examples of the detailed type. Steven Fesmire’s Dewey is a welcome and unique contribution to the new introductory genre, joining similar efforts such as Raymond Boisvert’s John Dewey: Rethinking Our (...)
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  7. Christopher J. Hookway (2016). Comments on Essays From Conference "The Idea of Pragmatism". Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):397-400.
    My initial education in philosophy was in Oxford and in the philosophy of ‘ordinary language’ and the philosophy of language. My heroes were Wittgenstein and H.P Grice. I was intrigued by showing how metaphysical or ontological theories could be disposed of as lacking meaning. While I was studying for an M.A. at the University of East Anglia, I was taught by Martin Hollis who led me to read C.I. Lewis’s Mind and The World Order. The book was a challenge and (...)
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  8. Andrew W. Howat (2016). Hookway's Peirce on Assertion & Truth. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):419-443.
    pragmatic clarifications of concepts and propositions are best seen as accounts of the commitments we incur when we assert or judge the proposition in question.For those unfamiliar with the distinctive character and methodology of Peirce’s philosophy, it typically appears as though Peirce identifies truth with a particular epistemic property.4 On this interpretation, Peircean Truth is the view that a true proposition is one that would, at least under certain conditions, generate convergence of opinion among rational inquirers, or something along these (...)
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  9.  4
    Philip Kitcher (2016). Pragmatism and Progress. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):475-494.
    The concept of progress figures centrally in pragmatism in two apparently distinct ways. In the writings of Dewey, concepts of ethical and social progress play a major role: the task of philosophy is to promote progress across many domains of human inquiry and practice. Philosophers should foster progressive shifts with respect to the urgent problems of the age. Democracy is unfinished, and both Democracy and Education and The Public and its Problems are concerned with ways in which the progress of (...)
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  10.  1
    Cheryl Misak (2016). Ramsey's Cognitivism: Truth, Ethics, and the Meaning of Life. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):463-474.
    In 1925, the 22 year old Frank Ramsey read a provocative paper to the Apostles titled “On There Being No Discussable Subject”. Many of the papers presented to this ‘Cambridge Conversazione Society’ were not terribly serious, and most have left minimal trace. But after Ramsey died in 1930 just shy of his 27th birthday, this paper was pulled from his manuscript remains by Richard Braithwaite, and printed in the posthumously-published The Foundations of Mathematics, under the title “Epilogue”. A snappy passage (...)
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  11. David Pfeifer (2016). Peirce: 5 Questions Ed. By Francesco Bellucci, Ahti-Veikko Pietarinen, Frederik Stjernfelt. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):549-552.
    Over thirty volumes in the “5 Questions” series have appeared. Each publication gives a contemporary picture of the state of studies within a specific area. This volume on Peirce studies is no different. The volume contains answers to the questions by thirty-five Peirce scholars. My only minor criticism of the volume is that I would have liked to have seen some additional authors included—but they may have been unable to participate. The essays indicate that numerous thinkers have been drawn to (...)
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  12. Sami Pihlström (2016). William James and the Quest for an Ethical Republic by Trygve Throntveit, And: Ethics and Philosophical Critique in William James by Sarin Marchetti. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):552-557.
    According to a received understanding of classical pragmatism, William James was not a moral and political philosopher. It has been assumed that he wrote only one article on ethics, “The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life”. In a sense this assumption is true; there is no book by him on ethics analogous to his major works addressing topics in epistemology, metaphysics, philosophical psychology, philosophy of religion, and theory of truth – or analogous to other classical pragmatists’, such as John Dewey’s, (...)
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  13.  1
    Hilary Putnam (2016). Hookway and Quine. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (4):495-507.
    On July 3, 2014, Chris Hookway sent me a message that read: “I don’t know if you are familiar with the letter I had from Quine when I sent him my Quine book back in 1988 [the letter is dated May 31, 1988– HP]. I learned a lot from it, and I found the letter very encouraging. In case you are interested, here is a copy of the letter.” It turns out that, the letter had never been published, and so (...)
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  14.  6
    Daniel G. Campos (2016). The Role of Diagrammatic Reasoning in Ethical Deliberation. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):338-357.
    In the 1903 lecture “What Makes a Reasoning Sound?” Charles Peirce provides a detailed account of the process of ethical deliberation intended to shape right conduct. He does this in the context of arguing against the claim that there is no distinction between moral right and wrong. He considered the argument for this claim to be analogous to the argument for the claim that there is no distinction between good and bad reasoning.1 Though Peirce’s ultimate concern in the lecture is (...)
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  15.  3
    Vincent Colapietro (2016). The Pragmatic Significance of "Lost Causes": Reflections on Josiah Royce in Light of William James and Edward Said. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):277-299.
    Loyalty to lost causes is not only a possible thing, but one of the most potent influences of human historyThe aim of this paper is to probe a critical aspect of human displacement, especially in the metaphorical sense of being thrust by disillusionment from the sustaining matrix of a hopeful cause.2 But displacement in the metaphorical sense is often tied to it in the straightforward literal sense.3 One’s place in the world is usurped because one’s home is expropriated or because (...)
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  16.  5
    David A. Dilworth (2016). Thinking Through the Imagination by John J. Kaag. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):384-389.
    On Peirce’s terms, the history of philosophy is a vast field of mind, a complexifying network of general ideas that contribute to the formation and valorization of human civilization through the expressions of individual authors and schools in their culturally specific times. The accumulating legacy of philosophical wisdom underwrites these individual expressions. But while for short term good reasons contemporary scholarship trends towards the exegesis of individual authors and schools, the “professional” practice runs the danger of being narrow-gauge in scholarly (...)
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  17.  3
    Colin Koopman (2016). Experience and Experimental Writing: Literary Pragmatism From Emerson to the Jameses by Paul Grimstad. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):381-384.
    In Experience and Experimental Writing, Paul Grimstad moves both forward out of contemporary pragmatism into its future and backward through the history of pragmatism to its zero moment at the proto-pragmatism of the philosophical inception of literary America in the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson and his contemporaries. This is the moment that F.O. Matthiessen, writing backward from 1941 during exactly that period about which it is often said that pragmatism fell from its mantles, summarized as “one extraordinarily concentrated moment (...)
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  18.  13
    William H. B. Mcauliffe (2016). How Did Abduction Get Confused with Inference to the Best Explanation? Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):300-319.
    Peirce believed that inquiry involves three types of reasoning—abduction, deduction, and induction. While Peirce’s beliefs about reasoning, especially abduction, changed over time, in his mature work the following picture of reasoning emerges: abduction generates and chooses hypotheses to test; deduction determines the entailments of a hypothesis; induction ascertains whether the evidence accords with the hypothesis in question.1 Peirce both identified abduction and coined the word.2 His concept of abduction is one of the most original contributions he made to the study (...)
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  19.  6
    David W. Rodick (2016). The Issue of "Transitional Importance" in the Later Royce. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):358-380.
    Royce’s intellectual growth was ever changing, ever constant. In his first book he treats of a subject on which his thoughts were largely engaged at the time of his death. But how differently the subject was conceived!I myself have spent my life in revising my opinions.The American philosopher Josiah Royce is often caricatured as advocating a “block universe”—a dyed-in-the-wool idealist viewing the self as a function of the Absolute. The classic expression is the famous photograph of Royce sitting with William (...)
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  20.  8
    José Filipe Silva & Kimmo Alho (2016). Neuroscience, Neurophilosophy, and Pragmatism: Brains at Work with the World Ed. By Tibor Solymosi & John R. Shook. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):389-393.
    The general aim of this very welcome volume is to explore the relation between pragmatism and neuroscience. The thirteen chapters are evenly divided into four parts, roughly organized around the themes of brain and pragmatism, emotion and cognition, creativity and education, and ethics.The beginning chapter written by the editors attempts to show that advances in behavioral and brain sciences intersect core theses of pragmatism with regards to cognition and the mind-world relation. The basic assumption is that neuroscience and pragmatism share (...)
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  21.  6
    Donald E. Stanley (2016). Cravings for Deliverance by Schulte Paul. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):393-394.
    William James, like his father before him, devoted much attention to religion. He defended the human desire to have faith in something, or some being, whose existence could not be empirically defended. Faith generated a feeling of ease and peacefulness, and therefore could be considered a moral good. In The Varieties of Religious Experience James argued that faith could be discovered and enacted in unconventional ways.Mr. Schulte has redefined James’s thesis to support Alcoholic Anonymous 3rd edition. He claims that James (...)
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