Year:

  1.  7
    Lucinda Carspecken (2015). The Unbounded Self: Peak Experiences and Border Crossings in Southern Indiana. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (2):143-155.
    In early visits to Lothlorien—which is a loosely Pagan community of environmentalists in Indiana—I was confounded by attempts to categorize either the place or the people. As one of the founders said, “I tend to run from labels so I don't know what I am. It's safer that way.” In this paper I explore four members’ narratives about the emotional high points in their lives, where they often cross the usual boundaries of self and other. At the same time the (...)
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  2.  1
    Julia L. Cassaniti (2015). Intersubjective Affect and Embodied Emotion: Feeling the Supernatural in Thailand. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (2):132-142.
    In this article I argue for increased attention to the supernatural as a site for inquiry into, and elaboration of, affect. In attending to how and when people encounter ghosts in Thailand, affect is approached as a moving, interpersonal field of wishes and desires. These wishes and desires circulate within intersubjective spaces, and are sometimes experienced as coalesced, embodied emotions. In highlighting such an orientation, affect can be understood as not just an intersubjective project but also a spiritual one. I (...)
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  3.  1
    Gretchen M. Herrmann (2015). Valuing Affect: The Centrality of Emotion, Memory, and Identity in Garage Sale Exchange. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (2):170-181.
    This article draws upon affect theory to analyze transformations of garage sale sellers through the exchange of their affectively charged possessions. Garage sales are awash with human emotion; they feature used personal belongings suffused with identities, histories, stories, and memories that are moved along with affect. The objects for sale are “sticky” in that they act as vessels and glue for strands of sentiment to reflexively pass between sellers and buyers, transmitting affective orientations, whether positive or negative. The affective elements (...)
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  4.  8
    Ian Skoggard & Alisse Waterston (2015). Introduction: Toward an Anthropology of Affect and Evocative Ethnography. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (2):109-120.
    A growing interest in affect holds much promise for anthropology by providing a new frame to examine and articulate subjective and intersubjective states, which are key parts of human consciousness and behavior. Affect has its roots in the social, an observation that did not go unnoticed by Durkheim and since then has been kept in view by those social scientists interested in the emotions, feelings, and subjectivity. However, the challenge for ethnographers has always been to articulate in words and conceptualize (...)
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  5. Nehemia Akiva Stern (2015). “I Desire Sanctity”: Sanctity and Separateness Among Jewish Religious Zionists in Israel/Palestine. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (2):156-169.
    This article expands on anthropological understandings of affect and emotion to include certain theological and religious concepts that structure and give meaning to the daily lives of religious nationalists in areas of ethnic and political conflict. In doing so, it will ethnographically explore the relationship between theological notions of sanctity and the way those notions manifest themselves in the context of contemporary Jewish religious Zionism in both Israel and the Occupied West Bank. I will argue that analyzing mystical conceptions of (...)
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  6.  1
    Jennifer L. Syvertsen & Angela Robertson Bazzi (2015). Sex Work, Heroin Injection, and HIV Risk in Tijuana: A Love Story. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (2):182-194.
    The relationships between female sex workers and their noncommercial male partners are typically viewed as sites of HIV risk rather than meaningful unions. This ethnographic case study presents a nuanced portrayal of the relationship between Cindy and Beto, a female sex worker who injects drugs and her intimate, noncommercial partner who live in Tijuana, Mexico. On the basis of ethnographic research in Tijuana and our long-term involvement in a public health study, we suggest that emotions play a central role in (...)
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  7. Edith Turner (2015). The Spirituality of Africa: The First Encounter. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (2):121-131.
    The article shows some moving occasions during the first fieldwork of Victor Turner and myself in Africa during the 1950s. For instance, the Ndembu people would always give great welcomes to their returning kin after long absences. The scenes are etched on my mind as a blueprint for all welcomes. On their friends return, the villagers would immediately gather and sing the simple song, “You're back, you're back!” Why did the people so much value each other? In this village I (...)
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  8.  5
    Ismael Apud (2015). Ayahuasca From Peru to Uruguay: Ritual Design and Redesign Through a Distributed Cognition Approach. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (1):1-27.
    Ayahuasca is a psychoactive substance from the Amazon rainforest regions of Peru, Colombia, Ecuador, and Brazil. Although its use originated among indigenous tribes in the Amazon basin, it has become increasingly popularized in Western society through the transnational markets of spirituality and religiosity driven by globalization, Postmodernity, and new forms of religious practice. In this paper, we will overview the arrival of ayahuasca in Uruguay by way of four different groups. We will then focus on one of these groups, a (...)
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  9.  12
    Giuseppe Iurato (2015). A Brief Comparison of the Unconscious as Seen by Jung and Lévi‐Strauss. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (1):60-107.
    Retracing the primary common aspects between anthropological and psychoanalytic thought, in this article, we will further discuss the main common points between the notions of the unconscious according to Carl Gustav Jung and Claude Lévi-Strauss, taking into account the thought of Erich Neumann. On the basis of very simple elementary logic considerations centered around the basic notion of the separation of opposites, our observations might be useful for speculations on the possible origins of rational thought and hence on the origins (...)
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  10.  4
    Wan‐chi Wong (2015). The Role of Cultural Sign in Cultivating the Dialogical Self: The Case of The Ox‐Herding Pictures. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (1):28-59.
    Based on a newly conceptualized notion of the dialogical self, achieved by integrating Bakhtin's philosophical anthropology and Karmiloff-Smith's Representational Redescription model into the existing notion proposed by Hermans and colleagues, the present study focuses on examining the role of The Ox-Herding Pictures in cultivating the dialogical self. Methodologically, this study adopted the cultural-historical perspective and microdevelopmental approach of Vygotsky. In-depth case studies consisting of six interrelated phases of interviews and written responses were conducted. The results show that such a unique (...)
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