Year:

  1. Jon Bialecki (2014). Does God Exist in Methodological Atheism? On Tanya Lurhmann's When God Talks Back and Bruno Latour. Anthropology of Consciousness 25 (1):32-52.
    In the anthropology of Christianity, and more broadly in the anthropology of religion, methodological atheism has foreclosed ethnographic description of God as a social actor. This prohibition is the product of certain ontological presumptions regarding agency, an absence of autonomy of human creations, and a truncated conception of what can be said to exist. Reading Tanya Luhrmann's recent ethnography, When God Talks Back: Understanding the American Evangelical Relationship with God (2012), in light of both the ontological postulates of Object Orientated (...)
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  2. Bonnie Glass‐Coffin (2014). Cave and Cosmos: Shamanic Encounters with Another Reality. Michael Harner, Ed. Berkley: North Atlantic Books, 2013. 312 Pp. ISBN 978‐1‐58394‐546‐9, $13.95. [REVIEW] Anthropology of Consciousness 25 (1):141-142.
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  3. Julie Laplante (2014). On Knowing and Not Knowing “Life” in Molecular Biology and Xhosa Healing: Ontologies in the Preclinical Trial of a South African Indigenous Medicine (Muthi). Anthropology of Consciousness 25 (1):1-31.
    Seemingly distant practices of molecular biology and indigenous Xhosa healing have commonalities that I would like to bring into conversation in this article. The preclinical trial of an indigenous medicine brings them together in a research consortium. In this instance, both sets of experts are meant to collaborate in preparing a wild bush for it to pass the tests of the randomized clinical trial (RCT) and to potentially become a biopharmaceutical to counter the tuberculosis pandemic. I aim to tease out (...)
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  4. Bernhard Leistle (2014). From the Alien to the Other: Steps Toward a Phenomenological Theory of Spirit Possession. Anthropology of Consciousness 25 (1):53-90.
    In this article, I apply a structural-phenomenological conception of experience and self to the anthropological theorizing of spirit possession. In particular, I argue that a phenomenology of the alien, as elaborated by the philosopher Bernhard Waldenfels, allows for a more differentiated understanding of possession phenomena. Following a characterization of alienness—in conceptual distinction from the more common term “otherness”—as a dimension that necessarily eludes experience, I describe spirit possession as a cultural technology to appropriate the experiential alien by transforming it into (...)
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  5. Emma Scott (2014). The Visionary Psyche: Jung's Analytical Psychology and Its Impact on Theories of Shamanic Imagery. Anthropology of Consciousness 25 (1):91-115.
    This article considers the shaman's visionary encounters with spirit beings from the critical viewpoint of several innovative theories of shamanism: Richard Noll's cognitive approach and Michael Winkelman's neurophenomenological perspective. These distinct approaches are analyzed in light of Jung's central concepts of the archetypes, the collective unconscious, and the individuation process, which have had a huge formative influence upon the academic investigation of visions and spiritual experiences. The centrality of Jung's theoretical reasoning within these recent studies of shamanism strongly demonstrates the (...)
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  6. Wenyi Zhang (2014). Bearing the Decline of Animal Sacrifice: Enhanced State of Consciousness, Illness, Taboos, and the Government in Southwest China. Anthropology of Consciousness 25 (1):116-140.
    In this study, I analyze how economic development projects and the ethnic tourism project in Southwest China have contributed to the failure of the ethnic Kachin villagers to observe taboos involved in shamanic healing rituals. Such a failure, initially as a local response to politico-economic processes in Southwest China, exacerbates the increasingly poor health status of Kachin shamans in the local community. Taboos thus become an active site where the local decline of animal sacrifice intersects with regional processes of economic (...)
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