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  1.  5
    Mark Bevir & Naomi Choi (2015). Anglophone Historicisms. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (3):327-346.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 327 - 346 This paper explores the place of historicism in Anglophone and especially analytic philosophy. Analytic philosophy arose as part of a general modernist revolt against the developmental historicisms of the nineteenth century with their faith in progress. Modernism inspired more formal approaches to knowledge, philosophy, and the human sciences. It is, however, a mistake to assume the rise of modernism and analytic philosophy left no space for historicism. Three main traditions of (...)
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  2.  7
    Andrius Gališanka (2015). History as Philosophy? Genealogies and Critique. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (3):444-464.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 444 - 464 Are genealogies of our beliefs relevant to the truth of these beliefs? Drawing on Bernard Williams’s _Truth and Truthfulness_, I argue that genealogies, or historical narratives showing how a set of beliefs came about, can be either critical or vindicatory of these beliefs. They can be critical by denaturalizing beliefs, showing their continued inability to solve explanatory problems, revealing the origins of these beliefs in assumptions that we no longer accept, (...)
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  3.  5
    Loren Goldman (2015). Richard Rorty’s ‘Post-Kantian’ Philosophy of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (3):410-443.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 410 - 443 This article contends that despite Richard Rorty’s famous rejection of metaphysics, his work nonetheless offers a philosophy of history, and that his account mirrors that of Kant’s, a figure Rorty considered one of his primary conceptual adversaries. Although Rorty often presents his approach to history as a foil to Kant’s, his account has striking parallels to the latter’s regulative meliorism. In similar fashion, far from being a blind optimist, Kant (...)
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  4.  3
    Petri Koikkalainen (2015). The Politics of Contextualism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (3):347-371.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 347 - 371 A central purpose of historicist contextualism, or the “new history of political thought”, the central methodological ideas of which were laid out between the 1950s and the 70s, was to liberate the history of ideas from distorting influence of political ideology, nationalism, and other presentist narratives that ascribed past events under false teleologies. From the 1980s onwards, it has been possible to find explicitly normative statements in the works of the (...)
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  5.  14
    Constantine Sandis (2015). One Fell Swoop. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (3):372-392.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 372 - 392 In this essay I revisit some anti-causalist arguments relating to reason-giving explanations of action put forth by numerous philosophers writing in the late ‘50s and early ‘60s in what Donald Davidson dismissively described as a ‘neo-Wittgensteinian current of small red books’. While chiefly remembered for subscribing to what has come to be called the ‘logical connection’ argument, the positions defended across these volumes are in fact as diverse as they are (...)
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  6.  4
    Karsten R. Stueber (2015). The Cognitive Function of Narratives. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (3):393-409.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 393 - 409 This essay will utilize the central historicist insight about the nature of the historical world and historical writing in articulating the cognitive function of narratives. It will argue that full-blown narratives are best understood as developmental portraits of a chosen entity/ unit in respect to its individuality. The argument will proceed through a critical analysis of the debate between Noel Carroll and David Velleman about the nature of the narrative connection (...)
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  7.  1
    Thomas H. Ford (2015). The Natural History of Aesthetics. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (2):220-239.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 220 - 239 Art has been crucial for Western philosophy roughly since Kant – that is, for what is becoming known as “correlationist” philosophy – because it has so often had assigned to it a singular ontological status. The artwork, in this view, is material being that has been transfigured and shot through with subjectivity. The work of art, what art does and how it works have all been understood as mediating between the (...)
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  8.  1
    Ian Hesketh (2015). The Recurrence of the Evolutionary Epic. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (2):196-219.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 196 - 219 In his 1978 On Human Nature, Edward Wilson defined the evolutionary epic as the scientific story of all life, a linear narrative beginning with the big bang and ending with the story of human history. Since that time several popular science writers have attempted to write that story of life producing such titles as The Universe Story and The Epic of Evolution. Historians have also gotten into the act under the (...)
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  9. Ian Hesketh & Knox Peden (2015). The Aesthetics of Scale. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (2):169-175.
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  10.  1
    Allan Megill (2015). “Big History” Old and New: Presuppositions, Limits, Alternatives. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (2):306-326.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 306 - 326 In recent years David Christian and others have promoted “Big History” as an innovative approach to the study of the past. The present paper juxtaposes to Big History an old Big History, namely, the tradition of “universal history” that flourished in Europe from the mid-sixteenth century until well into the nineteenth century. The claim to universality of works in that tradition depended on the assumed truth of Christianity, a fact that (...)
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  11.  5
    Dalia Nassar (2015). Analogy, Natural History and the Philosophy of Nature: Kant, Herder and the Problem of Empirical Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (2):240-257.
  12.  2
    Knox Peden (2015). Hayden White’s Metahistory and the Irony of the Archive. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (2):177-195.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 177 - 195 Hayden White’s contention that “moral and aesthetic” preferences are primary in shaping a historian’s vision of the past seems to play in to various contemporary efforts to consider history at a scale conducive to insight into climate change and global political dilemmas. Nevertheless, his critique of the archive as a repository of truth acquires new resonance as the naturalist and technological reconfiguration of the archive accompanying these developments gets underway. (...)
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  13. Leigh T. I. Penman (2015). The Hidden History of the Cosmopolitan Concept. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (2):284-305.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 284 - 305 Despite the ubiquity of contemporary debate in learned and popular cultures concerning the place of the cosmopolitan and cosmopolitanism, the historical background to this peculiarly Western vision of world unity remains understudied and virtually unknown. This is particularly the case, rather surprisingly, for the early modern period, when the term “cosmopolite” reappeared in European vocabularies for the first time since antiquity. It is during this period, however, that the most significant, (...)
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  14.  3
    Alison Ross (2015). Historical Citation and Revolutionary Epistemology. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (2):258-283.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 258 - 283 This article defends the thesis that there are multiple points of exchange between the categories of “word” and “image” in Walter Benjamin’s Arcades Project. Benjamin describes the truth of the articulate wish of the past as “graphically perceptible” and the image as “readable.” In this respect the vocabulary of “word” and “image” that Benjamin’s early work had opposed are not just deployed in concert, but specific features of the vocabulary of (...)
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  15.  2
    Francesco Boldizzoni (2015). Politics and the Neutralization of History: A Reply. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (1):41-50.
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  16.  2
    Francesco Boldizzoni (2015). On History and Policy: Time in the Age of Neoliberalism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (1):4-17.
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  17.  4
    Andrew Fiala (2015). Sacrifice, Abandonment, and Historical Nihilism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (1):51-70.
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  18.  27
    Serge Grigoriev (2015). Hume and the Historicity of Human Nature. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (1):118-139.
  19.  1
    Arjo Klamer (2015). Francesco Boldizzoni: A Critical Comment. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (1):27-32.
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  20.  5
    C. Behan McCullagh (2015). The Truth of Basic Historical Descriptions. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (1):97-117.
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  21.  7
    Konstantinos Sargentis (2015). Crisis, Evil, and Progress in Kant’s Philosophy of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (1):71-96.
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  22.  9
    Olga Stoliarova (2015). The Ontological Significance of the History of Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (1):140-165.
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  23.  2
    Wolfgang Streeck (2015). Comment on “On History and Policy: Time in the Age of Neoliberalism”. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (1):33-40.
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  24.  3
    Adam Tooze (2015). Contra Boldizzoni: Bringing “Pseudohistory” Back In. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (1):18-26.
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