20 found

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Forthcoming articles
  1. Sarah Malanowski & Nicholas Baima (forthcoming). On Treating Athletes with Banned Substances: The Relationship Between Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Hypopituitarism, and Hormone Replacement Therapy. Neuroethics:1-12.
    Until recently, the problem of traumatic brain injury in sports and the problem of performance enhancement via hormone replacement have not been seen as related issues. However, recent evidence suggests that these two problems may actually interact in complex and previously underappreciated ways. A body of recent research has shown that traumatic brain injuries (TBI), at all ranges of severity, have a negative effect upon pituitary function, which results in diminished levels of several endogenous hormones, such as growth hormone and (...)
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  2. L. Syd M. Johnson (forthcoming). Sport-Related Neurotrauma and Neuroprotection: Are Return-to-Play Protocols Justified by Paternalism? Neuroethics:1-12.
    Sport-related neurotrauma annually affects millions of athletes worldwide. The return-to-play protocol (RTP) is the dominant strategy adopted by sports leagues and organizations to manage one type of sport-related neurotrauma: concussions. RTPs establish guidelines for when athletes with concussions are to be removed from competition or practice, and when they can return. RTPs are intended to be neuroprotective, and to protect athletes from some of the harms of sport-related concussions, but there is athlete resistance to and noncompliance with RTPs. This prompts (...)
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  3. Daniel Mendelsohn, Charles S. Haw & Judy Illes (forthcoming). Convergent Expert Views on Decision-Making for Decompressive Craniectomy in Malignant MCA Syndrome. Neuroethics:1-8.
    Background and PurposeThe decision to perform decompressive craniectomy for patients with malignant MCA syndrome can be ethically complex. We investigated factors that clinicians consider in this decision-making process.MethodsA survey including clinical vignettes and attitudes questions surrounding the use of hemicraniectomy in malignant MCA syndrome was distributed to 203 neurosurgeons, neurologists, staff and residents, and nurses and allied health members specializing in the care of neurological patients. These were practicing health care providers situated in an urban setting in Canada where access (...)
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  4. Kasper Raus, Farah Focquaert, Maartje Schermer, Jona Specker & Sigrid Sterckx (forthcoming). On Defining Moral Enhancement: A Clarificatory Taxonomy. Neuroethics:1-11.
    Recently there has been some discussion concerning a particular type of enhancement, namely ‘moral enhancement’. However, there is no consensus on what precisely constitutes moral enhancement, and as a result the concept is used and defined in a wide variety of ways. In this article, we develop a clarificatory taxonomy of these definitions and we identify the criteria that are used to delineate the concept. We think that the current definitions can be distinguished from each other by the criteria used (...)
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  5. Natalie Ball & Gregor Wolbring (forthcoming). Cognitive Enhancement: Perceptions Among Parents of Children with Disabilities. Neuroethics:1-20.
    Cognitive enhancement is an increasingly discussed topic and policy suggestions have been put forward. We present here empirical data of views of parents of children with and without cognitive disabilities. Analysis of the interviews revealed six primary overarching themes: meanings of health and treatment; the role of medicine; harm; the ‘good’ parent; normality and self-perception; and ability. Interestingly none of the parents used the term ethics and only one parent used the term moral twice.
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  6. Robyn Bluhm (forthcoming). No Need for Alarm: A Critical Analysis of Greene's Dual-Process Theory of Moral Decision-Making. Neuroethics:1-18.
    Joshua Greene and his colleagues have proposed a dual-process theory of moral decision-making to account for the effects of emotional responses on our judgments about moral dilemmas that ask us to contemplate causing direct personal harm. Early formulations of the theory contrast emotional and cognitive decision-making, saying that each is the product of a separable neural system. Later formulations emphasize that emotions are also involved in cognitive processing. I argue that, given the acknowledgement that emotions inform cognitive decision-making, a single-process (...)
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  7. Lisa Bortolotti, Matthew R. Broome & Matteo Mameli (forthcoming). Delusions and Responsibility for Action: Insights From the Breivik Case. Neuroethics:1-6.
    What factors should be taken into account when attributing criminal responsibility to perpetrators of severe crimes? We discuss the Breivik case, and the considerations which led to holding Breivik accountable for his criminal acts. We put some pressure on the view that experiencing certain psychiatric symptoms or receiving a certain psychiatric diagnosis is sufficient to establish criminal insanity. We also argue that the presence of delusional beliefs, often regarded as a key factor in determining responsibility, is neither necessary nor sufficient (...)
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  8. Jeffrey G. Caron & Gordon A. Bloom (forthcoming). Ethical Issues Surrounding Concussions and Player Safety in Professional Ice Hockey. Neuroethics:1-9.
    Concussions in professional sports have received increased attention, which is partly attributable to evidence that found concussion incidence rates were much higher than previously thought (Echlin et al. Journal of Neurosurgical Focus 29:1–10, 2010). Further to this, professional hockey players articulated how their concussion symptoms affected their professional careers, interpersonal relationships, and qualities of life (Caron et al. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology 35:168–179, 2013). Researchers are beginning to associate multiple/repeated concussions with Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), a structural brain (...)
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  9. Joseph P. DeMarco & Paul J. Ford (forthcoming). Neuroethics and the Ethical Parity Principle. Neuroethics:1-9.
    Neil Levy offers the most prominent moral principles that are specifically and exclusively designed to apply to neuroethics. His two closely related principles, labeled as versions of the ethical parity principle (EPP), are intended to resolve moral concerns about neurological modification and enhancement [1]. Though EPP is appealing and potentially illuminating, we reject the first version and substantially modify the second. Since his first principle, called EPP (strong), is dependent on the contention that the mind literally extends into external props (...)
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  10. Athina Demertzi, Eric Racine, Marie-Aurélie Bruno, Didier Ledoux, Olivia Gosseries, Audrey Vanhaudenhuyse, Marie Thonnard, Andrea Soddu, Gustave Moonen & Steven Laureys (forthcoming). Pain Perception in Disorders of Consciousness: Neuroscience, Clinical Care, and Ethics in Dialogue. Neuroethics.
  11. Cynthia Forlini, Jan Schildmann, Patrik Roser, Radim Beranek & Jochen Vollmann (forthcoming). Knowledge, Experiences and Views of German University Students Toward Neuroenhancement: An Empirical-Ethical Analysis. Neuroethics:1-10.
    Across normative and empirical disciplines, considerable attention has been devoted to the prevalence and ethics of the non-medical use of prescription and illegal stimulants for neuroenhancement among students. A predominant assumption is that neuroenhancement is prevalent, in demand, and calls for appropriate policy action. In this paper, we present data on the prevalence, views and knowledge from a large sample of German students in three different universities (n = 1,026) and analyze the findings from a moral pragmatics perspective. The results (...)
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  12. Annette Greenhow & Jocelyn East (forthcoming). Custodians of the Game: Ethical Considerations for Football Governing Bodies in Regulating Concussion Management. Neuroethics:1-18.
    Concussion in professional football is a topic that has generated a significant amount of interest for many years, partly due in recent times to the filing of the class-action litigation and the uncapped compensation injury fund and settlement involving 4,500 retired professional players and the National Football League (NFL). The proceedings claimed that the NFL, as the governing body of American football, failed in its duty to protect players’ health during their professional playing careers by exposing players to risks of (...)
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  13. Karim Jebari (forthcoming). What to Enhance: Behaviour, Emotion or Disposition? Neuroethics:1-9.
    As we learn more about the human brain, novel biotechnological means to modulate human behaviour and emotional dispositions become possible. These technologies could be used to enhance our morality. Moral bioenhancement, an instance of human enhancement, alters a person’s dispositions, emotions or behaviour in order to make that person more moral. I will argue that moral bioenhancement could be carried out in three different ways. The first strategy, well known from science fiction, is behavioural enhancement. The second strategy, favoured by (...)
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  14. Carla Meurk, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall (forthcoming). A Bio-Social and Ethical Framework for Understanding Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. Neuroethics:1-8.
    The diagnosis of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) is embedded in a matrix of biological, social and ethical processes, making it an important topic for crossdisciplinary social and ethical research. This article reviews different branches of research relevant to understanding how FASD is identified and defined and outlines a framework for future social and ethical research in this area. We outline the character of scientific research into FASD, epidemiological discrepancies between reported patterns of maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy and the (...)
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  15. C. D. Meyers (forthcoming). Neuroenhancement in Reflective Equilibrium: A Qualified Kantian Defense of Enhancing in Scholarship and Science. Neuroethics:1-12.
    Cognitive neuroenhancement (CNE) involves the use of medical interventions to improve normal cognitive functioning such as memory, focus, concentration, or willpower. In this paper I give a Kantian argument defending the use of CNE in science, scholarly research, and creative fields. Kant’s universal law formulation of the categorical imperative shows why enhancement is morally wrong in the familiar contexts of sports or competitive games. This argument, however, does not apply to the use of CNE in higher education, scholarly or scientific (...)
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  16. Brad Partridge & Wayne Hall (forthcoming). Repeated Head Injuries in Australia's Collision Sports Highlight Ethical and Evidential Gaps in Concussion Management Policies. Neuroethics:1-7.
    Head injuries (including concussion) are an inherent risk of participating in the major collision sports played in Australia (rugby league, rugby union and Australian Rules football). Protocols introduced by the governing bodies of these sports are ostensibly designed to improve player safety but do not prevent players suffering from repeated concussions. There is evidence that repeated traumatic brain injuries increase the risk of developing a number of long term problems but scientific and popular debates have largely focused on whether there (...)
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  17. Jonathan Pugh (forthcoming). Enhancing Autonomy by Reducing Impulsivity: The Case of ADHD. Neuroethics:1-3.
    In a recent article in this journal, Schaefer et al. argue that it might be possible to enhance autonomy through the use of cognitive enhancements. In this article, I highlight an example that Schaefer et al. do not acknowledge of a way in which we already seem to be using pharmacological agents in a manner that can be understood as enhancing an agent’s autonomy. To make this argument, I begin by following other theorists in the philosophical literature in claiming that (...)
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  18. Heidi M. Ravven (forthcoming). Free Will Skepticism: Current Arguments and Future Directions. Neuroethics:1-4.
    Offered here is a review of Gregg D. Caruso’s edited volume, Exploring the Illusion of Free will and Moral Responsibility [1]. Assembled here are essays by nearly all the major contributors to the philosophical free will debate on the denial and skeptical side. The volume tells us where the field currently is and also gives us a sense of how the free will debate is actually advancing toward greater understanding. Perhaps we can even discern some glimmer of hope for a (...)
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  19. Jesper Ryberg (forthcoming). Punishing Adolescents—On Immaturity and Diminished Responsibility. Neuroethics:1-10.
    Should an adolescent offender be punished more leniently than an adult offender? Many theorists believe the answer to be in the affirmative. According to the diminished culpability model, adolescents are less mature than adults and, therefore, less responsible for their wrongdoings and should consequently be punished less harshly. This article concerns the first part of the model: the relation between immaturity and diminished responsibility. It is argued that this relation faces three normative challenges which do not allow for easy answers (...)
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  20. Kelly Sorensen (forthcoming). Moral Enhancement and Self-Subversion Objections. Neuroethics:1-12.
    Some say moral bioenhancements are urgent and necessary; others say they are misguided or simply will not work. I examine a class of arguments claiming that moral bioenhancements are problematic because they are self-subverting. On this view, trying to make oneself or others more moral, at least through certain means, can itself be immoral, or at least worse than the alternatives. The thought here is that moral enhancements might fail not for biological reasons, but for specifically morally self-referential reasons. I (...)
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