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  1. Claudia Baracchi (2013). Paul Klee: Trees and the Art of Life. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):340-365.
    The artist understands his work as intimately connected with the life and symbolism of plants. Art, thus, demands an attunement to life’s elemental operations, the thrust “into dimensions far removed from the conscious process.” The first part of the present essay aims at recovering what is implied in the imagery of trees, delving into ancient archives of dormant collective memories and immemorial imaginal stratifications. The second and third parts, deploying the re-energized figure of the tree, explore the theme of the (...)
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  2. Damir Barbarić (2013). Rhythmic Movement. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):405-418.
    This article attempts a critical interpretation of Klee’s basic thoughts on the source and essence of art, based primarily on his diary entries and his lectures at the Bauhaus. The starting point of the interpretation is Klee’s fundamentally dynamic assumption of the primacy of becoming and movement vis-à-vis static being. Each work of art, for Klee, is essentially movement, although as organized and structured by rhythm. The source of the rhythmic movement he recognizes as chaos, which he defines as the (...)
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  3. Michael Baumgartner (2013). Paul Klee. From Structural Analysis and Morphogenesis to Art. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):374-393.
    This contribution illuminates the meaning of the systematic confrontation with nature in the artistic and art-theoretical thought of Paul Klee. Klee’s specific interest lay in the analysis of the morphological and structural principles of plants as well as in the study of the processes of growth and form in nature. A central element of this confrontation—which also manifested itself in nuanced ways in Klee’s teaching at the Bauhaus and in his artistic creations—is the reduction of the manifold natural world of (...)
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  4. Gottfried Boehm (2013). Genesis: Paul Klee's Temporalization of Form. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):311-330.
    In addition to his artistic work, Paul Klee was a theoretician of the highest rank. Readings of his extensive writings evidence that he was a transformer of the immemorial eidetic concept of form toward its temporalization. As a standard he uses the mobility of nature and the cosmos, to which he anchors his generative concept of form. This essay concerns a reconstruction of some of his lines of argumentation from manuscripts that were not published during his lifetime. Among those are (...)
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  5. Günter Figal (2013). To the Margins. On the Spatiality of Klee's Art. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):366-373.
    With reference mainly to Paul Klee’s Ad marginem from 1930 , this article focuses on space—namely, on the question of how space can be made visible as such. Having figures, lines, and the background establishing an intense interplay of transparency, Klee’s work refrains from displaying the mere spatiality of objects. It is this interplay of transparent figures entangled with their background that are withdrawing but not disappearing that creates an empty space that is as such limited and unoccupied. Compared to (...)
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  6. Galen A. Johnson (2013). On the Origin(s) of Truth in Art: Merleau-Ponty, Klee, and Cézanne. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):475-515.
    Beginning from Klee’s statement on truth in self-portraiture that his faces are truer than real ones and Cézanne’s promise to tell us the truth in painting, we consider the origins of truth in art for the philosophy of Merleau-Ponty. We discover that truth in perception, in life, and incarnate existence, as in art, originates from bodily movement. Similar to Heidegger’s argument in “The Origin of the Work of Art,” a truth happens between the work and painter, between the work and (...)
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  7. David Farrell Krell (2013). The Way Back Down: Paul Klee's Heights and Depths. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):331-339.
    The present essay offers a brief commentary on Paul Klee’s The Tightrope Walker. Klee’s painting is brought into connection with Nietzsche’s famous figure of the Seiltänzer in the prologue to Thus Spoke Zarathustra and to the recent film, Man on Wire. The general context of the essay, “descensional reflection,” is inspired by Heidegger’s remark that thinking in our time is “on the descent” from metaphysics.
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  8. María del Rosario Acosta López (2013). Tragic Representation: Paul Klee on Tragedy and Art. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):443-461.
    This paper traces and examines the different connotations given to the notion of “tragedy” in Paul Klee’s thought. From his early reflections on, Klee relates this notion to an intermediate and conflictive condition that characterizes human existence—an existence that takes place between heaven and earth, between the ethereal and the earthly. This essay focuses on how the connotations Klee gives to tragedy in different moments of his reflections transform the way he conceives the work of art. Hence, I will attempt (...)
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  9. Dennis J. Schmidt (2013). Klee's Gardens. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):394-404.
    The image and the idea of the garden play a prominent role in both Klee’s paintings and in his theoretical work. The purpose of this paper is to ask about the significance of gardens for Klee. In the end, I argue that the garden provides an image of growth and of place that opens possibilities for understanding the human place in the world.
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  10. Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback (2013). In-Between Painting and Music—or, Thinking with Paul Klee and Anton Webern. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):419-442.
    The present article discusses the relation between painting and music in the work by Paul Klee, bringing it into conversation with the music by Anton Webern. It assumes, as a starting point, that the main question is not about relating painting and music but rather about the relation between moving towards painting and moving towards music, hence the relation between forming forces and not between formed forms. Since for Klee the musical structure of the pictorial is understood as “active linear (...)
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  11. Alejandro A. Vallega (2013). Paul Klee's Originary Painting. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):462-474.
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  12. Joe Balay (2013). The Convalescence of Language: James Risser. The Life of Understanding: A Contemporary Hermeneutics. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2012. Viii+ 142 Pp. Bibliography and Index. [REVIEW] Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):267-273.
     
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  13. Joe Balay (2013). The Convalescence of Language. Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):267-273.
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  14. Claudia Baracchi (2013). The Syntax of Life: Gregory Bateson and the “Platonic View”. Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):204-219.
    The essay follows the fil rouge of ancient Greek thinking in the work of Gregory Bateson, an unusually multi-faceted and energetically nomadic intellect in the landscape of twentieth-century hyper-specialized disciplines, whose eclectic research focused on the question of life and of human participation in a living world. Through the reverberation of Neoplatonic motifs and echoing pre-Socratic intuitions, Bateson reflects on the “pattern which connects”—the λόγος that says one and all things, and the interpenetration of one and all things, thus operating (...)
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  15. Renaud Barbaras (2013). The Subject's Life and the Life of Manifestation: Towards a Privative Biology. Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):161-176.
    The universal a priori of the correlation between transcendental being and its subjective modes of givenness constitutes the minimal framework for any phenomenological approach. The proper object of phenomenology is then to characterize both the exact nature of the correlation and the sense of being of the terms in relation, that is to say, of subject and world. It involves demonstrating that a rigorous analysis of the correlation unfolds necessarily on three levels and that phenomenology is thus destined to move (...)
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  16. Jon K. Burmeister (2013). Hegel's Living Logic. Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):243-264.
    For Hegel, logic does not essentially consist of formal categories used to think about non-logical content. Rather, it consists of formal categories which are also themselves the content of logic. The idea that logic is its own form and its own content means that forms are used to think through other forms such that the same logical determination is a form in one context and a content in another. The generation of form and content out of one another—which precludes the (...)
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  17. Steven DeCaroli (2013). Political Life: Giorgio Agamben and the Idea of Authority. Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):220-242.
    This article explores the relation between biological life and political life, placing it in the context of the ancient Greek distinction between the life of the home (the oikos) and the realm of politics (the polis). In contrast with the oikos, the life of the polis was characterized by attempts to exclude from its sphere both the constraints of necessity that oblige human action to conform to the exigencies of survival as well as the violence that accompanies this pursuit. Although (...)
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  18. Wayne J. Froman (2013). To Renew the Impulse. Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):297-307.
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  19. David Farrell Krell (2013). Following Afterness: Gerhard Richter. Afterness: Figures of Following in Modern Thought and Aesthetics. New York: Columbia University Press, 2011. 245 Pp. [REVIEW] Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):274-296.
     
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  20. David Farrell Krell (2013). Following Afterness. Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):274-296.
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  21. William McNeill (2013). The Secret of Life: Explorations of Nietzsche's Conception of Life as Will to Power. Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):177-192.
    The essay presents a series of explorations of Nietzsche’s conception of life as will to power, relying extensively on fragments from Nietzsche’s later notebooks, but also commenting on key selections from Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Beyond Good and Evil, and On the Genealogy of Morality. I argue that Nietzsche understands himself to be engaged in a unique kind of phenomenology of the body, and that will to power, as the primal force of life, should be understood not only as a creative (...)
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  22. Dennis J. Schmidt (2013). Keeping Pace with the Movement of Life: On Words and Music. Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):193-203.
    The largest purpose of this paper is to ask about how it is that life is re-presented by us. The argument is that life should be considered as a matter not of a collection of objects, but of a movement, of time. Furthermore, the claim is that the conceptual language of philosophy has the liability of ossifying this movement of life but that music, which is time and movement above all, is able to keep pace with this movement of life.
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  23. Peg Birmingham (2013). Natal Finitude: Syncopated Temporality and the Endurance of the New. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):141-148.
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  24. Penelope Deutscher (2013). Auto-Immunity, Sexual Violence, and Reproduction: Response to Michael Naas, Miracle and Machine. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):108-117.
  25. Rodolphe Gasché (2013). In Love of Life: Michael Naas' Miracle and Machine. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):73-91.
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  26. Martin Hägglund (2013). Beyond the Performative and the Constative. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):100-107.
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  27. Sarah Hammerschlag (2013). On Monstrous Shoulders: Literature, Fraud, and Faith in Derrida. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):92-99.
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  28. Niall Keane (2013). The Silence of the Origin: Philosophy in Transition and the Essence of Thinking. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):27-48.
    This article pursues Heidegger’s protracted engagement with the question of silent origins. First, I explore the so-called transitional thinking grounded in the fundamental attunement of reticence as it is put forward in the Beiträge zur Philosophie. Second, I consider the complex matter of Heidegger’s reference to the intimate, yet distinct, roles of poetry and thinking when it comes to articulating a response to the attunement of reticence. I then move to explain what is at stake in Heidegger’s engagement with Hölderlin (...)
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  29. Darian Meacham (2013). Brill Online Books and Journals. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1).
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  30. Darian Meacham (2013). What Goes Without Saying: Husserl's Concept of Style. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):3-26.
    The idea of “style” emerges at several important points throughout Husserl’s oeuvre: in the second part of the Crisis of the European Sciences, the lectures on intersubjectivity published in Husserliana XV, and in the analyses of transcendental character and intersubjectivity in the second book of the Ideas. This paper argues that the idea of style, often overlooked, is in fact central to understanding Husserl’s conception of the person and intersubjective relations, its role in the latter captured in his odd turn (...)
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  31. Michael Naas (2013). The Promise of Other Voices: Response to Sarah Hammerschlag, Martin Hägglund, Penelope Deutscher, and Rodolphe Gasché. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):118-137.
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  32. Jeffrey Powell (2013). Language, Writing, and Truth. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):149-157.
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  33. Michael Schreyach (2013). Pre-Objective Depth in Merleau-Ponty and Jackson Pollock. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):49-70.
    Pollock’s drip technique generated certain unconventional representational possibilities, including the possibility of expressing the pre-reflective involvement of an embodied, intentional subject in a perceptual world. Consequently, Pollock’s art can be understood to explore or investigate the pre-objective conditions of reflective and intellectual consciousness. His painting—here I consider Number 1, 1949—motivates viewers to consider the relationship between intention and meaning as it appears in both primordial and reflective dimensions of experience. The account proceeds in three stages. First, I review key features (...)
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