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  1. Alain Beauclair (2014). Speaking of Other Animals. Research in Phenomenology 44 (1):76-106.
    Commonly ignored on the issue, Hans-Georg Gadamer’s contribution to the question of other animals is analyzed in this paper. Focusing on Gadamer’s phenomenological account of language and drawing from his Aristotelian and Heideggerian roots, I argue that Gadamer draws a path toward a novel reconsideration of the difference between the living and human essences, a reconsideration that brings us to the limits of λόγος and resolves itself in the ontological concept of play.
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  2. Steven Crowell (2014). Günter Figal’s Objectivity: From Transcendental to Hermeneutical Phenomenology. Research in Phenomenology 44 (1):121-134.
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  3. Daniel Dahlstrom (2014). Günter Figal’s Objectivity: Some Critical Remarks. Research in Phenomenology 44 (1):111-120.
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  4. Carmine Di Martino (2014). Husserl and the Question of Animality. Research in Phenomenology 44 (1):50-75.
    Is it possible to speak of a Husserlian phenomenology of the animal? In his phenomenological analyses, Husserl thematizes animals as a case of “abnormality” in order to investigate the subjectivity that constitutes the human world as a normal world. With respect to other perspectives—such as the Heideggerian one—which imply a drastic separation from animality, Husserl’s standpoint has the advantage of keeping a path of communication open between the phenomenological and the scientific investigation of the problem, in the multifarious forms taken (...)
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  5. Günter Figal (2014). Response to Steven G. Crowell and Daniel O. Dahlstrom. Research in Phenomenology 44 (1):135-141.
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  6. Theodore George (2014). Introduction. Research in Phenomenology 44 (1):107-110.
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  7. Michael Naas (2014). “World, Solitude, Finitude”: Derrida’s Final Seminar. Research in Phenomenology 44 (1):1-27.
    In his final seminar, The Beast and the Sovereign, vol. 2 , Jacques Derrida spends the entire year reading just two texts, Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and Martin Heidegger’s Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics. This essay looks in detail at Derrida’s treatment of this latter and, in particular, at Derrida’s emphasis on the Heideggerian notion of Walten in this work. The essay begins by considering several of Derrida’s prior engagements with Heidegger, especially in Of Spirit and the “Geschlecht” essays, and their (...)
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  8. Andrea Staiti (2014). Reactivating Husserl’s Crisis. Research in Phenomenology 44 (1):152-159.
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  9. Daniela Vallega-neu (2014). Inventing Heidegger’s Fluid Ontology. Research in Phenomenology 44 (1):143-151.
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  10. Krzysztof Ziarek (2014). The Modern Privilege of Life. Research in Phenomenology 44 (1):28-49.
    This essay reconsiders the notion of “world” by looking critically at the idiom of life dominating current critical debates. Showing how and why life should be displaced from the privileged position it has assumed in modernity, it examines Arendt’s and Heidegger’s comments on the world. In The Human Condition, Arendt provides an interesting philosophical and cultural account of the rise of life to prominence in the modern age, pointing out its detrimental effects on the understanding of the world and human (...)
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  11. Tobias Keiling (2014). What Phenomenology Ought to Be. Research in Phenomenology:281-300.
    Steven Crowell’s rich book is an eminent advance in the interpretation of Husserl and Heidegger, in thinking about the nature of phenomenology as a way of philosophical inquiry, and in accessing the contribution phenomenology can make to philosophy in general. Just as its predecessor Husserl, Heidegger, and the Space of Meaning (2001) has not stood uncontested—the review by Taylor Carman, for instance, is very critical—Crowell’s new book on normativity is also likely to spur debate. But such debate should be most (...)
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