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Forthcoming articles
  1.  4
    Eli Franco (forthcoming). Final Notes on the Sadvitīyaprayoga. Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (2):1-11.
    The following response first points out the obvious methodological disadvantages of Oetke’s decline to use both primary and secondary sources for his interpretation of the sadvitīyaprayoga. Oetke believes that he is able to provide an “objectively adequate” presentation of the sp and describe “the objective properties” of its content without taking the historical context into account. By divorcing meaning from context, he distorts the presumed original meaning and intention of the sp, and superimposes on it an anachronistic concern with what (...)
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  2.  11
    Nirmalya Guha (forthcoming). On Arthāpatti. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-20.
    Arthāpatti does not depend on observation of pervasion or background belief. It is certain in the sense that when S cognizes P through postulation, no other epistemic instrument would invalidate P. The Naiyāyika tries to reduce postulation to anumāna and/or tarka. I shall argue that it is neither. Due to its explanatory role, one may think that postulation plays an essential role in lakṣaṇā or indication. But this too is a misconception. Both tarka and lakṣaṇā depend on observation and background (...)
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  3.  1
    Kyungrae Kim (forthcoming). Avīci Hell and Wújiān in the Cognitive Process: Observations on Some Technical Terms in the Jié Tuō Dào Lùn. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-18.
    The text Jié tuō dào lùn, or Chinese translation of *Vimuttimagga mentions the Avīci Hell all of a sudden in the section on the cognitive process. The problematic phrase wújiān shēng Āpídìyù has been interpreted in different ways by several scholars. Japanese scholars tend to skip the phrase, or regard the term Āpídìyù as a typographic error. Given that we do not have an original text, however, the phrase needs to be understood as it is. In contrast, the English translation (...)
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  4.  2
    Catherine Prueitt (forthcoming). Shifting Concepts: The Realignment of Dharmakīrti on Concepts and the Error of Subject/Object Duality in Pratyabhijñā Śaiva Thought. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-27.
    Contemporary scholars have begun to document the extensive influence of the sixth to seventh century Buddhist philosopher Dharmakīrti on Pratyabhijñā Śaiva thought. Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta’s adaptation of Dharmakīrti’s apoha theory provides a striking instance of the creative ways in which these Śaivas use Dharmakīrti’s ideas to argue for positions that Dharmakīrti would emphatically reject. Both Dharmakīrti and these Śaivas emphasize that the formation of a concept involves both objective and subjective factors. Working within a certain perceptual environment, factors such as (...)
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  5.  6
    Diwakar Acharya (forthcoming). ‘This World, in the Beginning, Was Phenomenally Non-Existent’: Āruṇi’s Discourse on Cosmogony in Chāndogya Upaniṣad VI.1–VI.7. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-32.
    This paper critically reads and analyzes the first discourse of Āruṇi and Śvetaketu in the first half of the sixth chapter of the Chāndogya Upaniṣad. It argues that, except for a few interpolated lines in VI.2 and VI.3, the entire discourse constitutes one integrated whole with a specific indicatory knowledge at its core that indicates deeper truth underlying all realities, and its characterization and twofold elaboration with reference to macro- and microcosmos. In light of two cosmogonic accounts from the Jaiminīya (...)
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  6.  2
    James B. Apple (forthcoming). ‘An Early Bka’-Gdams-Pa Madhyamaka Work Attributed to Atiśa Dīpaṃkaraśrījñāna. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-107.
    Although Atiśa is famous for his journey to Tibet and his teaching there, his teachings of Madhyamaka are not extensively commented upon in the works of known and extant indigenous Tibetan scholars. Atiśa’s Madhyamaka thought, if even discussed, is minimally acknowledged in recent modern scholarly overviews or sourcebooks on Indian Buddhist thought. The following annotated translation provides a late eleventh century Indo-Tibetan Madhyamaka teaching on the two realities attributed to Atiśa Dīpaṃkaraśrījñāna entitled A General Explanation of, and Framework for Understanding, (...)
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  7.  1
    Greg Bailey (forthcoming). On the Distribution, Use and Meaning of the Dhātu √Vṛt in the Mokṣadharmaparvan and the Śāntiparvan of the Mahābhārata. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-22.
    Given the importance of pravṛtti and nivṛtti as shaping ideologies in the Mahābhārata and a host of other Indic texts, a study of the occurrence of the uses of √vṛt in the widest possible sense is a desideratum for an understanding of both the Mahābhārata and its Mokṣadharmaparvan. The present contribution discusses concentrations of occurrences of √vṛt-words in particular passages and considers whether these are associated with the communication of specific doctrines. Both nominal and verbal forms of √vṛt, prefixed and (...)
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  8.  2
    Piotr Balcerowicz (forthcoming). Siddhasena Mahāmati and Akalaṅka Bhaṭṭa: A Revolution in Jaina Epistemology. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-47.
    Two eight-century Jaina contemporaries, a Śvetāmbara philosopher Siddhasena Mahāmati and a Digambara Akalaṅka Bhaṭṭa revolutionised Jaina epistemology, by radically transforming basic epistemological concepts, which had been based on canonical tradition. The paper presents a brief historical outline of the developments of basic epistemological concepts in Jaina philolosophy such as the cognitive criterion and logical faculties as well as their fourteen typological models which serve as the backdrop of important innovations in epistemology introduced by Siddhasena, Pātrasvāmin and Akalaṅka. An important contribution (...)
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  9. David Brick (forthcoming). The Incorporation of Devotional Theism Into Purāṇic Gifting Rites. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-15.
    The Purāṇas make a major contribution to Brahmanical writing on gifting, primarily because they contain descriptions of numerous specific gifting rites that texts of other genres generally fail to discuss. Although largely unstudied, these Purāṇic gifting rites provide unique evidence of a historically significant, yet hitherto ignored, development in gifting in medieval India, namely, the incorporation of the increasingly popular ethos of bhakti into the much older practice of dāna, wherein gods traditionally played no prominent role. This article will argue (...)
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  10.  4
    Johannes Bronkhorst (forthcoming). The Mahābhārata and the Revival of Brahmanism. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-11.
    There are good reasons to think that Brahmanism initially belonged to a geographically limited area, with its heartland in the middle and western parts of the Gangetic plain. It was in this region that Brahmanism was at that time the culture of a largely hereditary class of priests, the brahmins, who derived their livelihood and special position in society from their close association with the local rulers. This situation changed. The most plausible hypothesis as to the reasons of this change (...)
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  11. Thom Brooks (forthcoming). Better Luck Next Time: A Comparative Analysis of Socrates and Mahayana Buddhism on Reincarnation. Journal of Indian Philosophy.
     
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  12.  2
    Yoke Meei Choong (forthcoming). The Prajñāpāramitā in Relation to the Three Samādhis. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-30.
    The idea that insight is by nature incompatible with concentration has been a long-term focus of scholarly discussion regarding the interpretation of some sūtra passages that could suggest the occurrence of insight within concentration. In the Prajñāpāramitā literature, the set of three samādhis is identified with insight, the prajñāpāramitā. Some scholars identify the experience of emptiness in these samādhis with a state of concentration, very likely the absorption of extinction. I highlight elsewhere a passage in the Prajñāpāramitā in which preceding (...)
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  13.  2
    Kate Crosby (forthcoming). Uddis and Åcikh. The Inclusion of the Sikkhåpada in the Pabbajjå Liturgy According to the Samantapåsådika. Journal of Indian Philosophy.
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  14.  4
    Giuseppe Ferraro (forthcoming). Realistic-Antimetaphysical Reading Vs Any Nihilistic Interpretation of Madhyamaka. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-26.
    This paper supports the thesis that nihilistic interpretations of Madhyamaka philosophy derive from generally antirealistic and/or metaphysical approaches to Nāgārjuna’s thought. However, the arguments and many images by way of which the author of the Mūlamadhyamakakārikā and his Indian commentators defend themselves from the charge of nihilism show limits in these approaches, and rather confirm that Nāgārjuna’s philosophy should be read as a theoretical proposal that is at once realistic and antimetaphysical. The epistemology inherent to the soteriological dimension of the (...)
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  15. Giuseppe Ferraro (forthcoming). Realistic-Antimetaphysical Reading Vs Any. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-26.
    This paper supports the thesis that nihilistic interpretations of Madhyamaka philosophy derive from generally antirealistic and/or metaphysical approaches to Nāgārjuna’s thought. However, the arguments and many images by way of which the author of the Mūlamadhyamakakārikā and his Indian commentators defend themselves from the charge of nihilism show limits in these approaches, and rather confirm that Nāgārjuna’s philosophy should be read as a theoretical proposal that is at once realistic and antimetaphysical. The epistemology inherent to the soteriological dimension of the (...)
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  16.  4
    Itsuki Hayashi (forthcoming). Can Flux Bring About Flux? An Appraisal of the Buddhist Momentarist’s Response to the Causal Objection. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-23.
    The doctrine of radical impermanence expresses the temporal dimension of Buddhist metaphysics, especially in the philosophy of Dharmakīrti and his successors. Most straightforwardly, the doctrine says that everything that exists is momentary; we are not impermanent in the sense that we perish eventually, say when our brain ceases functioning, but rather we perish immediately upon conception. The person who begins to write this sentence and the person who completes it are, strictly speaking, different entities. However, there is a devastating problem (...)
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  17.  1
    Alf Hiltebeitel (forthcoming). Mokṣa and Dharma. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-18.
    This essay asks what the terms mokṣa and dharma mean in the anomalous and apparently Mahābhārata-coined compound mokṣadharma, which provides the title for the Śāntiparvan’s third and most philosophical anthology; and it further asks what that title itself means. Its route to answering those questions is to look at the last four units of the Mokṣadharmaparvan and their three topics—the story of Śuka, the Nārāyaṇīya, and a gleaner’s subtale—as marking an “artful curvature” that shapes the outcome of King Yudhiṣṭhira’s philosophical (...)
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  18.  3
    Pascale Hugon (forthcoming). Phya Pa Chos Kyi Seng Ge and His Successors on the Classification of Arguments by Consequence Based on the Type of the Logical Reason. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-56.
    The Tibetan Buddhist logician Phya pa Chos kyi seng ge devoted a large part of his discussion on argumentation to arguments by consequence. Phya pa distinguishes in his analysis arguments by consequence that merely refute the opponent and arguments by consequence that qualify as probative. The latter induce a correct direct proof which corresponds to the reverse form of the argument by consequence. This paper deals with Phya pa’s classification of probative consequences based on the type of the logical reason (...)
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  19.  2
    Kei Kataoka (forthcoming). Horns in Dignāga’s Theory of Apoha. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-16.
    According to Dignāga, the word “cow” makes one understand all cows in a general form by excluding non-cows. However, how does one understand the non-cows to be excluded? Hattori answers as follows: “On perceiving the particular which is endowed with dewlap, horns, a hump on the back, and so forth, one understands that it is not a non-cow, because one knows that a non-cow is not endowed with these attributes.” Hattori regards observation of a dewlap, etc. as the cause of (...)
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  20.  1
    Angelika Malinar (forthcoming). Philosophy in the Mahābhārata and the History of Indian Philosophy. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-21.
    The study of philosophical terms and doctrines in the Mahābhārata touches not only on important aspects of the contents, composition and the historical contexts of the epic, but also on the historiography of Indian philosophy. General ideas about the textual history of the epic and the distinction between “didactic” and “narrative” parts have influenced the study of epic philosophy no less than academic discussions about what is philosophy in India and how it developed. This results in different evaluations of the (...)
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  21.  1
    Artur Przybyslawski (forthcoming). Cognizable Object in Tshad Ma Rigs Gter According to Go Rams Pa. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-35.
    The article presents Go rams pa’s interpretation and classification of cognizable object as explained by Sa skya Paṇḍita in his famous Tshad ma rigs gter. The text consists of introduction to the translation of the original, translation of Go ram pa’s commentary to the first chapter of Tshad ma rigs gter, edition of the original, and outline of the Tibetan text.
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  22. Isabelle Ratié (forthcoming). In Search of Utpaladeva’s Lost Vivṛti on the Pratyabhijñā Treatise: A Report on the Latest Discoveries. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-27.
    The Īśvarapratyabhijñā treatise—an important philosophical text composed in Kashmir in the 10th century CE by the Śaiva nondualist Utpaladeva—remains partly unavailable to date: a crucial component of this work, namely the detailed commentary in which Utpaladeva explained his own verses, is considered as almost entirely lost, since only a small part of it has been preserved in a single, very incomplete manuscript remarkably edited and translated by Raffaele Torella. However, our knowledge of the Vivṛti is quickly expanding: many additional fragments (...)
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  23.  1
    Peter Schreiner (forthcoming). Karman-Theory in the Mahābhārata Prolegomena to an Inquiry Into the Culture and the Condition of Philosophical Reflection About Human Life and the Requirements of Liberation. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-17.
    After delimiting the topic by reflecting on the heuristic function of the concept of “theory” in “Delimiting the Topic” section, the paper considers the literary aspects of karman-theory in the Mahābhārata in “Literary Characteristics” section. “Axioms, Theorems, Domains” section then lists the elements or axioms that fall under the umbrella term “karman-theory.” Next, dealing with contexts and collocations, “Contexts, Collocations” section combines the consideration of literary and theoretical aspects of the matter. “Historical Perspective” section then argues for the inclusion of (...)
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  24.  4
    Robert H. Sharf (forthcoming). Is Yogācāra Phenomenology? Some Evidence From the Cheng Weishi Lun. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-31.
    There have been several attempts of late to read Yogācāra through the lens of Western phenomenology. I approach the issue through a reading of the Cheng weishi lun, a seventh-century Chinese compilation that preserves the voices of multiple Indian commentators on Vasubandhu’s Triṃśikāvijñaptikārikā. Specifically, I focus on the “five omnipresent mental factors” and the “four aspects” of cognition. These two topics seem ripe, at least on the surface, for phenomenological analysis, particularly as the latter topic includes a discussion of “self-awareness”. (...)
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  25.  1
    Roy Tzohar (forthcoming). Does Early Yogācāra Have a Theory of Meaning? Sthiramati’s Arguments on Metaphor in the Triṃśikā-Bhāṣya. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-22.
    Can the early Yogācāra be said to present a systematic theory of meaning? The paper argues that Sthiramati’s bhāṣya on Vasubandhu’s Triṃśikā, in which he argues that all language-use is metaphorical, indeed amounts to such a theory, both because of the text’s engagement with the wider Indian philosophical conversation about reference and meaning and by virtue of the questions it addresses and its motivations. Through a translation and analysis of key sections of Sthiramati’s commentary I present the main features of (...)
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  26.  5
    Paolo Visigalli (forthcoming). The Buddha’s Wordplays: The Rhetorical Function and Efficacy of Puns and Etymologizing in the Pali Canon. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-24.
    This essay explores selected examples of puns and etymologizing in the Pali canon. It argues that they do not solely serve a satirical intent, but are sophisticated rhetorical devices, skilfully employed by the Buddha to induce a reflective awareness in the listeners and persuade them into accepting his view. Their rhetorical function and efficacy is investigated, while foregrounding a new interpretation of the Aggaññasutta.
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  27. Benjamin Wood (forthcoming). Coming to Terms with a Monk’s Seduction: Speculations on the Conduct of Sgra Tshad Pa Rin Chen Rnam Rgyal. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-28.
    This article compares two versions of a story about a Tibetan Buddhist monk, Sgra tshad pa Rin chen rnam rgyal, who engages in sexual intercourse with a laywoman. The authors of these two narratives, dating from the fifteenth and nineteenth centuries, each provide a different rationale for the monk’s behavior. In the earlier telling, Rin chen rnam rgyal is said to have “eased the suffering” of a “lust-crazed” woman, conducting himself virtuously, as a bodhisattva. In the later telling, the monk (...)
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  28.  2
    Samuel Wright (forthcoming). History in the Abstract: ‘Brahman-Ness’ and the Discipline of Nyāya in Seventeenth-Century Vārāṇasī. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-29.
    Over the last fifteen years, studies on Sanskrit intellectual history between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries have produced a body of scholarship that has fundamentally reshaped our understanding of the period. Yet, despite significant advances in the understanding of the social-historical circumstances of authors and disciplines as well as success in elucidating major features of intellectual thought, a main point of difficultly has been in combining both the intellectuality and sociality of Sanskrit scholars. By examining a debate within the discipline (...)
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  29. Ołena Łucyszyna (forthcoming). On the Notion of Linguistic Convention in the Yogasūtrabhāṣya. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-19.
    The aim of this study is to clarify the meaning of the term saṁketa, which is usually translated as ‘ convention’, in the Yogasūtrabhāṣya, the first and the most authoritative commentary to the Yogasūtras. This paper is a contribution to the reconstruction of the classical Yoga view on the relation between word and its meaning, for saṁketa is a key term used by this darśana in discussing this relation. The textual analysis of the Yogasūtrabhāṣya has led me to the conclusion (...)
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