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Forthcoming articles
  1. Giuseppe Ferraro (forthcoming). Grasping Snakes and Touching Elephants: A Rejoinder to Garfield and Siderits. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-12.
    Some time ago I advanced on the pages of this journal a critique of the interpretation given by Jay L. Garfield and Mark Siderits (hereafter GS) of Nāgārjuna’s doctrine of the two truths (Ferraro, J Indian Philos 41(2):195–219, 2013.1); to my article the two authors responded with a ‘defense of the semantic interpretation’ of the Madhyamaka doctrine of emptiness (GS, J Indian Philos 41(6):655–664, 2013). Their reply, however, could not consider my personal understanding of Nāgārjuna’s notions of śūnyatā and dve (...)
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  2. Christopher Minkowski (forthcoming). Apūrvaṃ Pāṇḍityam: On Appayya Dīkṣita's Singular Life. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-10.
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  3. Christopher Minkowski (forthcoming). Appayya's Vedānta and Nīlakaṇṭha's Vedāntakataka. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-20.
    The seventeenth century author Nīlakaṇṭha Caturdhara wrote several works criticising the Vedāntic theology of the sixteenth century author, Appayya Dīkṣita. In one of these works, the Vedāntakataka, Nīlakaṇṭha picks out two doctrines for criticism: that the liberated soul becomes the Lord (īśvarabhāvāpatti), and that souls thus liberated remain the Lord until all other souls are liberated (sarvamukti). These doctrines appear both in Appayya’s Advaitin and in his Śivādvaitin writings. They appear to be ones to which Appayya was committed. They raise (...)
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  4. Raffaele Torella (forthcoming). Notes on the Śivadṛṣṭi by Somānanda and its Commentary. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-51.
    A somewhat problematic book has recently been devoted to one of the most fascinating (and neglected) works of Kashmirian Śaiva Advaita: the Śivadṛṣṭi by Somānanda. This furnishes the occasion for further reflection on the textual transmission and interpretation of several passages of the Śivadṛṣṭi and the only extant commentary upon it, the insightful Padasaṃgati by Utpaladeva, unfortunately covering only the first three āhnikas and a part of the fourth. This important text (along with its commentary), the first philosophical presentation of (...)
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  5. Ivan Andrijanić (forthcoming). Quotations and (Lost) Commentaries in Advaita Vedānta: Some Philological Notes on Bhartṛprapañca's “Fragments”. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-20.
    The oldest preserved commentary on the Br̥hadāraṇyaka-Upaniṣad was composed by Śaṅkara. Sureśvara composed a sub-commentary on this commentary, while Ānandagiri composed commentaries both on Śaṅkara’s commentary and on Sureśvara’s sub-commentary. All these four books contain a number of passages from earlier works which are not preserved. Sureśvara and Ānandagiri attributed some of these passages to a commentator named Bhartr̥prapañca. The aim of this article is to present a philological method which will establish which of the passages might be paraphrases and (...)
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  6. Guy Axtell (forthcoming). Religious Pluralism and its Discontents. Journal of Indian Philosophy.
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  7. Cristina Bignami (forthcoming). Re-Use in the Art Field: The Iconography of Yakṣī. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-24.
    The focus of this research is the re-use of the Yakṣī image. The study of the evolution of a certain iconography induces one to face the problem of re-use in correlation to the transmission of images in time, and of their survival or transformation in historical and cultural environments different from the original ones. In fact, every different time period formulates its new iconography but above all it takes up again pre-existing images: these may be “revived” and, hence, may be (...)
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  8. Johannes Bronkhorst (forthcoming). Mīmāṃsāsūtra and Brahmasūtra. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-7.
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  9. Yigal Bronner (forthcoming). A Renaissance Man in Memory: Appayya Dīkṣita Through the Ages. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-29.
    This essay is a first attempt to trace the evolution of biographical accounts of Appayya Dīkṣita from the sixteenth century onward, with special attention to their continuities and changes. It explores what these rich materials teach us about Appayya Dīkṣita and his times, and what lessons they offer about the changing historical sensibilities in South India during the transition to the colonial and postcolonial eras. I tentatively identify two important junctures in the development of these materials: one that took place (...)
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  10. Thom Brooks (forthcoming). Better Luck Next Time: A Comparative Analysis of Socrates and Mahayana Buddhism on Reincarnation. Journal of Indian Philosophy.
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  11. Kate Crosby (forthcoming). Uddis and Åcikh. The Inclusion of the Sikkhåpada in the Pabbajjå Liturgy According to the Samantapåsådika. Journal of Indian Philosophy.
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  12. Madhav M. Deshpande (forthcoming). Appayya Dīkṣita and the Lineage of Bhaṭṭoji Dīkṣita. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-10.
    In the last few years, several scholars have attempted to analyze the historical circumstances of Bhaṭṭoji Dīkṣita and the development of his specific stances in the area of Pāṇinian grammar. This paper seeks to broaden that investigation by exploring Bhaṭṭoji Dīkṣita’s relationship to Appayya Dīkṣita. Appayya Dīkṣita’s works, such as the Madhvatantramukhamardana, were the direct source of inspiration not only for the critique of the Mādhva Vedānta that appears in Bhaṭṭoji Dīkṣita’s Tantrādhikārinirṇaya and Tattvakaustubha. They may also be seen as (...)
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  13. Payal Doctor (forthcoming). Quotations, References, and the Re-Use of Texts in the Early Nyāya Tradition. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-27.
    In this case-study, I examine examples which fall within the five categories of the re-use of texts in the Nyāya Sūtra, Nyāya Bhāṣya, and Nyāya Vārttika and note the form of quoting and embedment. It is found that the re-use of texts is prominent and that the category and method of embedding the re-used passages varies from author to author. Gautama embeds the most inter-language quotations without acknowledging his sources and Uddyotakara re-uses the most quotations and paraphrases while acknowledging his (...)
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  14. Jonathan Duquette (forthcoming). Reading Non-Dualism in Śivādvaita Vedānta: An Argument From the Śivādvaitanirṇaya in Light of the Śivārkamaṇidīpikā. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-13.
    This article examines Appaya Dīkṣita’s intellectual affiliation to Śivādvaita Vedānta in light of his well-known commitment to Advaita Vedānta. Attention will be given to his Śivādvaitanirṇaya, a short work expounding the nature of the Śivādvaita doctrine taught by Śrīkaṇṭha in his Śaiva-leaning commentary on the Brahmasūtra. It will be shown how Appaya strategically interprets Śrīkaṇṭha’s views on the relationship between Śiva (i.e., Brahman), its power of consciousness (cicchakti) and the individual self (jīva), along the lines of pure non-dualism (śuddhādvaita). In (...)
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  15. Alastair Gornall (forthcoming). How Many Sounds Are in Pāli? Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-40.
    This article highlights the central importance of Pāli phonetics in Theravāda Buddhism. In doing so, I focus on a single yet fundamental point of contention regarding the number of sounds in the Pāli language from the twelfth to fifteenth century. I argue that this debate on the number of sounds was of central concern due to the importance of Pāli pronunciation in the ritual sphere, the development of new regional monastic identities, and the introduction of regional scripts. In tracing this (...)
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  16. Birgit Kellner & Sara McClintock (forthcoming). Ākāra in Buddhist Philosophical and Soteriological Analysis: Introduction. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-6.
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  17. Birgit Kellner & Sara McClintock (forthcoming). Erratum To: Journal of Indian Philosophy, Vol. 42, No. 2‒3. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-2.
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  18. Tse-fu Kuan (forthcoming). Abhidhamma Interpretations of “Persons” (Puggala): With Particular Reference to the Aṅguttara Nikāya. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-30.
    General opinion holds that the Abhidhamma treats the Buddha’s teachings in terms of ultimate realities, i.e. dhammas, and that conventional constructs such as persons (puggala) fall outside the primary concern of the Abhidhamma. The present paper re-examines this ultimate-conventional dichotomy drawn between dhammas and persons and argues that this dichotomy does not hold true for the canonical Abhidhamma in Pali. This study explores how various types of persons are interpreted and approached by the Abhidhamma material, including Abhidhamma texts such as (...)
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  19. Malhar Kulkarni (forthcoming). Quotations in Grammatical Texts and the Tradition of Manuscript Transmission of the Kāśikāvṛtti. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-8.
    The Kāśikāvṛtti, the oldest available complete commentary on Pāṇini’s grammar, the Aṣṭādhyāyī, is found quoted often in the later pāṇinian grammatical tradition. These quotations throw light on a number of aspects of the text of the Kāśikāvṛtti. This paper focuses on how this later pāṇinian grammatical tradition views the modifications in the text of the Aṣṭādhyāyī (generally ascribed to the text of Kāśikāvṛtti by modern scholarship) and concludes that also the tradition ascribes these modifications to the Kāśikāvṛtti. Further, this paper (...)
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  20. Lawrence McCrea (forthcoming). Appayyadīkṣita's Invention of Śrīkaṇṭha's Vedānta. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-14.
    Apart from his voluminous, immensely learned, and spectacularly successful contributions to the fields of Hermeneutics (Mīmāṃsā), non-dualist Metaphysics (Advaita Vedānta), and poetics, the sixteenth century South Indian polymath Appayyadīkṣita is famed for reviving from obscurity the moribund Śaivite Vedānta tradition represented by the (thirteenth century?) Brahmasūtrabhāṣya of Śrīkaṇṭha. Appayya’s voluminous commentary on this work, his Śivārkamaṇidīpikā, not only reconstitutes Śrīkaṇṭha’s system, but radically transforms it, making it into a springboard for Appayya’s own highly original critiques of standard views of Mīmāṃsā (...)
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  21. Mattia Salvini (forthcoming). Dependent Arising, Non-Arising, and the Mind: MMK1 and the Abhidharma. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-27.
    The first Chapter of Nāgārjuna’s Mūlamadhyamakakārikā offers a critique of causation that includes the Abhidharmic category of the ‘four conditions’. Following the South-Asian commentarial tradition, this article discusses the precise relationship between Madhyamaka philosophy and its fundamental Abhidharmic background. What comes to light is a more precise assessment of Madhyamaka ideas about viable conventions, understood as the process of dependent arising. Since this is primarily in the sense of conceptual dependence, it involves sentiency as a necessary causal element, and the (...)
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  22. Mark Siderits (forthcoming). Causation, 'Humean' Causation and Emptiness. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-17.
    One strategy Mādhyamikas use to support their claim that nothing has intrinsic nature (svabhāva) is to argue that things with intrinsic nature could not enter into causal relations. But it is not clear that there is a good Madhyamaka argument against ultimate causation that understands causation in ‘Humean’ terms and understands dharmas as tropes. After exploring the rationale behind the intrinsic-nature criterion of dharma-hood, I survey the arguments Mādhyamikas actually give for their claim that anything dependently originated must be devoid (...)
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  23. Jeson Woo (forthcoming). On the Yogic Path to Enlightenment in Later Yogācāra. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-11.
    In later Yogācāra, the path to enlightenment is the course of learning the Four Noble Truths, investigating their meaning, and realizing them directly and experientially through meditative practice (bhāvanā). The object of the yogi’s enlightenment-realization is dharma and dharmin: The dharma is the true nature of real things, e.g., momentariness, while the dharmin is real things i.e., momentary things. During the practice of meditation, dharma is directly grasped in the process of clear manifestation (viśadābhā) and the particular dharmin is indirectly (...)
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  24. Li Xuezhu (forthcoming). Madhyamakāvatāra-Kārikā Chapter 6. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-30.
    The present paper provides a critical edition of basic verses of Madhyamakāvatāra chapter 6. The verses are extracted from the Sanskrit manuscript of the Madhyamakāvatārabhāṣya preserved at Potala Palace. The Madhyamakāvatāra is one of Candrakīrti’s major works and clearly establishes his own doctrinal position. Chapter 6 (about two-thirds of the entire text) contains most important doctrinal discussions of the work.
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