Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (forthcoming). Reflections on the Jābāli Episode in the Vālmīki Rāmāyaṇa. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-19.
    Jābāli, one of the priest-cum-counsellors of king Daśaratha, has long been recognized as an odd character, preaching materialism in order to persuade Rāma to go back to Ayodhyā after the death of his father. The critical edition of the Vālmīki Rāmāyaṇa reveals several stanzas interpolated in the vulgate so as to denigrate Jābāli and brand him as a rank opportunist. In spite of that, whatever remains of Jābāli’s speech addressed to Rāma evinces one of the basic tenets of materialist ontology, (...)
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  2. Christopher Minkowski (forthcoming). Apūrvaṃ Pāṇḍityam: On Appayya Dīkṣita's Singular Life. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-10.
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  3. Christopher Minkowski (forthcoming). Appayya's Vedānta and Nīlakaṇṭha's Vedāntakataka. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-20.
    The seventeenth century author Nīlakaṇṭha Caturdhara wrote several works criticising the Vedāntic theology of the sixteenth century author, Appayya Dīkṣita. In one of these works, the Vedāntakataka, Nīlakaṇṭha picks out two doctrines for criticism: that the liberated soul becomes the Lord (īśvarabhāvāpatti), and that souls thus liberated remain the Lord until all other souls are liberated (sarvamukti). These doctrines appear both in Appayya’s Advaitin and in his Śivādvaitin writings. They appear to be ones to which Appayya was committed. They raise (...)
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  4. Krishna Del Toso (forthcoming). Some Problems Concerning Textual Reuses in the Madhyamakaratnapradīpa, with a Discussion of the Quotation From Saraha's Dohākośagīti. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-47.
    The aim of the present study is to shed light on why the citation taken from Saraha’s Dohākośagīti and occurring in the Madhyamakaratnapradīpa, chapter 7, opens the door to some fundamental reflections concerning the authority and the “nature” of this latter text. On the basis of a historical and doctrinal analysis, here a new interpretation is put forward, according to which the Madhyamakaratnapradīpa should be considered a tenth century CE handbook, written by some unknown Buddhist teacher perhaps as a manual (...)
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  5. James B. Apple (forthcoming). An Early Bka’-Gdams-Pa Madhyamaka Work Attributed to Atiśa Dīpaṃkaraśrījñāna. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-107.
    Although Atiśa is famous for his journey to Tibet and his teaching there, his teachings of Madhyamaka are not extensively commented upon in the works of known and extant indigenous Tibetan scholars. Atiśa’s Madhyamaka thought, if even discussed, is minimally acknowledged in recent modern scholarly overviews or sourcebooks on Indian Buddhist thought. The following annotated translation provides a late eleventh century Indo-Tibetan Madhyamaka teaching on the two realities attributed to Atiśa Dīpaṃkaraśrījñāna entitled A General Explanation of, and Framework for Understanding, (...)
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  6. Piotr Balcerowicz (forthcoming). On the Relative Chronology of Dharmakīrti and Samantabhadra. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-47.
    In the discussions concerning the date of Dharmakīrti, Jaina sources have never been seriously taken into account. They may, however, provide a valuable insight because Dharmakīrti both criticised and was criticised by Jaina thinkers. Two Jaina authors, Samantabhadra and Pūjyapāda Devanandin, may prove crucial in determining the actual dates of Dharmakīrti. The paper argues that Dharmakīrti directly influenced Samantabhadra in a number of ways, which sets the terminus ante quem for Dharmakīrti, and his traditional chronology has to be reconsidered in (...)
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  7. Cristina Bignami (forthcoming). Re-Use in the Art Field: The Iconography of Yakṣī. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-24.
    The focus of this research is the re-use of the Yakṣī image. The study of the evolution of a certain iconography induces one to face the problem of re-use in correlation to the transmission of images in time, and of their survival or transformation in historical and cultural environments different from the original ones. In fact, every different time period formulates its new iconography but above all it takes up again pre-existing images: these may be “revived” and, hence, may be (...)
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  8. Yigal Bronner (forthcoming). A Renaissance Man in Memory: Appayya Dīkṣita Through the Ages. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-29.
    This essay is a first attempt to trace the evolution of biographical accounts of Appayya Dīkṣita from the sixteenth century onward, with special attention to their continuities and changes. It explores what these rich materials teach us about Appayya Dīkṣita and his times, and what lessons they offer about the changing historical sensibilities in South India during the transition to the colonial and postcolonial eras. I tentatively identify two important junctures in the development of these materials: one that took place (...)
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  9. Thom Brooks (forthcoming). Better Luck Next Time: A Comparative Analysis of Socrates and Mahayana Buddhism on Reincarnation. Journal of Indian Philosophy.
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  10. Kate Crosby (forthcoming). Uddis and Åcikh. The Inclusion of the Sikkhåpada in the Pabbajjå Liturgy According to the Samantapåsådika. Journal of Indian Philosophy.
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  11. Neil Dalal (forthcoming). Contemplative Grammars: Śaṅkara's Distinction of Upāsana and Nididhyāsana. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-28.
    Śaṅkara’s Advaita Vedānta is largely dismissive of ritual action, in part because the metaphysical position of non-duality erodes any independent existence of the individual as a ritual agent, and because knowledge of non-duality is thought to be independent of action. However, a close reading of Śaṅkara shows that he does accept forms of devotional practice that have remained largely marginalized in studies of Advaita Vedānta. This article compares and contrasts contemplative devotion, in the form of visualized meditations (upāsanas) on īśvara, (...)
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  12. Hugo David (forthcoming). Time, Action and Narration. On Some Exegetical Sources of Abhinavagupta's Aesthetic Theory. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-30.
    This article is an attempt at understanding the use that Abhinavagupta (950–1020?), the Kashmiri Śaiva philosopher and scholar of poetics, makes of a few concepts and theories stemming from the tradition of Vedic ritual exegesis (Pūrva-Mīmāṃsā). Its starting point is the detailed analysis of a key passage in Abhinavagupta’s commentary on the “aphorism on rasa(s)” of the Nāṭyaśāstra, where the learned commentator draws an analogy between the operation of the non-prescriptive portions of the Veda in the ritual and the “generalisation” (...)
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  13. Florinda De Simini (forthcoming). Observations on the Use of Quotations in Sanskrit Dharmanibandhas. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-24.
    This article examines some of the strategies adopted by the authors of Sanskrit law digests (Dharmanibandhas) in dealing with quotations. Given the peculiar nature of the Nibandhas, which in the majority of cases are almost exclusively made of quotations from authoritative texts (chiefly Dharmasūtras, Dharmaśāstras and Purāṇas), citations are here not only a method to support a viewpoint, but constitute the very core of the text. In order to narrow the topic, the analysis has been restricted to a sub-category of (...)
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  14. Ewa Dębicka-Borek (forthcoming). To Borrow or Not to Borrow? Some Remarks on Vaibhavīyanarasiṃhakalpa of Sātvatasaṃhitā. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-20.
    Some remarks on the possible methods of composing saṃhitās as hinted in chosen texts belonging to the Pāñcarātra school are presented in “Sect. 1”. In “Sect. 2,” the content and the structure of the Sātvatasaṃhitā and Īśvarasaṃhitā are compared. In fact, both texts are independent works even though in the light of some Pāñcarātrika texts they are considered to be mutually linked, the latter being considered a “commentary” of the former. In “Sect. 3,” the initiation (dīkṣā) as found in both (...)
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  15. Madhav M. Deshpande (forthcoming). Appayya Dīkṣita and the Lineage of Bhaṭṭoji Dīkṣita. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-10.
    In the last few years, several scholars have attempted to analyze the historical circumstances of Bhaṭṭoji Dīkṣita and the development of his specific stances in the area of Pāṇinian grammar. This paper seeks to broaden that investigation by exploring Bhaṭṭoji Dīkṣita’s relationship to Appayya Dīkṣita. Appayya Dīkṣita’s works, such as the Madhvatantramukhamardana, were the direct source of inspiration not only for the critique of the Mādhva Vedānta that appears in Bhaṭṭoji Dīkṣita’s Tantrādhikārinirṇaya and Tattvakaustubha. They may also be seen as (...)
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  16. Evgeniya Desnitskaya (forthcoming). Paśyantī, Pratibhā, Sphoţa and Jāti: Ontology and Epistemology in the Vākyapadīya. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-11.
    Eli Franco has recently suggested to distinguish the two main periods in the history of Indian philosophy, i.e. the older ontological and the new epistemological. In the Vākyapadīya, however, ontology and epistemology are evidently intertwined and interrelated. In this paper ontological and epistemological features of the concepts of paśyantī, pratibhā, sphoţa and jāti are analyzed in order to demonstrate that all these concepts, while being ontologically different, are engaged in similar epistemological processes, i.e. the cognition of a verbal utterance. Thus (...)
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  17. Jonathan Duquette (forthcoming). Reading Non-Dualism in Śivādvaita Vedānta: An Argument From the Śivādvaitanirṇaya in Light of the Śivārkamaṇidīpikā. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-13.
    This article examines Appaya Dīkṣita’s intellectual affiliation to Śivādvaita Vedānta in light of his well-known commitment to Advaita Vedānta. Attention will be given to his Śivādvaitanirṇaya, a short work expounding the nature of the Śivādvaita doctrine taught by Śrīkaṇṭha in his Śaiva-leaning commentary on the Brahmasūtra. It will be shown how Appaya strategically interprets Śrīkaṇṭha’s views on the relationship between Śiva (i.e., Brahman), its power of consciousness (cicchakti) and the individual self (jīva), along the lines of pure non-dualism (śuddhādvaita). In (...)
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  18. Eli Franco (forthcoming). Final Notes on the Sadvitīyaprayoga. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-11.
    The following response first points out the obvious methodological disadvantages of Oetke’s decline to use both primary and secondary sources for his interpretation of the sadvitīyaprayoga . Oetke believes that he is able to provide an “objectively adequate” presentation of the sp and describe “the objective properties” of its content without taking the historical context into account. By divorcing meaning from context, he distorts the presumed original meaning and intention of the sp, and superimposes on it an anachronistic concern with (...)
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  19. Stefano Gandolfo (forthcoming). The Positionless Middle Way: Weak Philosophical Deflationism in Madhyamaka. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-22.
    In this paper, I explore the connections between meta-ontological and meta-philosophical issues in two of Nāgārjuna’s primary works, the Mūlamadhyamakārikā and the Vigrahavyāvartanī. I argue for an interpretative framework that places Nāgārjuna’s Madhyamaka as a meta- and ultimately non-philosophical evaluation of philosophy. The paper’s primary argument is that an interpretative framework which makes explicit the meta-ontological and meta-philosophical links in Nāgārjuna’s thought is both viable and informative. Following Nāgārjuna, I start my analysis by looking at the positions that exist within (...)
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  20. Giuliano Giustarini (forthcoming). Liberation: The Notion of Release in the Paṭisambhidāmagga. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-26.
    The Vimokkhakathā, a section of the Paṭisambhidāmagga, expounds the longest list of vimokkhas found in Pali; it also finely elaborates on the notion of vimokkha through a crucial shift in Theravāda exegesis. In order to explore the meaning and nuances of vimokkha in the Paṭisambhidāmagga, this article focuses on its classifications and definitions, discussing their relation to the standard lists found in the Nikāyas. This examination highlights a multifaceted soteriology that supplies meditative practice with a consistent wholesome attitude; I will (...)
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  21. Nirmalya Guha (forthcoming). A Monstrous Inference Called Mahāvidyānumāna and Cantor’s Diagonal Argument. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-23.
    A mahāvidyā inference is used for establishing another inference. Its Reason is normally an omnipresent property. Its Target is defined in terms of a general feature that is satisfied by different properties in different cases. It assumes that there is no case that has the absence of its Target. The main defect of a mahāvidyā inference μ is a counterbalancing inference that can be formed by a little modification of μ. The discovery of its counterbalancing inference can invalidate such an (...)
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  22. A. Gardner Harris Jr (forthcoming). Gracious Possession, Gracious Bondage: Śiva’s Aruḷ in Māṇikkavācakar’s Tiruvācakam. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-26.
    The primary concern in this paper is to examine the nature of Śiva’s aruḷ—his generative and salvific energy—as portrayed in Tiruvācakam, Māṇikkavācakar’s important but understudied text of medieval bhakti poems. Close attention is paid to the poet’s description of Śiva’s aruḷ as inducing seemingly incongruous ontological states of being—one of ecstatic possession that results in rapturous dance and one of spiritual bondage. In doing so, this paper posits that Māṇikkavācakar is using aruḷ as śakti is used in the philosophy of (...)
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  23. Huanhuan He & Leonard W. J. Van der Kuijp (forthcoming). Once Again on the *Hetucakraḍamaru: Rotating the Wheels. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-36.
    The little versified treatise on the elements of Buddhist logic, often referred to as the Hetucakraḍamaru, is usually attributed to Dignāga. It is only available in a Tibetan translation and quotations from a few of its verses are extant in Sanskrit sources. On the basis of a novel interpretation that is based on a critical edition of the text, we argue that there is a good reason why its title was Hetucakraḍamaru - a ḍamaru is a two-headed drum. The “heads” (...)
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  24. Pascale Hugon (forthcoming). Text Re-Use in Early Tibetan Epistemological Treatises. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-39.
    This paper examines the modalities and mechanism of text-use pertaining to Indian and Tibetan material in a selection of Tibetan Buddhist epistemological treatises written between the eleventh and the thirteenth century. It pays special attention to a remarkable feature of this corpus: the phenomenon of “repeat,” that is, the unacknowledged integration of earlier material by an author within his own composition. This feature reveals an intellectual continuity in the tradition, and is found even for authors who claim a rupture from (...)
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  25. Kei Kataoka (forthcoming). Dignāga, Kumārila and Dharmakīrti on the Potential Problem of Pramāṇa and Phala Having Different Objects. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-11.
    Following Dharmakīrti’s interpretation, PS I 9ab has been understood as stating a view common to both Sautrāntikas and Yogācāras, i.e. a view that self-awareness is the result of a means of valid cognition . It has also been understood that Dignāga accepts two different views attributed to Sautrāntikas with regard to pramāṇaphala: in PS ad I 8cd he regards the cognition of an external object as the result; in PS ad I 9ab–cd he alternatively presents another view that self-awareness is (...)
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  26. Petra Kieffer-Pülz (forthcoming). Quotatives Indicating Quotations in Pāli Commentarial Literature, I Iti/Ti and Quotatives with Vuttaṃ. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-26.
    This article deals with quotatives–overt marks that indicate quotations–consisting in iti/ti or containing vuttaṃ which are used in Pāli commentarial literature to signal the occurrence of a quotation. We distinguish two types, namely, “general quotatives” and “individual quotatives”. The former are universally valid. They are widely acknowledged and used in various text corpora over several centuries. The latter are defined by an author solely for usage in his commentary. In the first part of our contribution we describe the implications connected (...)
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  27. James Kimball (forthcoming). The Relationship Between the Bhāvas and the Pratyayasarga in Classical Sāṃkhya. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-19.
    The relationship between the two classical Sāṃkhya paradigms of the conditions and the intellectual creation has been a matter of debate since the early days of modern Indology. The precise role of each of these paradigms in the broader Sāṃkhya system, as well as the relationship between them, is unclear from the text of Īśvarakṛṣṇa’s Sāṃ khyakārikā, and most of the classical commentaries on this text offer little clarification. Of these commentaries, the anonymous Yuktidīpikā provides the most detailed and extensive (...)
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  28. Lawrence McCrea (forthcoming). Appayyadīkṣita's Invention of Śrīkaṇṭha's Vedānta. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-14.
    Apart from his voluminous, immensely learned, and spectacularly successful contributions to the fields of Hermeneutics (Mīmāṃsā), non-dualist Metaphysics (Advaita Vedānta), and poetics, the sixteenth century South Indian polymath Appayyadīkṣita is famed for reviving from obscurity the moribund Śaivite Vedānta tradition represented by the (thirteenth century?) Brahmasūtrabhāṣya of Śrīkaṇṭha. Appayya’s voluminous commentary on this work, his Śivārkamaṇidīpikā, not only reconstitutes Śrīkaṇṭha’s system, but radically transforms it, making it into a springboard for Appayya’s own highly original critiques of standard views of Mīmāṃsā (...)
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  29. Walter Menezes (forthcoming). Is Viveka a Unique Pramāṇa in the Vivekacūḍāmaṇi? Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-23.
    This is an enquiry based on the Vivekacūḍāmaṇi (VC), the primary focus of which is to present viveka (discrimination) along with its three catalysts, namely, śruti, tarka, and anubhava as the unique pramāṇa of Ultimate Knowledge. This paper discusses the significance of the six popular pramāṇas of Advaita Vedānta (AV) and reiterates that as far as AV is concerned epistemologically those pramāṇas have merely a provisional value (vyāvahārika). In accordance with the purport of VC this paper argues that śruti and (...)
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  30. Elena Mucciarelli (forthcoming). Quotations in Vedic Literature: Is the Changing of a Mantra a Stylistic Device or the Degeneration of a “Beautiful Mind? Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-21.
    Many stanzas of the Ṛgvedasaṃhitā are re-used in the liturgical literature, that is, mainly in the Saṃhitās of the Yajurveda and in the Brāhmaṇas. Most of them are quoted precisely and they are apportioned in each different rite; yet, there are quite a few cases in which some variations have been adopted and the material of the sourcetext has been manipulated. As to the cultural development that resulted in such a use of the hymns, one of the most intriguing question (...)
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  31. Chiara Neri (forthcoming). The Case of the Sārasaṅgaha: Reflections on the Reuse of Texts in Medieval Sinhalese Pāli Literature. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-54.
    The Sārasaṅgaha is a Pāli text of XIIth–XIIIth century by the Sinhalese monk Siddhattha Thera. Its themes include the aspiration to become a Buddha, shrines, meditation, theories on rain, wind, gender and more. The main body consists of citations from the Nikāyas, the Jātakas, the Visuddhimagga and above all, from commentarial literature. By analysing the way the Sārasaṅgaha refers to and establishes a dialogue with the quoted works, this paper promotes a new assessment of the cultural and textual tendencies that (...)
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  32. Claus Oetke (forthcoming). Additional Notes on the Sadvitīyaprayoga. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-17.
    The present paper defends a position advanced in Oetke ) to the effect that a piece of reasoning allegedly advocated by proponents of Indian Materialism does not deserve to be dismissed as a sophism but embodies a significant philosophical criticism. In addition the article argues for the contention that for this type of theoretical assessment consideration of history of reception possesses at best a limited relevance and is even apt to impede the attainment of an adequate evaluation of the matter.
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  33. Andrew Ollett (forthcoming). Ritual Texts and Literary Texts in Abhinavagupta’s Aesthetics: Notes on the Beginning of the ‘Critical Reconstruction. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-15.
    In a recent paper in this Journal Hugo David discussed the possible sources for the comparison that Abhinavagupta draws between ritual and literary discourse at the beginning of his “critical reconstruction” of the theory of rasa in the sixth chapter of his New Dramatic Art. The question of Abhinavagupta’s sources raises more general questions about Abhinavagupta’s use of the concepts and analytical procedures of Mīmāṃsā in his literary-theoretical works. What, if anything, does Mīmāṃsā really have to do with the analysis (...)
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  34. Gianni Pellegrini (forthcoming). On the Alleged Indebtedness of the Vedānta Paribhāṣā Towards the Vedānta Kaumudī: Some Considerations on an Almost Forgotten Vivaraṇa Text. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-21.
    Dharmarāja Adhvarin’s Vedānta Paribhāṣā is a well-known introduction to Advaita Vedānta, targeted to beginners who are already trained in Navya Nyāya. According to Dasgupta , the VP is so heavily indebted to Rāmādvaya’s Vedānta Kaumudī , which was composed in the middle of the 14th century and is today almost forgotten, that the VP’s “claim to originality vanishes”. The VK was, however, only edited in 1955 and then again in 1973. In the light of this improved textual basis, what is (...)
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  35. Artur Przybyslawski (forthcoming). States of Non-Cognizing Mind in Tshad Ma Rigs Gter According to Go Rams Pa. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-18.
    The article presents Go rams pa’s interpretation of states of noncognizing mind explained by Sa skya Paṇḍita in his famous Tshad ma rigs gter. The text consists of translation of Go ram pa’s commentary to the second chapter of Tshad ma rigs gter, outline of the Tibetan text and introduction to the translation and edition of the original.
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  36. Ajay K. Rao (forthcoming). The Vaiṣṇava Writings of a Śaiva Intellectual. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-25.
    Although today Appayya Dīkṣīta enjoys a reputation as the preeminent Śaiva polemicist of the sixteenth century, it must be remembered that he also wrote works from a distinctively Vaiṣṇava perspective, in which Viṣṇu is extolled as the paramount god rather than Śiva. This paper examines one of those works, the Varadarājastava and its autocommentary. It places special emphasis on how the poem is patterned on the Varadarājapañcāśat of the fourteenth-century Śrīvaiṣṇava poet and philosopher, Vedānta Deśika, with close attention to the (...)
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  37. Ulrike Roesler (forthcoming). “As It is Said in a Sutra”: Freedom and Variation in Quotations From the Buddhist Scriptures in Early Bka'-Gdams-Pa Literature. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-18.
    The phyi dar or ‛later dissemination’ of Buddhism in Tibet is known to be a crucial formative period of Tibetan Buddhism; yet, many questions still wait to be answered: How did Tibetan Buddhist teachers of this time approach the Buddhist scriptures? Did they quote from books or from memory? Did they study Buddhism through original Sūtras or exegetical literature? To what degree was the text of the scriptures fixed and standardised before the Bka’ ’gyur and the Bstan ’gyur were compiled? (...)
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  38. Aleix Ruiz-Falqués (forthcoming). The Creative Erudition of Chapaṭa Saddhammajotipāla, a 15th-Century Grammarian and Philosopher From Burma. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-38.
    This paper focuses on the scholastic technique of the Theravāda scholar-monk Chapaṭa Saddhammajotipāla (Burma, fifteenth century CE). Chapaṭa is the author of several scholastic treatises in Pāli, the most voluminous of which is the Suttaniddesa, a commentary on the Pāli grammar of Kaccāyana (ca. sixth to seventh century CE). I offer a general introduction to the Pāli grammatical tradition and especially to the Pāli grammatical tradition of Burma, together with an introduction to the life and works of Chapaṭa. I also (...)
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  39. Mariko Tomita (forthcoming). Issues on Nibbāna with Special Reference to Verse No. 1074 of the Upasīvamāṇavapucchā in the Suttanipāta. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-15.
    This paper discusses verse 1074 of the Suttanipāta’s Upasīvamāṇavapucchā. While various interpretations of the verse are possible due to a lack of textual sources to draw from for interpretation, I attempt to understand this verse—which describes the state of nibbāna using the metaphor of an extinguished fire—through a philological examination of the text itself and other contemporary ones. Specifically, I focus on whether the verse implies that nibbāna takes place in the present life or at and after the end of (...)
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  40. Jan Westerhoff (forthcoming). On the Nihilist Interpretation of Madhyamaka. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-40.
    Madhyamaka philosophy has been frequently characterized as nihilism, not just by its Buddhist and non-Buddhist opponents, but also by some contemporary Buddhologists. This characterization might well strike us as surprising. First, nihilism appears to be straightforwardly inconsistent . It would be curious if a philosophical school holding such an obviously deficient view would have acquired the kind of importance Madhyamaka has acquired in the Asian intellectual landscape over the last two millenia. Second, Madhyamaka by its very name proclaims to tread (...)
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  41. Ołena Łucyszyna (forthcoming). Classical Sāṁkhya on the Relationship Between a Word and Its Meaning. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-21.
    The aim of this article is to reconstruct the classical Sāṁkhya view on the relationship between a word and its meaning. The study embraces all the extant texts of classical Sāṁkhya, but it is based mainly on the Yuktidīpikā, since this commentary contains most of the fragments which are directly related to the topic of our research. The textual analysis has led me to the following conclusion. It is possible to reconstruct two different and conflicting views on the relationship between (...)
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