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Forthcoming articles
  1. Amelia Gangemi, Sacha Bourgeois-Gironde & Francesco Mancini (forthcoming). Feelings of Error in Reasoning—in Search of a Phenomenon. Thinking and Reasoning:1-14.
    Recent research shows that in reasoning tasks, subjects usually produce an initial intuitive answer, accompanied by a metacognitive experience, which has been called feeling of rightness. This paper is aimed at exploring the complimentary experience of feeling of error , that is, the spontaneous, subtle sensation of cognitive uneasiness arising from conflict detection during thinking. We investigate FOE in two studies with the “bat-and-ball” reasoning task, in its standard and isomorphic control versions. Study 1 is a generation study, in which (...)
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  2. J. F. Bonnefon & D. J. Hilton (forthcoming). The Suppression of Modus Ponens as a Case of Pragmatic Preconditional Reasoning. Accepted Subject to Revision. Thinking and Reasoning.
     
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  3. Erika Branchini, Roberto Burro, Ivana Bianchi & Ugo Savardi (forthcoming). Contraries as an Effective Strategy in Geometrical Problem Solving. Thinking and Reasoning:1-34.
    A focused review of the literature on reasoning suggests that mechanisms based upon contraries are of fundamental importance in various abilities. At the same time, the importance of contraries in the human perceptual experience of space has been recently demonstrated in experimental studies. Solving geometry problems represents an interesting case as both reasoning abilities and the manipulation of perceptual–figural aspects are involved.In this study we focus on perceptual changes in geometrical problem solving processes in order to understand whether a mental (...)
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  4. M. Eliades, W. Mansell, A. Stewart & I. Blanchette (forthcoming). Modulation of Reasoning by Emotion: Findings From the Belief-Bias Paradigm. Thinking and Reasoning.
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  5. Keith J. Holyoak & Patricia W. Cheng (forthcoming). Contextual Factors in Deontic Reasoning. Thinking and Reasoning.
     
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  6. Keith J. Holyoak & Patricia W. Cheng (forthcoming). The Taming of Content: Some Thoughts About Domains and Modules. Thinking and Reasoning.
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  7. Lara L. Jones & Zachary Estes (forthcoming). Convergent and Divergent Thinking in Verbal Analogy. Thinking and Reasoning:1-28.
    Individual differences in convergent and divergent thinking may uniquely explain variation in analogical reasoning ability. Across two studies we investigated the relative influences of divergent and convergent thinking as predictors of verbal analogy performance. Performance on both convergent thinking and divergent thinking uniquely predicted performance on both analogy selection and analogical generation tasks . Moreover, convergent and divergent thinking were predictive above and beyond creative behaviours in Study 1 and a composite measure of crystallised intelligence in Study 2. Verbal analogies (...)
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  8. H. Mercier, M. Deguchi, J.-B. Van der Henst & H. Yama (forthcoming). The Benefits of Argumentation Are Cross-Culturally Robust: The Case of Japan. Thinking and Reasoning:1-15.
    Thanks to the exchange of arguments, groups outperform individuals on some tasks, such as solving logical problems. However, these results stem from experiments conducted among Westerners and they could be due to cultural particularities such as tolerance of contradiction and approval of public debate. Other cultures, collectivistic cultures in particular, are said to frown on argumentation. Moreover, some influential intellectual movements, such as Confucianism, disapprove of argumentation. In two experiments, the hypothesis that Easterners might not share the benefits of argumentation (...)
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  9. Catherine E. Seta, John J. Seta, John V. Petrocelli & Michael McCormick (forthcoming). Even Better Than the Real Thing: Alternative Outcome Bias Affects Decision Judgements and Decision Regret. Thinking and Reasoning:1-27.
    Three experiments demonstrated that decisions resulting in considerable amounts of profit, but missed alternative outcomes of greater profits, were rated lower in quality and produced more regret than did decisions that returned lesser amounts of profit but either did not miss or missed only slightly better alternatives. These effects were mediated by upward counterfactuals and moderated by participants’ orientation to the decision context. That decision evaluations were affected by the availability and magnitude of alternative outcomes rather than the positivity of (...)
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  10. Dries Trippas, Gordon Pennycook, Michael F. Verde & Simon J. Handley (forthcoming). Better but Still Biased: Analytic Cognitive Style and Belief Bias. Thinking and Reasoning:1-15.
    Belief bias is the tendency for prior beliefs to influence people's deductive reasoning in two ways: through the application of a simple belief-heuristic and through the application of more effortful reasoning for unbelievable conclusions . Previous research indicates that cognitive ability is the primary determinant of the effect of beliefs on accuracy. In the current study, we show that the mere tendency to engage analytic reasoning is responsible for the effect of cognitive ability on motivated reasoning. The implications of this (...)
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