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Forthcoming articles
  1.  1
    Sudeep Bhatia (forthcoming). The Dynamics of Bidirectional Thought. Thinking and Reasoning:1-46.
    ABSTRACTHigh-level judgement and decision-making tasks display dynamic bidirectional relationships in which salient cues determine how responses are evaluated by decision-makers, and these responses in turn determine the cues that are considered. In this paper, we propose Kosko's bidirectional associative memory network, a minimal two-layer recurrent neural network, as a mathematically tractable toy model with which the properties of existing bidirectional models, and the behavioural implications of these properties, can be studied. We first derive results regarding the dynamics of the BAM (...)
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  2. J. F. Bonnefon & D. J. Hilton (forthcoming). The Suppression of Modus Ponens as a Case of Pragmatic Preconditional Reasoning. Accepted Subject to Revision. Thinking and Reasoning.
     
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  3.  6
    M. Eliades, W. Mansell, A. Stewart & I. Blanchette (forthcoming). Modulation of Reasoning by Emotion: Findings From the Belief-Bias Paradigm. Thinking and Reasoning.
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  4. Denis J. Hilton, John McClure & Briar Moir (forthcoming). Acting Knowingly: Effects of the Agent's Awareness of an Opportunity on Causal Attributions. Thinking and Reasoning:1-34.
    ABSTRACTAccording to difference-based models of causal judgement, the epistemic state of the agent should not affect judgements of cause. Four experiments examined opportunity chains in which a physical event enabled a subsequent proximal cause to produce an outcome. All four experiments showed that when the proximal cause was a human action, it was judged as more causal if the agent was aware of his opportunity than if he was not or if the proximal cause was a physical event. The first (...)
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  5. Keith J. Holyoak & Patricia W. Cheng (forthcoming). Contextual Factors in Deontic Reasoning. Thinking and Reasoning.
     
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  6.  99
    Keith J. Holyoak & Patricia W. Cheng (forthcoming). The Taming of Content: Some Thoughts About Domains and Modules. Thinking and Reasoning.
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  7.  7
    Erik Løhre & Karl Halvor Teigen (forthcoming). There is a 60% Probability, but I Am 70% Certain: Communicative Consequences of External and Internal Expressions of Uncertainty. [REVIEW] Thinking and Reasoning:1-28.
    ABSTRACTCurrent theories of probability recognise a distinction between external certainty and internal certainty. The present studies investigated this distinction in lay people's judgements of probability statements formulated to suggest either an internal or an external interpretation. These subtle differences in wording influenced participants' perceptions and endorsements of such statements, and their impressions of the speaker. External expressions were seen to signal more reliable task duration estimates, and a lower degree of external than internal certainty was deemed necessary to advise a (...)
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  8.  2
    Erik Løhre & Karl Halvor Teigen (forthcoming). There is a 60% Probability, but I Am 70% Certain: Communicative Consequences of External and Internal Expressions of Uncertainty. [REVIEW] Thinking and Reasoning:1-28.
    ABSTRACTCurrent theories of probability recognise a distinction between external certainty and internal certainty. The present studies investigated this distinction in lay people's judgements of probability statements formulated to suggest either an internal or an external interpretation. These subtle differences in wording influenced participants' perceptions and endorsements of such statements, and their impressions of the speaker. External expressions were seen to signal more reliable task duration estimates, and a lower degree of external than internal certainty was deemed necessary to advise a (...)
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  9.  9
    Salvador Mascarenhas & Philipp Koralus (forthcoming). Illusory Inferences with Quantifiers. Thinking and Reasoning:1-16.
    ABSTRACTThe psychological study of reasoning with quantifiers has predominantly focused on inference patterns studied by Aristotle about two millennia ago. Modern logic has shown a wealth of inference patterns involving quantifiers that are far beyond the expressive power of Aristotelian syllogisms, and whose psychology should be explored. We bring to light a novel class of fallacious inference patterns, some of which are so attractive that they are tantamount to cognitive illusions. In tandem with recent insights from linguistics that quantifiers like (...)
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  10.  9
    Carola Salvi, Emanuela Bricolo, John Kounios, Edward Bowden & Mark Beeman (forthcoming). Insight Solutions Are Correct More Often Than Analytic Solutions. Thinking and Reasoning:1-18.
    ABSTRACTHow accurate are insights compared to analytical solutions? In four experiments, we investigated how participants' solving strategies influenced their solution accuracies across different types of problems, including one that was linguistic, one that was visual and two that were mixed visual-linguistic. In each experiment, participants' self-judged insight solutions were, on average, more accurate than their analytic ones. We hypothesised that insight solutions have superior accuracy because they emerge into consciousness in an all-or-nothing fashion when the unconscious solving process is complete, (...)
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  11.  5
    Yixing Shan & Lili Yang (forthcoming). Fast and Frugal Heuristics and Naturalistic Decision Making: A Review of Their Commonalities and Differences. [REVIEW] Thinking and Reasoning:1-23.
    ABSTRACTBoth the fast and frugal heuristics and the naturalistic decision making research programmes have identified important areas of inquiry previously neglected in the traditional study of human judgment and decision making, and have greatly contributed to the understanding of people's real-world decision making under environmental constraints. The two programmes share similar theoretical arguments regarding the rationality, optimality, and role of experience in decision making. Their commonalities have made them appealing to each other, and efforts have been made, by their leading (...)
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