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Forthcoming articles
  1.  0 DLs
    Balazs Aczel, Aba Szollosi & Bence Bago (forthcoming). Lax Monitoring Versus Logical Intuition: The Determinants of Confidence in Conjunction Fallacy. Thinking and Reasoning:1-19.
    ABSTRACTThe general assumption that people fail to notice discrepancy between their answer and the normative answer in the conjunction fallacy task has been challenged by the theory of Logical Intuition. This theory suggests that people can detect the conflict between the heuristic and normative answers even if they do not always manage to inhibit their intuitive choice. This theory gained support from the finding that people report lower levels of confidence in their choice after they commit the conjunction fallacy compared (...)
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    Albert Barque-Duran, Emmanuel M. Pothos, James M. Yearsley & James A. Hampton (forthcoming). Patterns and Evolution of Moral Behaviour: Moral Dynamics in Everyday Life. Thinking and Reasoning:1-26.
    ABSTRACTRecent research on moral dynamics shows that an individual's ethical mind-set moderates the impact of an initial ethical or unethical act on the likelihood of behaving ethically on a subsequent occasion. More specifically, an outcome-based mind-set facilitates Moral Balancing, whereas a rule-based mind-set facilitates Moral Consistency. The objective was to look at the evolution of moral choice across a series of scenarios, that is, to explore if these moral patterns are maintained over time. The results of three studies showed that (...)
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    J. F. Bonnefon & D. J. Hilton (forthcoming). The Suppression of Modus Ponens as a Case of Pragmatic Preconditional Reasoning. Accepted Subject to Revision. Thinking and Reasoning.
     
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  4.  1 DLs
    Karen M. Douglas, Robbie M. Sutton, Mitchell J. Callan, Rael J. Dawtry & Annelie J. Harvey (forthcoming). Someone is Pulling the Strings: Hypersensitive Agency Detection and Belief in Conspiracy Theories. Thinking and Reasoning:1-21.
    We hypothesised that belief in conspiracy theories would be predicted by the general tendency to attribute agency and intentionality where it is unlikely to exist. We further hypothesised that this tendency would explain the relationship between education level and belief in conspiracy theories, where lower levels of education have been found to be associated with higher conspiracy belief. In Study 1 participants were more likely to agree with a range of conspiracy theories if they also tended to attribute intentionality and (...)
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    M. Eliades, W. Mansell, A. Stewart & I. Blanchette (forthcoming). Modulation of Reasoning by Emotion: Findings From the Belief-Bias Paradigm. Thinking and Reasoning.
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    Denis J. Hilton, Laetitia Charalambides & Stéphanie Hoareau-Blanchet (forthcoming). Reasoning About Rights and Duties: Mental Models, World Knowledge and Pragmatic Interpretation. Thinking and Reasoning:1-34.
    We address the way verb-based and rule-content knowledge are combined in understanding institutional deontics. Study 1 showed that the institutional regulations used in our studies were readily categorised into one of two content groups: rights or duties. Participants perceived rights as benefiting the addressees identified by the rule, whereas they perceived duties as benefiting the collective that imposed the rule. Studies 2, 3, and 4 showed that rule content had clear effects on perceptions of violations and relevance of cases for (...)
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    Keith J. Holyoak & Patricia W. Cheng (forthcoming). Contextual Factors in Deontic Reasoning. Thinking and Reasoning.
     
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  8.  94 DLs
    Keith J. Holyoak & Patricia W. Cheng (forthcoming). The Taming of Content: Some Thoughts About Domains and Modules. Thinking and Reasoning.
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    Erik Løhre & Karl Halvor Teigen (forthcoming). There is a 60% Probability, but I Am 70% Certain: Communicative Consequences of External and Internal Expressions of Uncertainty. [REVIEW] Thinking and Reasoning:1-28.
    ABSTRACTCurrent theories of probability recognise a distinction between external certainty and internal certainty. The present studies investigated this distinction in lay people's judgements of probability statements formulated to suggest either an internal or an external interpretation. These subtle differences in wording influenced participants' perceptions and endorsements of such statements, and their impressions of the speaker. External expressions were seen to signal more reliable task duration estimates, and a lower degree of external than internal certainty was deemed necessary to advise a (...)
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    H. Mercier, M. Deguchi, J.-B. Van der Henst & H. Yama (forthcoming). The Benefits of Argumentation Are Cross-Culturally Robust: The Case of Japan. Thinking and Reasoning:1-15.
    Thanks to the exchange of arguments, groups outperform individuals on some tasks, such as solving logical problems. However, these results stem from experiments conducted among Westerners and they could be due to cultural particularities such as tolerance of contradiction and approval of public debate. Other cultures, collectivistic cultures in particular, are said to frown on argumentation. Moreover, some influential intellectual movements, such as Confucianism, disapprove of argumentation. In two experiments, the hypothesis that Easterners might not share the benefits of argumentation (...)
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    Guy Politzer & Jean Baratgin (forthcoming). Deductive Schemas with Uncertain Premises Using Qualitative Probability Expressions. Thinking and Reasoning:1-21.
    ABSTRACTThe new paradigm in the psychology of reasoning redirects the investigation of deduction conceptually and methodologically because the premises and the conclusion of the inferences are assumed to be uncertain. A probabilistic counterpart of the concept of logical validity and a method to assess whether individuals comply with it must be defined. Conceptually, we used de Finetti's coherence as a normative framework to assess individuals' performance. Methodologically, we presented inference schemas whose premises had various levels of probability that contained non-numerical (...)
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    Jennifer Vonk & Jerrica Pitzen (forthcoming). Religiosity and the Formulation of Causal Attributions. Thinking and Reasoning:1-31.
    ABSTRACTResearchers have suggested that religious individuals engage primarily in intuitive over analytic processing. We investigated a connection between specific aspects of religiosity and the attribution of causation to social and physical events. College undergraduates completed measures of religiosity online and were asked to determine the causes of events that varied in type, outcome, and likelihood, as well as the personality characteristics of the protagonist. Individuals with greater intrinsic religious orientation, fundamentalism, who viewed God as loving, who were more dogmatic, and (...)
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    Hanne M. Watkins & Simon M. Laham (forthcoming). An Investigation of the Use of Linguistic Probes “by” and “in Order to” in Assessing Moral Grammar. Thinking and Reasoning:1-15.
    ABSTRACTProponents of the linguistic analogy suggest that methodologies originally developed for investigating linguistic grammar can also be fruitfully applied to the empirical study of moral grammar: the causal and intentional representations of moral events which – according to the linguistic analogy – drive moral judgements. In the current study, we put this claim to the empirical test. Participants were presented with moral dilemmas which previously have been shown to implement a central principle in moral judgements: the principle of double effect. (...)
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