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Forthcoming articles
  1.  5
    Maria P. Ferretti (forthcoming). Risk Imposition and Freedom. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15605437.
    Various authors hold that what is wrong with risk imposition is that being at risk diminishes the opportunities available to an agent. Arguably, even when risk does not result in material or psychological damages, it still represents a setback in terms of some legitimate interests. However, it remains to be specified what those interests are. This article argues that risk imposition represents a diminishment of overall freedom. Freedom will be characterized in empirical terms, as the range of unimpeded actions available (...)
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  2.  1
    Gerald Lang & Rob Lawlor (forthcoming). Numbers Scepticism, Equal Chances, and Pluralism: Taurek Revisited. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15618967.
    The ‘standard interpretation’ of John Taurek’s argument in ‘Should the Numbers Count?’ imputes two theses to him: first, ‘numbers scepticism’, or scepticism about the moral force of an appeal to the mere number of individuals saved in conflict cases; and second, the ‘equal greatest chances’ principle of rescue, which requires that every individual has an equal chance of being rescued. The standard interpretation is criticized here on a number of grounds. First, whilst Taurek clearly believes that equal chances are all-important, (...)
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  3.  11
    Michael Moehler (forthcoming). Orthodox Rational Choice Contractarianism: Before and After Gauthier. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15599102.
    In a recent article, Gauthier (2013) rejects orthodox rational choice contractarianism in favor of a revisionist approach to the social contract that, according to him, justifies his principle of maximin proportionate gain (formerly the principle of minimax relative concession or maximin relative benefit) as a principle of distributive justice. I agree with Gauthier that his principle of maximin proportionate gain cannot be justified by orthodox rational choice contractarianism. I argue, however, that orthodox rational choice contractarianism, before and after Gauthier, is (...)
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  4.  2
    Ingvild Almås, Alexander W. Cappelen, Kjell G. Salvanes, Erik Ø Sørensen & Bertil Tungodden (forthcoming). Fairness and Family Background. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15618966.
    Fairness preferences fundamentally affect individual behavior and play an important role in shaping social and political institutions. However, people differ both with respect to what they view as fair and with respect to how much weight they attach to fairness considerations. In this article, we study the role of family background in explaining these heterogeneities in fairness preferences. In particular, we examine how socioeconomic background relates to fairness views and to how people make trade-offs between fairness and self-interest. To study (...)
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  5.  5
    Alice Baderin (forthcoming). Political Theory and Public Opinion Against Democratic Restraint. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15621044.
    How should political theorists go about their work if they are democrats? Given their democratic commitments, should they develop theories that are responsive to the views and concerns of their fellow citizens at large? Is there a balance to be struck, within political theory, between truth seeking and democratic responsiveness? The article addresses this question about the relationship between political theory, public opinion and democracy. I criticize the way in which some political theorists have appealed to the value of democratic (...)
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  6.  1
    Elizabeth Brake (forthcoming). Fair Care Elder Care and Distributive Justice. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15600831.
    Caring relationships and material caregiving are politically significant goods that should be distributed according to principles of justice. I argue that, within Rawlsian liberalism, care should be considered a primary good and propose a third principle of justice requiring access to the social and legal supports of caring relationships. I examine what social and legal institutions supporting care might require, with particular attention to allowing the infirm elderly and persons with disabilities access to caring relationships. I propose the formation of (...)
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  7.  3
    Daniel Halliday (forthcoming). Private Education, Positional Goods, and the Arms Race Problem. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15603717.
    This article defends the view that markets in education need to be restricted, in light of the problem posed by what I call the ‘educational arms race’. Markets in education have a tendency to distort an important balance between education’s role as a gatekeeper – its ‘screening’ function – and its role in helping children develop as part of a preparation for adult life. This tendency is not merely a contingent fact about markets: It can be traced to ways in (...)
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  8.  1
    Hugh Lazenby (forthcoming). Mistakes and the Continuity Test. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15573462.
    In a series of recent articles, Matthew Clayton, Andrew Williams and Rasmus Sommer Hansen and Soren Flinch Midtgaard argue that a key virtue of Ronald Dworkin’s account of distributive justice, Equality of Resources, is that it provides a distribution that is continuous with the evaluations of the individuals whom it ranges over. The idea of continuity, or as Williams calls it the ‘continuity test’, limits distributive claims in at least one important way: one person cannot claim compensation from another when (...)
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  9.  4
    Christine Le Clainche & Sandy Tubeuf (forthcoming). Nudging, Intervening or Rewarding A Discussion on the Constraints and the Degree of Control on Health Status. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15600832.
    Public health policies typically assume that there are characteristics and constraints over health that an individual cannot control and that there are choices that an individual could change if he is nudged or provided with incentives. We consider that health is determined by a range of personal, social, economic and environmental factors and we discuss to what extent an individual can control these factors. In particular, we assume that the observed health status of an individual is a result of factors (...)
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  10.  7
    Gina Schouten (forthcoming). Citizenship, Reciprocity, and the Gendered Division of Labor A Stability Argument for Gender Egalitarian Political Interventions. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15600830.
    Despite women’s increased labor force participation, household divisions of labor remain highly unequal. Properly implemented, gender egalitarian political interventions such as work time regulation, dependent care provisions, and family leave initiatives can induce families to share work more equally than they currently do. But do these interventions constitute legitimate uses of political power? In this article, I defend the political legitimacy of these interventions. Using the conception of citizenship at the heart of political liberalism, I argue that citizens would accept (...)
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