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Forthcoming articles
  1.  9
    Maria P. Ferretti (forthcoming). Risk Imposition and Freedom. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15605437.
    Various authors hold that what is wrong with risk imposition is that being at risk diminishes the opportunities available to an agent. Arguably, even when risk does not result in material or psychological damages, it still represents a setback in terms of some legitimate interests. However, it remains to be specified what those interests are. This article argues that risk imposition represents a diminishment of overall freedom. Freedom will be characterized in empirical terms, as the range of unimpeded actions available (...)
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  2.  7
    Gerald Lang & Rob Lawlor (forthcoming). Numbers Scepticism, Equal Chances, and Pluralism: Taurek Revisited. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15618967.
    The ‘standard interpretation’ of John Taurek’s argument in ‘Should the Numbers Count?’ imputes two theses to him: first, ‘numbers scepticism’, or scepticism about the moral force of an appeal to the mere number of individuals saved in conflict cases; and second, the ‘equal greatest chances’ principle of rescue, which requires that every individual has an equal chance of being rescued. The standard interpretation is criticized here on a number of grounds. First, whilst Taurek clearly believes that equal chances are all-important, (...)
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  3.  4
    Ingvild Almås, Alexander W. Cappelen, Kjell G. Salvanes, Erik Ø Sørensen & Bertil Tungodden (forthcoming). Fairness and Family Background. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15618966.
    Fairness preferences fundamentally affect individual behavior and play an important role in shaping social and political institutions. However, people differ both with respect to what they view as fair and with respect to how much weight they attach to fairness considerations. In this article, we study the role of family background in explaining these heterogeneities in fairness preferences. In particular, we examine how socioeconomic background relates to fairness views and to how people make trade-offs between fairness and self-interest. To study (...)
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  4.  2
    Elizabeth Brake (forthcoming). Fair Care Elder Care and Distributive Justice. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15600831.
    Caring relationships and material caregiving are politically significant goods that should be distributed according to principles of justice. I argue that, within Rawlsian liberalism, care should be considered a primary good and propose a third principle of justice requiring access to the social and legal supports of caring relationships. I examine what social and legal institutions supporting care might require, with particular attention to allowing the infirm elderly and persons with disabilities access to caring relationships. I propose the formation of (...)
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  5.  3
    Clément Fontan, François Claveau & Peter Dietsch (forthcoming). Central Banking and Inequalities Taking Off the Blinders. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-16651056.
    What is the relation between monetary policy and inequalities in income and wealth? This question has received insufficient attention, especially in light of the unconventional policies introduced since the 2008 financial crisis. The article analyzes three ways in which the concern central banks show for inequalities in their official statements remains incomplete and underdeveloped. First, central banks tend to care about inequality for instrumental reasons only. When they do assign intrinsic value to containing inequalities, they shy away from trade-offs with (...)
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  6.  6
    Pietro Maffettone (forthcoming). Benevolent Absolutisms, Incentives and Rawls’ The Law of Peoples. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-16650540.
    Rawls’ The Law of Peoples does not offer a clear principled account of the way in which liberal and decent peoples should deal with benevolent absolutisms. Within the Rawlsian framework, benevolent absolutisms are a type of society that respects basic human rights and is not externally aggressive. Rawls rules out the use of coercion to engage with benevolent absolutisms but does not provide an alternative strategy. The article develops one, namely, it argues that liberal and decent peoples should use positive (...)
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  7.  6
    Blain Neufeld (forthcoming). Freedom, Money and Justice as Fairness. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-16651058.
    The first principle of Rawls’s conception of justice secures a set of ‘basic liberties’ equally for all citizens within the constitutional structure of society. The ‘worth’ of citizens’ liberties, however, may vary depending upon their wealth. Against Rawls, Cohen contends that an absence of money often can directly constrain citizens’ freedom and not simply its worth. This is because money often can remove legally enforced constraints on what citizens can do. Cohen’s argument – if modified to apply to citizens’ ‘moral (...)
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  8.  17
    Gina Schouten (forthcoming). Citizenship, Reciprocity, and the Gendered Division of Labor A Stability Argument for Gender Egalitarian Political Interventions. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-15600830.
    Despite women’s increased labor force participation, household divisions of labor remain highly unequal. Properly implemented, gender egalitarian political interventions such as work time regulation, dependent care provisions, and family leave initiatives can induce families to share work more equally than they currently do. But do these interventions constitute legitimate uses of political power? In this article, I defend the political legitimacy of these interventions. Using the conception of citizenship at the heart of political liberalism, I argue that citizens would accept (...)
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  9.  5
    Katy Wells (forthcoming). The Right to Personal Property. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-16653859.
    The subject of this article is the Rawlsian right to personal property. Adequate discussion of this right has long been absent from the literature, and the recent rise in interest in other areas of Rawlsian thought on property makes the issue particularly pertinent. The right to personal property as proposed by orthodox Rawlsians – in this article, the position is represented by Rawls himself – is best understood, I claim, either as a right to be able to privately own housing (...)
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  10.  5
    Scott Wisor (forthcoming). Conditional Coercion Versus Rights Diagnostics Two Approaches to Human Rights Protection. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-16650541.
    Scholars in philosophy, political science, and the policy community have recently advocated for a ‘sticks and carrots’, or conditional-coercion, approach to human rights violations. On this model, rights violators are conceived of as rational agents who should be rewarded for good behavior and punished for bad behavior by other states seeking to improve human rights abroad. External states concerned about human rights abroad should impose punishments against foreign rights violators, and these punitive measures should not be lifted until rights violations (...)
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