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  1.  0 DLs
    Spencer Jay Case (2015). Gratitude Toward Veterans: Why Americans Should Not Be Very Grateful to Veterans. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):197-199.
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    Joseph O. Chapa (2015). Afterwar: Healing the Moral Wounds of Our Soldiers. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):194-196.
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    Paul R. Daniels (2015). Just War and Administrative Personnel in the Private Military Industry. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):146-161.
    ABSTRACTI argue that, according to just war theory, those who work as administrative personnel in the private military industry can be permissibly harmed while at work by enemy combatants. That is, for better or worse, a just war theorist should consider all those who work as administrative personnel in the private military industry as either: individuals who may be permissibly restrained with lethal force while at work; or individuals who may be harmed by permissible attacks against their workplace. In doing (...)
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    Paul Richard Daniels (2015). Just War and Non-Combatants in the Private Military Industry. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):146-161.
    I argue that, according to Just War Theory, those who work as administrative personnel in the private military industry can be permissibly harmed while at work by enemy combatants. That is, for better or worse, a Just War theorist should consider all those who work as administrative personnel in the private military industry either: (i) individuals who may be permissibly restrained with lethal force while at work, or (ii) individuals who may be harmed by permissible attacks against their workplace. In (...)
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    The Editors (2015). Introduction to the Symposium. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):104-106.
    ABSTRACTIn this volume, we include four commentaries to Larry Minear's important article ‘Conscience and Carnage in Iraq and Afghanistan’ from our 2014 volume, as well as a response from the author. The commentaries and the author's response ponder various aspects of the challenge of conscientious objection to military service. Is there room for such objection within an all-volunteer force? Do such objectors serve an important role in our society – and in the military? May one object to some wars conscientiously, (...)
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    Michał Klincewicz (2015). Autonomous Weapons Systems, the Frame Problem and Computer Security. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):162-176.
    ABSTRACTUnlike human soldiers, autonomous weapons systems are unaffected by psychological factors that would cause them to act outside the chain of command. This is a compelling moral justification for their development and eventual deployment in war. To achieve this level of sophistication, the software that runs AWS will have to first solve two problems: the frame problem and the representation problem. Solutions to these problems will inevitably involve complex software. Complex software will create security risks and will make AWS critically (...)
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    Larry Minear (2015). The State of the Debate: A Response From the Author. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):125-127.
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    Jeff Montrose (2015). Conscientious Objection and the Just Treatment of Personnel. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):123-124.
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    Avery Plaw & João Franco Reis (2015). Learning to Live with Drones: Answering Jeremy Waldron and the Neutralist Critique. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):128-145.
    ABSTRACTAmong the most forceful and provocative criticisms that have been leveled at US drone strikes against alleged terrorists far from conventional battlefields has been Jeremy Waldron's charge that they cannot be justified in terms of a neutral principle that most reasonable people would accept. In essence, Waldron asks ‘whether we are comfortable with [such a norm] in the hands of our enemies’. He thinks most people will say ‘no’ and that this is a reason not to embrace a permissive norm (...)
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    Chad W. Seagren (2015). Military Ethics and Moral Blame Across Agency Lines. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):177-193.
    ABSTRACTIn this article, I examine the extent to which military officers are morally responsible for the actions of others by virtue of shared membership in various groups. I argue that career military officers share membership in morally relevant groups that include their branch of service, Department of Defense and the entire Executive Branch of Government, and I outline the circumstances under which career officers bear moral culpability for the actions of members of this group. A number of implications arise from (...)
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    Ted van Baarda (2015). Between Ethics and Law: The Ambiguous Position of the State. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):113-117.
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    Franklin Eric Wester (2015). The Extinction of Conscientious Objectors in the Armed Forces? Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):107-112.
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    Mark Zelcer (2015). Conscientious Objection and the Transformative Nature of War. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):118-122.
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  14.  5 DLs
    David M. Barnes (2015). Thank You for Your Service. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):98-100.
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  15.  1 DLs
    Joel N. Brown (2015). The Bombers and the Bombed: Allied Air War Over Europe, 1940–1945. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):101-102.
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    Gregg Frazer (2015). The American Revolution: Not a Just War. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):35-56.
    Was the American Revolution a just war? Did it adhere to the accepted standards for determining a just war? This article evaluates the American situation in the 1770s, including the Americans’ claims to be Englishmen, the level of taxation in the colonies, their level of freedom, and the violence perpetrated by American colonists. It also investigates the validity of the primary American argument – no taxation without representation. The reporting of key events and American propaganda is explored along with its (...)
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    Holger Hoock (2015). Jus in Bello, Rape and the British Army in the American Revolutionary War. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):74-97.
    This essay offers a case study in jus in bello in the American Revolutionary War by focusing on responses to sexual violence committed against American women by soldiers in the occupying British army and their Loyalist auxiliaries. Two main bodies of sources are juxtaposed in order to explore the contexts and manner in which jus in bello was adjudicated: British courts-martial and American Congressional investigations documenting British and Loyalist breaches of the codes of war. By putting the fragmentary evidence of (...)
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    James Kirby Martin (2015). A Contagion of Violence: The Ideal of Jus in Bello Versus the Realities of Fighting on the New York Frontier During the Revolutionary War. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):57-73.
    European Enlightenment thinkers like Emer de Vattel in his epic work The Laws of Nations argued that engaging in warfare should comply, as much as possible, with humane rules in the treatment of both combatants and noncombatants. Encapsulated by the phrase jus in bello, or justice in warfare, the question remains whether this idealist doctrine had application in military actions conducted during the Revolutionary War fought over the issue of American independence. This essay concludes that in such frontier regions as (...)
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    Glenn Moots (2015). Guest Editor's Introduction: The American Revolution 240 Years Later: Was It a Just War? Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):3-6.
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    Eric Patterson & Nathan Gill (2015). The Declaration of the United Colonies: America's First Just War Statement. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):7-34.
    Was the American War for Independence just? In July 1775, a full year before the Declaration of Independence, the colonists argued that they had the right to self-defense. They made this argument using language that accords with what we can broadly call classical just war thinking, based, inter alia, on their claim that their provincial authorities had a responsibility to defend the colonists from British violence. In the 1775 Declaration of the United Colonies, written two months after British troops attacked (...)
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    Henrik Syse & Martin L. Cook (2015). Editors' Introduction: Whose Justice? Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):1-2.
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