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  1. Dr James L. Cook (2014). The Future of the Just War: New Critical Essays. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):203-210.
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  2. Larry Minear (2014). Conscience and Carnage in Afghanistan and Iraq: US Veterans Ponder the Experience. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):137-157.
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  3. Jim Robinson (2014). Plato and the Virtues of Military Units. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):190-202.
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  4. Kristin Bergtora Sandvik (2014). Regulating War in the Shadow of Law: Toward a Re-Articulation of ROE. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):118-136.
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  5. Henrik Syse & Martin L. Cook (2014). 100 Years Hence…. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):117-117.
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  6. Anya Topolski (2014). Relationality: An Ethical Response to the Tensions of Network-Enabled Operations in the Kunduz Air Strikes. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):158-173.
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  7. Andrei G. Zavaliy & Michael Aristidou (2014). Courage: A Modern Look at an Ancient Virtue. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):174-189.
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  8. Cheryl Abbate (2014). Assuming Risk: A Critical Analysis of a Soldier's Duty to Prevent Collateral Casualties. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):70-93.
    Recent discussions in the just war literature suggest that soldiers have a duty to assume certain risks in order to protect the lives of all innocent civilians. I challenge this principle of risk by arguing that it is justified neither as a principle that guides the conduct of combat soldiers, nor as a principle that guides commanders in the US military. I demonstrate that the principle of risk fails on the first account because it requires soldiers both to violate their (...)
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  9. Dr James L. Cook (2014). Killing Without Heart: Limits on Robotic Warfare in an Age of Persistent Conflict. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):106-111.
    (2014). Killing without Heart: Limits on Robotic Warfare in an Age of Persistent Conflict. Journal of Military Ethics: Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 106-111. doi: 10.1080/15027570.2014.910017.
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  10. Dr James L. Cook (2014). Duty. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):112-115.
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  11. George R. Lucas Jr (2014). Ethics and Cyber Conflict: A Response to JME 12:1 (2013). Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):20-31.
    (2014). Ethics and Cyber Conflict: A Response to JME 12:1 (2013) Journal of Military Ethics: Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 20-31. doi: 10.1080/15027570.2014.908012.
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  12. Dimitrios Machairas (2014). The Ethical Implications of the Use of Private Military Force: Regulatable or Irreconcilable? Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):49-69.
    (2014). The Ethical Implications of the Use of Private Military Force: Regulatable or Irreconcilable? Journal of Military Ethics: Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 49-69. doi: 10.1080/15027570.2014.908645.
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  13. Valerie Morkevicius (2014). Tin Men: Ethics, Cybernetics and the Importance of Soul. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):3-19.
    (2014). Tin Men: Ethics, Cybernetics and the Importance of Soul. Journal of Military Ethics: Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 3-19. doi: 10.1080/15027570.2014.908011.
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  14. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2014). Collateral Damage and the Principle of Due Care. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):94-105.
    This article focuses on the ethical implications of so-called ‘collateral damage’. It develops a moral typology of collateral harm to innocents, which occurs as a side effect of military or quasi-military action. Distinguishing between accidental and incidental collateral damage, it introduces four categories of such damage: negligent, oblivious, knowing and reckless collateral damage. Objecting mainstream versions of the doctrine of double effect, the article argues that in order for any collateral damage to be morally permissible, violent agents must comply with (...)
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  15. Uwe Steinhoff (2014). Just Cause and 'Right Intention'. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):32-48.
    I argue that the criterion of just cause is not independent of proportionality and other valid jus ad bellum criteria. One cannot know whether there is a just cause without knowing whether the other (valid) criteria (apart from ‘right intention’) are satisfied. The advantage of this account is that it is applicable to all wars, even to wars where nobody will be killed or where the enemy has not committed a rights violation but can be justifiably warred against anyway. This (...)
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  16. Henrik Syse & Martin L. Cook (2014). Editors' Introduction: New Times, or the Same Old? Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):1-2.
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  17. Paul T. Berghaus & Nathan L. Cartagena (2014). Developing Good Soldiers: The Problem of Fragmentation Within the Army. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):287-303.
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  18. Megan Braun & Daniel R. Brunstetter (2014). Rethinking the Criterion for Assessing Cia-Targeted Killings: Drones, Proportionality and Jus Ad Vim. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):304-324.
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  19. Walter E. Carter Jr (2014). The Ibar Bridge Attack. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):373-375.
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  20. Emmanuel R. Goffi (2014). The Ibar Bridge Attack: A Moral Assessment. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):380-382.
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  21. Mark N. Jensen (2014). Hard Moral Choices in the Military. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):341-356.
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  22. Dr Rebecca J. Johnson (2014). Issues in Military Ethics: To Support and Defend the Constitution. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):383-384.
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  23. Jeff Montrose (2014). Unjust War and a Soldier's Moral Dilemma. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):325-340.
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  24. Gregory M. Reichberg (2014). Second Response to Parsons. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):370-372.
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  25. Michael N. Schmitt (2014). The Ibar Bridge Attack: A Legal Assessment. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):376-379.
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