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  1. David M. Barnes (2015). Thank You for Your Service. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):98-100.
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  2. Joel N. Brown (2015). The Bombers and the Bombed: Allied Air War Over Europe, 1940–1945. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):101-102.
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  3. Gregg Frazer (2015). The American Revolution: Not a Just War. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):35-56.
    Was the American Revolution a just war? Did it adhere to the accepted standards for determining a just war? This article evaluates the American situation in the 1770s, including the Americans’ claims to be Englishmen, the level of taxation in the colonies, their level of freedom, and the violence perpetrated by American colonists. It also investigates the validity of the primary American argument – no taxation without representation. The reporting of key events and American propaganda is explored along with its (...)
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  4. Holger Hoock (2015). Jus in Bello, Rape and the British Army in the American Revolutionary War. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):74-97.
    This essay offers a case study in jus in bello in the American Revolutionary War by focusing on responses to sexual violence committed against American women by soldiers in the occupying British army and their Loyalist auxiliaries. Two main bodies of sources are juxtaposed in order to explore the contexts and manner in which jus in bello was adjudicated: British courts-martial and American Congressional investigations documenting British and Loyalist breaches of the codes of war. By putting the fragmentary evidence of (...)
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  5. James Kirby Martin (2015). A Contagion of Violence: The Ideal of Jus in Bello Versus the Realities of Fighting on the New York Frontier During the Revolutionary War. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):57-73.
    European Enlightenment thinkers like Emer de Vattel in his epic work The Laws of Nations argued that engaging in warfare should comply, as much as possible, with humane rules in the treatment of both combatants and noncombatants. Encapsulated by the phrase jus in bello, or justice in warfare, the question remains whether this idealist doctrine had application in military actions conducted during the Revolutionary War fought over the issue of American independence. This essay concludes that in such frontier regions as (...)
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  6. Glenn Moots (2015). Guest Editor's Introduction: The American Revolution 240 Years Later: Was It a Just War? Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):3-6.
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  7. Eric Patterson & Nathan Gill (2015). The Declaration of the United Colonies: America's First Just War Statement. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):7-34.
    Was the American War for Independence just? In July 1775, a full year before the Declaration of Independence, the colonists argued that they had the right to self-defense. They made this argument using language that accords with what we can broadly call classical just war thinking, based, inter alia, on their claim that their provincial authorities had a responsibility to defend the colonists from British violence. In the 1775 Declaration of the United Colonies, written two months after British troops attacked (...)
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  8. Henrik Syse & Martin L. Cook (2015). Editors' Introduction: Whose Justice? Journal of Military Ethics 14 (1):1-2.
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