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  1. Matthew Beard (2014). Virtuous Soldiers: A Role for the Liberal Arts? Journal of Military Ethics 13 (3):274-294.
    The modern soldier is faced with a complex moral and psychological landscape. As Nancy Sherman puts it in The Untold War: Inside the Hearts and Minds of our Soldiers, ‘soldiers go to war to fight external enemies… but most fight inner wars as well.’ The modern soldier is no longer simply a warrior: he is at once a peacekeeper, diplomat, leader, sibling and friend. In the face of such challenges, some responsible for the teaching of soldiers have endeavoured to incorporate (...)
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  2. Jean-François Caron (2014). An Ethical and Judicial Framework for Mercy Killing on the Battlefield. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (3):228-239.
    As a follow-up to Stephen Deakin's analysis on the ethics of mercy killing on the battlefield in this journal, this article proposes a moral justification for this type of action, as well as a judicial framework that could clarify what qualifies as such morally permissible action. Based upon contemporary cases, it argues that the current military codes of conduct are incoherent when it comes to the punishment of soldiers who commit mercy killings, and that the military codes of justice should (...)
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  3. James L. Cook (2014). The Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan, 2001–2014. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (3):298-300.
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  4. Florian Demont-Biaggi (2014). When Soldiers Say No: Selective Conscientious Objection in the Modern Military. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (3):295-297.
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  5. Phillip W. Gray (2014). Weaponized NonCombatants: A Moral Conundrum of Future Asymmetrical Warfare. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (3):240-256.
    Do noncombatants in warfare receive immunity because of their subjective or objective characteristics? Can a noncombatant be ‘weaponized’, and if so, how does this weaponization change the noncombatant's moral status as protected from direct attack? The purpose of this article is to analyze the moral issues that arise when noncombatants are made into weapons, specifically as delivery systems for biological weaponry. Examining such a tactic, I go on to explore how the problems that arise from ‘weaponized’ noncombatants illustrate deeper problems (...)
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  6. M. Shane Riza (2014). Two-Dimensional Warfare: Combatants, Warriors, and Our Post-Predator Collective Experience. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (3):257-273.
    This article explores the effects of our technological way of war, for the first time driving toward total combatant immunity, on the psyche of combatants and the ethos of a warrior. It is a plea for the preservation of a warrior spirit, or at least a warrior class, that views war in a philosophical and personal manner. The article posits that without a sense of the tragic, without a personal test of will and skill often at great individual risk, we (...)
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  7. Heather M. Roff (2014). The Strategic Robot Problem: Lethal Autonomous Weapons in War. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (3):211-227.
    The present debate over the creation and potential deployment of lethal autonomous weapons, or ‘killer robots’, is garnering more and more attention. Much of the argument revolves around whether such machines would be able to uphold the principle of noncombatant immunity. However, much of the present debate fails to take into consideration the practical realties of contemporary armed conflict, particularly generating military objectives and the adherence to a targeting process. This paper argues that we must look to the targeting process (...)
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  8. Dr James L. Cook (2014). The Future of the Just War: New Critical Essays. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):203-210.
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  9. Larry Minear (2014). Conscience and Carnage in Afghanistan and Iraq: US Veterans Ponder the Experience. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):137-157.
    Against the backdrop of the massive carnage of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, this article examines the institution of conscientious objection and the treatment of conscientious objectors. It concludes that while the number of objectors discharged from the US military in the two wars was small, the issues of conscience they articulated resonated widely through the ranks. This article seeks to make available their experience as a resource to inform the broader ongoing debate about the wars and their implications (...)
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  10. Jim Robinson (2014). Plato and the Virtues of Military Units. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):190-202.
    In this article, I use Plato's functional account of justice and temperance in the Republic to contend that military units have at least two virtues that are not reducible to the virtues of the individuals in the units. Specifically, I use Plato's discussion of justice and temperance in the city-state to focus on the nature of these virtues in military units. I support my thesis by pointing out the value of attributing them to military units and by indicating some of (...)
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  11. Kristin Bergtora Sandvik (2014). Regulating War in the Shadow of Law: Toward a Re-Articulation of ROE. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):118-136.
    The experiences of multinational engagements in Kosovo in the late 1990s, and then more recently Afghanistan from 2001 and Iraq from 2003, have led to a political debate about the linkage between legality and legitimacy. At the heart of contemporary political and academic discourses about war are questions about the scope and content of the law of armed conflict. Considerably less attention has been given to another mode of regulating warfare, namely Rules of Engagement (ROE), despite their operational significance. This (...)
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  12. Henrik Syse & Martin L. Cook (2014). 100 Years Hence…. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):117-117.
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  13. Anya Topolski (2014). Relationality: An Ethical Response to the Tensions of Network-Enabled Operations in the Kunduz Air Strikes. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):158-173.
    ?German warplanes fired on two hijacked military fuel trucks in the northern province of Kunduz killing an estimated 90 villagers?.? While the debate over what is now known as the Kunduz Air Strike in 2009 has by no means ended, it has ? or so I shall argue ? missed a key point. By allowing the media's witchlike hunt for a scapegoat to dominate the military debate, a critical consideration concerning the ethics of network-enabled operations has been overlooked. As such, (...)
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  14. Andrei G. Zavaliy & Michael Aristidou (2014). Courage: A Modern Look at an Ancient Virtue. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):174-189.
    The purpose of this article is twofold: to demystify the ancient concept of courage, making it more palpable for the modern reader, and to suggest the reasonably specific constraints that would restrict the contemporary tendency of indiscriminate attribution of this virtue. The discussion of courage will incorporate both the classical interpretations of this trait of character, and the empirical studies into the complex relation between the emotion of fear and behavior. The Aristotelian thesis that courage consists in overcoming the fear (...)
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  15. Cheryl Abbate (2014). Assuming Risk: A Critical Analysis of a Soldier's Duty to Prevent Collateral Casualties. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):70-93.
    Recent discussions in the just war literature suggest that soldiers have a duty to assume certain risks in order to protect the lives of all innocent civilians. I challenge this principle of risk by arguing that it is justified neither as a principle that guides the conduct of combat soldiers, nor as a principle that guides commanders in the US military. I demonstrate that the principle of risk fails on the first account because it requires soldiers both to violate their (...)
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  16. Dr James L. Cook (2014). Killing Without Heart: Limits on Robotic Warfare in an Age of Persistent Conflict. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):106-111.
    (2014). Killing without Heart: Limits on Robotic Warfare in an Age of Persistent Conflict. Journal of Military Ethics: Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 106-111. doi: 10.1080/15027570.2014.910017.
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  17. Dr James L. Cook (2014). Duty. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):112-115.
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  18. George R. Lucas Jr (2014). Ethics and Cyber Conflict: A Response to JME 12:1 (2013). Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):20-31.
    (2014). Ethics and Cyber Conflict: A Response to JME 12:1 (2013) Journal of Military Ethics: Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 20-31. doi: 10.1080/15027570.2014.908012.
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  19. Dimitrios Machairas (2014). The Ethical Implications of the Use of Private Military Force: Regulatable or Irreconcilable? Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):49-69.
    (2014). The Ethical Implications of the Use of Private Military Force: Regulatable or Irreconcilable? Journal of Military Ethics: Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 49-69. doi: 10.1080/15027570.2014.908645.
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  20. Valerie Morkevicius (2014). Tin Men: Ethics, Cybernetics and the Importance of Soul. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):3-19.
    (2014). Tin Men: Ethics, Cybernetics and the Importance of Soul. Journal of Military Ethics: Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 3-19. doi: 10.1080/15027570.2014.908011.
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  21. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2014). Collateral Damage and the Principle of Due Care. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):94-105.
    This article focuses on the ethical implications of so-called ‘collateral damage’. It develops a moral typology of collateral harm to innocents, which occurs as a side effect of military or quasi-military action. Distinguishing between accidental and incidental collateral damage, it introduces four categories of such damage: negligent, oblivious, knowing and reckless collateral damage. Objecting mainstream versions of the doctrine of double effect, the article argues that in order for any collateral damage to be morally permissible, violent agents must comply with (...)
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  22. Uwe Steinhoff (2014). Just Cause and 'Right Intention'. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):32-48.
    I argue that the criterion of just cause is not independent of proportionality and other valid jus ad bellum criteria. One cannot know whether there is a just cause without knowing whether the other (valid) criteria (apart from ‘right intention’) are satisfied. The advantage of this account is that it is applicable to all wars, even to wars where nobody will be killed or where the enemy has not committed a rights violation but can be justifiably warred against anyway. This (...)
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  23. Henrik Syse & Martin L. Cook (2014). Editors' Introduction: New Times, or the Same Old? Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):1-2.
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  24. Paul T. Berghaus & Nathan L. Cartagena (2014). Developing Good Soldiers: The Problem of Fragmentation Within the Army. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):287-303.
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  25. Megan Braun & Daniel R. Brunstetter (2014). Rethinking the Criterion for Assessing Cia-Targeted Killings: Drones, Proportionality and Jus Ad Vim. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):304-324.
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  26. Walter E. Carter Jr (2014). The Ibar Bridge Attack. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):373-375.
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  27. Emmanuel R. Goffi (2014). The Ibar Bridge Attack: A Moral Assessment. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):380-382.
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  28. Mark N. Jensen (2014). Hard Moral Choices in the Military. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):341-356.
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  29. Dr Rebecca J. Johnson (2014). Issues in Military Ethics: To Support and Defend the Constitution. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):383-384.
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  30. Jeff Montrose (2014). Unjust War and a Soldier's Moral Dilemma. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):325-340.
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  31. Gregory M. Reichberg (2014). Second Response to Parsons. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):370-372.
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  32. Michael N. Schmitt (2014). The Ibar Bridge Attack: A Legal Assessment. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):376-379.
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