Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. Nikolay Milkov (forthcoming). On Walter Dubislav. History and Philosophy of Logic 35:1-15.
    This paper outlines the intellectual biography of Walter Dubislav. Besides being a leading member of the Berlin Group headed by Hans Reichenbach, Dubislav played a defining role as well in the Society for Empirical/Scientific Philosophy in Berlin. A student of David Hilbert, Dubislav applied the method of axiomatic to produce original work in logic and formalist philosophy of mathematics. He also introduced the elements of a formalist philosophy of science and addressed more general problems concerning the substantiation of human knowledge. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Phil Corkum (forthcoming). Is Aristotle's Syllogistic a Logic? History and Philosophy of Logic.
    Much of the last fifty years of scholarship on Aristotle’s syllogistic suggests a conceptual framework under which the syllogistic is a logic, a system of inferential reasoning, only if it is not a theory or formal ontology, a system concerned with general features of the world. In this paper, I will argue that this a misleading interpretative framework. The syllogistic is something sui generis: by our lights, it is neither clearly a logic, nor clearly a theory, but rather exhibits certain (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Sébastien Gandon (forthcoming). The Logical Must: Wittgensein on Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-3.
  4. Gregory Landini (forthcoming). The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell, Volume 5: Toward Principia Mathematica, 1905–1908. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-17.
  5. Panu Raatikainen (forthcoming). Neo-Logicism and its Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic.
    The rather unrestrained use of second-order logic in the neo-logicist program is critically examined. It is argued in some detail that it brings with it genuine set-theoretical existence assumptions, and that the mathematical power that Hume’s Principle seems to provide, in the derivation of Frege’s Theorem, comes largely from the “logic” assumed rather than from Hume’s principle. It is shown that Hume’s principle is in reality not stronger than the very weak Robinson Arithmetic Q. Consequently, only few rudimentary facts of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Gary Ebbs (forthcoming). Carnap, Tarski, and Quine at Harvard: Conversations on Logic, Mathematics, and Science. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-8.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Luca Gili (forthcoming). Alexander of Aphrodisias and the Heterodox Dictum de Omni Et de Nullo. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-15.
    Aristotle's explanation of what is said ‘of every’ and ‘of none’ has been interpreted either as involving individuals , or as regarding exclusively universal terms. I claim that Alexander of Aphrodisias endorsed this latter interpretation of the dictum de omni et de nullo. This interpretation affects our understanding of Alexander's syllogistic: as a matter of fact, Alexander maintained that the dictum de omni et de nullo is one of the core principles of syllogistic.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Paul Thom (forthcoming). Review of Terence Parsons, Articulating Medieval Logic. [REVIEW] History and Philosophy of Logic:1-3.
  9. Felice Cardone (forthcoming). Continuity in Semantic Theories of Programming. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-20.
    Continuity is perhaps the most familiar characterization of the finitary character of the operations performed in computation. We sketch the historical and conceptual development of this notion by interpreting it as a unifying theme across three main varieties of semantical theories of programming: denotational, axiomatic and event-based. Our exploration spans the development of this notion from its origins in recursion theory to the forms it takes in the context of the more recent event-based analyses of sequential and concurrent computations, touching (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Gary Ebbs (forthcoming). Satisfying Predicates: Kleene's Proof of the Hilbert–Bernays Theorem. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-21.
    The Hilbert–Bernays Theorem establishes that for any satisfiable first-order quantificational schema S, one can write out linguistic expressions that are guaranteed to yield a true sentence of elementary arithmetic when they are substituted for the predicate letters in S. The theorem implies that if L is a consistent, fully interpreted language rich enough to express elementary arithmetic, then a schema S is valid if and only if every sentence of L that can be obtained by substituting predicates of L for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Stamatios Gerogiorgakis (forthcoming). Mind the Croc! Rationality Gaps Vis-À-Vis the Crocodile Paradox. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-13.
    This article discusses rationality gaps triggered by self-referential/cyclic choice, the latter being understood as choosing according to a norm that refers to the choosing itself. The Crocodile Paradox is reformulated and analyzed as a game—named CP—whose Nash equilibrium is shown to trigger a cyclic choice and to invite a rationality gap. It is shown that choosing the Nash equilibrium of CP conforms to the principles Wolfgang Spohn and Haim Gaifman introduced to, allegedly, guarantee acyclicity but, in fact, does not prevent (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Eberhard Guhe (forthcoming). The Problem of Foundation in Early Nyāya and in Navya-Nyāya. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-17.
    The evaluation of arguments was not the sole concern of logicians in ancient India. Early Nyāya and the later Navya-Nyāya provide an interesting example of the interaction between logic and ontology. In their attempt to develop a kind of property-location logic Naiyāyikas had to consider what kind of restrictions they should impose on the residence relation between a property and its locus . Can we admit circular residence relations or infinitely descending chains of properties, each depending on its successor as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Anssi Korhonen (forthcoming). Other Logics: Alternatives to Formal Logic in the History of Thought and Contemporary Philosophy. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-4.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. I. Loeb (forthcoming). Alfred Tarski: Early Work in Poland – Geometry and Teaching. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-2.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. J. Payne (forthcoming). The Yablo Paradox: An Essay on Circularity. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-3.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Shahid Rahman (forthcoming). Essay on Russell on Modalities and Frege on Judgement. History and Philosophy of Logic.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Pierre-Jean Renaudie (forthcoming). La Question de la Logique Dans l'Idéalisme Allemand. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-4.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Joke Spruyt (forthcoming). Summaries of Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-3.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues