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Forthcoming articles
  1. Nikolay Milkov (forthcoming). On Walter Dubislav. History and Philosophy of Logic 35:1-15.
    This paper outlines the intellectual biography of Walter Dubislav. Besides being a leading member of the Berlin Group headed by Hans Reichenbach, Dubislav played a defining role as well in the Society for Empirical/Scientific Philosophy in Berlin. A student of David Hilbert, Dubislav applied the method of axiomatic to produce original work in logic and formalist philosophy of mathematics. He also introduced the elements of a formalist philosophy of science and addressed more general problems concerning the substantiation of human knowledge. (...)
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  2. Elena Ficara (forthcoming). Hegel's Glutty Negation. History and Philosophy of Logic 34 (1):1-10.
    Some authors have claimed that Hegel's ‘determinate negation’ should be distinguished from ‘logical’ or ‘formal’ negation, that is, from a view of negation as a contradictory forming operator. In contrast, I argue that dialectical determinate negation involves a view of negation as a contradictory forming operator, and can therefore count as formal negation in every respect. However, as it is clear in contemporary glutty semantics of negation, one may distinguish between different accounts of the relationship between negation, contradiction and content. (...)
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  3. Yann Benétreau-Dupin (forthcoming). Buridan's Solution to the Liar Paradox. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-11.
    Jean Buridan has offered a solution to the Liar Paradox, i.e. to the problem of assigning a truth-value to the sentence ‘What I am saying is false’. It has been argued that either this solution is ad hoc since it would only apply to self-referencing sentences [Read, S. 2002. ‘The Liar Paradox from John Buridan back to Thomas Bradwardine’, Vivarium, 40 , 189–218] or else it weakens his theory of truth, making his ‘a logic without truth’ [Klima, G. 2008. ‘Logic (...)
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  4. John Corcoran & Hassan Masoud (forthcoming). Existential Import Today: New Metatheorems; Historical, Philosophical, and Pedagogical Misconceptions. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-23.
    Contrary to common misconceptions, today's logic is not devoid of existential import: the universalized conditional ∀ x [S→ P] implies its corresponding existentialized conjunction ∃ x [S & P], not in all cases, but in some. We characterize the proexamples by proving the Existential-Import Equivalence: The antecedent S of the universalized conditional alone determines whether the universalized conditional has existential import, i.e. whether it implies its corresponding existentialized conjunction.A predicate is an open formula having only x free. An existential-import predicate (...)
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  5. Phil Corkum (forthcoming). Is Aristotle's Syllogistic a Logic? History and Philosophy of Logic.
    Much of the last fifty years of scholarship on Aristotle’s syllogistic suggests a conceptual framework under which the syllogistic is a logic, a system of inferential reasoning, only if it is not a theory or formal ontology, a system concerned with general features of the world. In this paper, I will argue that this a misleading interpretative framework. The syllogistic is something sui generis: by our lights, it is neither clearly a logic, nor clearly a theory, but rather exhibits certain (...)
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  6. Spencer Johnston (forthcoming). A Formal Reconstruction of Buridan's Modal Syllogism. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-16.
    In this paper, we provide a historical exposition of John Buridan's theory of divided modal propositions. We then develop a semantic interpretation of Buridan's theory which pays particular attention to Buridan's ampliation of modal terms. We show that these semantics correctly capture his syllogistic reasoning.
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  7. Giovanni Mion (forthcoming). The Square of Opposition: From Russell's Logic to Kant's Cosmology. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-6.
    In this paper, I will show to what extent we can use our modern understanding of the Square of Opposition in order to make sense of Kant's double standard solution to the cosmological antinomies. Notoriously, for Kant, both theses and antitheses of the mathematical antinomies are false, while both theses and antitheses of the dynamical antinomies are true. Kantian philosophers and interpreters have criticized Kant's solution as artificial and prejudicial. In the paper, I do not dispute such claims, but I (...)
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  8. Juan Manuel Campos Benítez (forthcoming). The Medieval Octagon of Opposition for Sentences with Quantified Predicates. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-15.
    The traditional Square of Opposition consists of four sentence types. Two are universal and two particular; two are affirmative and two negative. Examples, where ‘S’ and ‘P’ designate the subject and the predicate, are: ‘every S is P’, ‘no S is P’, ‘some S is P’ and ‘some S is not P’. Taking the usual sentences of the square of opposition, quantifying over their predicates exhibits non-standard sentence forms. These sentences may be combined into non-standard Squares of Opposition , and (...)
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  9. Jean-Yves Beziau & Stephen Read (forthcoming). EditorialSquare of Opposition: A Diagram and a Theory in Historical Perspective. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-2.
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  10. John P. Burgess (forthcoming). Philosophy of Mathematics in the Twentieth Century: Selected Essays. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-2.
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  11. Saloua Chatti (forthcoming). Avicenna on Possibility and Necessity. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-22.
    In this paper, I raise the following problem: How does Avicenna define modalities? What oppositional relations are there between modal propositions, whether quantified or not? After giving Avicenna's definitions of possibility, necessity and impossibility, I analyze the modal oppositions as they are stated by him. This leads to the following results: The relations between the singular modal propositions may be represented by means of a hexagon. Those between the quantified propositions may be represented by means of two hexagons that one (...)
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  12. Gary Ebbs (forthcoming). Carnap, Tarski, and Quine at Harvard: Conversations on Logic, Mathematics, and Science. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-8.
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  13. Michael J. Fitzgerald (forthcoming). The ‘Mysterious’ Thomas Manlevelt and Albert of Saxony. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-18.
    The essay casts doubt upon the view that Albert was criticizing or was dependent upon Thomas Manlevelt's logico-philosophical views, and counter argues that it is in fact Manlevelt who knows and cites Albert's views in his recently edited Porphyrian Questions, rather than vice versa. The argument for this conclusion proceeds in two stages. First, it is argued that the brief comment Albert makes about ‘conjunct descent’ in treating the definition of merely confused supposition his Perutilis Logica does not conclusively show (...)
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  14. Robert Laurence Gallagher (forthcoming). Antiphasis as Homonym in Aristotle. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-15.
    Antiphasis is a case of core-dependent homonymy, and has three significations in Aristotle's philosophy: antiphasis as an opposition between propositions ; antiphasis as the opposition between ‘subject’ and ‘not a subject’ in coming-to-be and perishing ; and antiphasis as the opposition between possession and privation . Argument based on the fifth type of priority described in Cat. 12 shows that, for Aristotle, the ontological significations are prior to the propositional.
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  15. Luca Gili (forthcoming). Alexander of Aphrodisias and the Heterodox Dictum de Omni Et de Nullo. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-15.
    Aristotle's explanation of what is said ‘of every’ and ‘of none’ has been interpreted either as involving individuals , or as regarding exclusively universal terms. I claim that Alexander of Aphrodisias endorsed this latter interpretation of the dictum de omni et de nullo. This interpretation affects our understanding of Alexander's syllogistic: as a matter of fact, Alexander maintained that the dictum de omni et de nullo is one of the core principles of syllogistic.
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  16. Chris Johns (forthcoming). Leibniz and the Square: A Deontic Logic for the Vir Bonus. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-8.
    Seventeenth century philosopher Gottfried Leibniz's contributions to metaphysics, mathematics, and logic are well known. Lesser known is his ‘invention’ of deontic logic, and that his invention derives from the alethic logic of the Aristotelian square of opposition. In this paper, I show how Leibniz developed this ‘logic of duties’, which designates actions as ‘possible, necessary, impossible, and omissible’ for a ‘vir bonus’ . I show that for Leibniz, deontic logic can determine whether a given action, e.g. as permitted, is therefore (...)
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  17. Andreas Kapsner (forthcoming). The Realism–Antirealism Debate in the Age of Alternative Logics. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-3.
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  18. Wolfgang Kienzler (forthcoming). Around and Beyond the Square of Opposition. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-2.
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  19. Paolo Mancosu (forthcoming). Grundlagen, Section 64: Frege's Discussion of Definitions by Abstraction in Historical Context. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-28.
    I offer in this paper a contextual analysis of Frege's Grundlagen, section 64. It is surprising that with so much ink spilled on that section, the sources of Frege's discussion of definitions by abstraction have remained elusive. I hope to have filled this gap by providing textual evidence coming from, among other sources, Grassmann, Schlömilch, and the tradition of textbooks in geometry for secondary schools . In addition, I put Frege's considerations in the context of a widespread debate in Germany (...)
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  20. Paul Thom (forthcoming). Review of Terence Parsons, Articulating Medieval Logic. [REVIEW] History and Philosophy of Logic:1-3.
  21. Matthias Wille (forthcoming). Basic Laws of Arithmetic. Derived Using Concept-Script. Volumes I & II. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-2.
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  22. Eberhard Guhe (forthcoming). The Problem of Foundation in Early Nyāya and in Navya-Nyāya. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-17.
    The evaluation of arguments was not the sole concern of logicians in ancient India. Early Nyāya and the later Navya-Nyāya provide an interesting example of the interaction between logic and ontology. In their attempt to develop a kind of property-location logic Naiyāyikas had to consider what kind of restrictions they should impose on the residence relation between a property and its locus . Can we admit circular residence relations or infinitely descending chains of properties, each depending on its successor as (...)
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  23. Shahid Rahman (forthcoming). Essay on Russell on Modalities and Frege on Judgement. History and Philosophy of Logic.
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