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Forthcoming articles
  1. Phil Corkum (forthcoming). Is Aristotle's Syllogistic a Logic? History and Philosophy of Logic.
    Much of the last fifty years of scholarship on Aristotle’s syllogistic suggests a conceptual framework under which the syllogistic is a logic, a system of inferential reasoning, only if it is not a theory or formal ontology, a system concerned with general features of the world. In this paper, I will argue that this a misleading interpretative framework. The syllogistic is something sui generis: by our lights, it is neither clearly a logic, nor clearly a theory, but rather exhibits certain (...)
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  2.  25
    Kenneth L. Pearce (forthcoming). Arnauld's Verbal Distinction Between Ideas and Perceptions. History and Philosophy of Logic.
    In his dispute with Malebranche about the nature of ideas, Arnauld endorses a form of direct realism. This appears to conflict with views put forward by Arnauld and his collaborators in the Port-Royal Grammar and Logic where ideas are treated as objects in the mind. This tension can be resolved by a careful examination of Arnauld's remarks on the semantics of 'perception' and 'idea' in light of the Port-Royal theory of language. This examination leads to the conclusion that Arnauld's ideas (...)
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  3. Panu Raatikainen (forthcoming). Neo-Logicism and its Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic.
    The rather unrestrained use of second-order logic in the neo-logicist program is critically examined. It is argued in some detail that it brings with it genuine set-theoretical existence assumptions, and that the mathematical power that Hume’s Principle seems to provide, in the derivation of Frege’s Theorem, comes largely from the “logic” assumed rather than from Hume’s principle. It is shown that Hume’s principle is in reality not stronger than the very weak Robinson Arithmetic Q. Consequently, only few rudimentary facts of (...)
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  4.  4
    Francesco Bellucci (forthcoming). Charles S. Peirce and the Medieval Doctrine of Consequentiae. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-25.
    In 1898 C. S. Peirce declares that the medieval doctrine of consequences had been the starting point of his logical investigations in the 1860s. This paper shows that Peirce studied the scholastic theory of consequentiae as early as 1866–67, that he adopted the scholastics’ terminology, and that that theory constituted a source of logical doctrine that sustained Peirce for a lifetime of creative and original work.
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  5.  15
    Carlo Cellucci (forthcoming). Frege on Thinking and Its Epistemic Significance. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-3.
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  6.  12
    Günther Eder (forthcoming). Boolos and the Metamathematics of Quine's Definitions of Logical Truth and Consequence. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-24.
    The paper is concerned with Quine's substitutional account of logical truth. The critique of Quine's definition tends to focus on miscellaneous odds and ends, such as problems with identity. However, in an appendix to his influential article On Second Order Logic, George Boolos offered an ingenious argument that seems to diminish Quine's account of logical truth on a deeper level. In the article he shows that Quine's substitutional account of logical truth cannot be generalized properly to the general concept of (...)
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  7.  8
    Elena Ficara (forthcoming). Treatise on Consequences. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-4.
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  8.  3
    Michael Joseph Fitzgerald (forthcoming). Albert of Saxony's View of Complex Terms in Categorical Propositions and the ‘English-Rule’. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-28.
    The essay first makes some observations on the general interrelationship between the logical writings of Albert and Buridan. Second, it gives an account of a ‘semantic logical model’ for analyzing complex subject terms in some basic categorical propositions which is defended by Albert of Saxony, and briefly recounts Buridan's criticisms of that model. Finally, the essay maintains that the Albertian model is typically compatible with, and a further development of, what is called by a late-fourteenth century anonymous scholar (...)
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  9.  18
    L. M. Geerdink & C. Dutilh Novaes (forthcoming). Varieties of Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-3.
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  10.  1
    Stamatios Gerogiorgakis (forthcoming). Mind the Croc! Rationality Gaps Vis-À-Vis the Crocodile Paradox. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-13.
    This article discusses rationality gaps triggered by self-referential/cyclic choice, the latter being understood as choosing according to a norm that refers to the choosing itself. The Crocodile Paradox is reformulated and analyzed as a game—named CP—whose Nash equilibrium is shown to trigger a cyclic choice and to invite a rationality gap. It is shown that choosing the Nash equilibrium of CP conforms to the principles Wolfgang Spohn and Haim Gaifman introduced to, allegedly, guarantee acyclicity but, in fact, does not prevent (...)
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  11.  9
    M. Hartimo (forthcoming). Essays on Gödel's Reception of Leibniz, Husserl, and Brouwer. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-3.
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  12.  2
    John Kadvany (forthcoming). Pāṇini's Grammar and Modern Computation. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-22.
    Pāṇini's fourth century BC Sanskrit grammar uses rewrite rules utilizing an explicit formal language defined through a semi-formal metalanguage. The grammar is generative, meaning that it is capable of expressing a potential infinity of well-formed Sanskrit sentences starting from a finite symbolic inventory. The grammar's operational rules involve extensive use of auxiliary markers, in the form of Sanskrit phonemes, to control grammatical derivations. Pāṇini's rules often utilize a generic context-sensitive format to identify terms used in replacement, modification or deletion operations. (...)
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  13.  4
    Gregory Landini (forthcoming). Whitehead's Emended Principia. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-56.
    There are many wonderful puzzles concerning Principia Mathematica, but none are more striking than those arising from the crisis that befell Whitehead in November of 1910. Volume 1 appeared in December of 1910. Volume 2 on cardinal numbers and Russell's relation arithmetic might have appeared in 1911 but for Whitehead's having halted the printing. He discovered that inferences involving the typically ambiguous notation ‘Nc‘α’ for the cardinal number of α might generate fallacies. When the volume appeared in 1912, it was (...)
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  14.  7
    M. Marion & H. Rückert (forthcoming). Aristotle on Universal Quantification: A Study From the Point of View of Game Semantics. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-29.
    In this paper we provide an interpretation of Aristotle's rule for the universal quantifier in Topics Θ 157a34–37 and 160b1–6 in terms of Paul Lorenzen's dialogical logic. This is meant as a contribution to the rehabilitation of the role of dialectic within the Organon. After a review of earlier views of Aristotle on quantification, we argue that this rule is related to the dictum de omni in Prior Analytics A 24b28–29. This would be an indication of the dictum’s origin in (...)
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  15.  2
    John Neil Martin (forthcoming). A Note on ‘Distributive Terms, Truth, and The Port Royal Logic’. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-2.
    A note correcting some technical terminology from linguistics found in ‘Distributive Terms, Truth, and The Port Royal Logic’, this journal, Jan. 17, 2013, 133–54.
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  16.  9
    Shahid Rahman (forthcoming). Essay on Russell on Modalities and Frege on Judgement. History and Philosophy of Logic.
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  17.  7
    James T. Smith (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Mathematics and Logic in the 1920s and 1930s in Poland. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-4.
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  18.  5
    Paul Thom (forthcoming). Robert Kilwardby's Disputational Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-14.
    The article is concerned with the account of Aristotle's theory of disputation given by Robert Kilwardby in his commentary, composed in Paris during the 1240s, on Aristotle's Prior Analytics. Specifically, I show that Kilwardby covers demonstrative as well as dialectical disputations, and gives an elementary account of the rules governing such disputations, in their adversarial forms as well as in an idealized form where the interlocutors engage in a cooperative activity. I describe the resemblances and the differences between disputations as (...)
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  19.  2
    Russell Wahl (forthcoming). The Palgrave Centenary Companion to Principia Mathematica. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-4.
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